Arts feature

The mediums who pioneered abstract art

26 September 2020 9:00 am

The mediumistic art of various cranks, crackpots and old dowagers is finally being taken seriously – and about time too, says Laura Gascoigne

The gentle genius of Mervyn Peake

19 September 2020 9:00 am

Mervyn Peake’s unsettling illustrations reveal a gentle, kindly man with the soul of a pirate, says Daisy Dunn

The forgotten female composer fêted by Mozart and Haydn

12 September 2020 9:00 am

Selina Mills on Maria Theresia von Paradis, the gifted but forgotten 18th-century composer, whose story will finally be told in a new chamber opera

Defund theatres – and give the money to gardeners and bingo halls

5 September 2020 9:00 am

Why does the state fund theatres and not gardening and bingo, asks Lloyd Evans

The art of street furniture

29 August 2020 9:00 am

On his lockdown rambles, Christopher Howse finds beauty and solace in London’s street furniture

The original Edinburgh Festival

22 August 2020 9:00 am

James Sadler’s 1815 balloon flight, a Fringe first, heralded the greatest musical extravaganza that Scotland had ever seen, says John D. Halliday

‘Where I grew up, classical music was diversity’: an interview with conductor Alpesh Chauhan

15 August 2020 9:00 am

Richard Bratby talks to Birmingham Opera Company’s new music director Alpesh Chauhan about his Brummie roots, Bruckner and how his BAME heritage is a non-story

'Cocaine addiction is time-consuming': the rise and fall of Kevin Rowland and Dexys

8 August 2020 9:00 am

Michael Hann talks to Kevin Rowland about Dexys, insecurity and the cocaine years

The real Rupert Murdoch, by Kelvin MacKenzie

1 August 2020 9:00 am

The BBC documentary on Rupert Murdoch is pure one-sided bile, says Kelvin MacKenzie

Model villages aren't just for kids

25 July 2020 9:00 am

Model villages deliver a cheerful jolt to unexamined notions about our own place – and size – in the world, says Richard Bratby

Drive-in cinemas are back – but for how long?

18 July 2020 9:00 am

Tanya Gold on the rise and fall of drive-in cinema

The weird and wonderful world of hotel carpets

11 July 2020 9:00 am

Sophie Haigney on the weird and wonderful world of hotel carpets

Culture is going underground: meet the rebel army

4 July 2020 9:00 am

Leaf Arbuthnot and Igor Toronyi-Lalic on the new cultural rebels

The festivalisation of TV

27 June 2020 9:00 am

Televising Glastonbury has changed the festival, and in turn transformed television, says Graeme Thomson

The statue-topplers are obsessed with white men and white history

20 June 2020 9:00 am

The statue-topplers reveal a Eurocentric view of the world that ignores the achievements of black and Asian luminaries, says Tanjil Rashid

This crisis could be the catalyst for a golden age of British theatre

13 June 2020 9:00 am

The coronavirus crisis offers theatre a golden opportunity to break free of the structures that have held it back for years, says William Cook

How John Constable got masterpiece after masterpiece out of a tiny corner of rural Suffolk

6 June 2020 9:00 am

John Constable’s paintings of a tiny corner of rural Suffolk teach us to see the beauty on our doorstep, says Martin Gayford

Dion, one of the last living links to the earliest days of rock ’n’ roll

30 May 2020 9:00 am

He toured with Little Richard, sang with Van Morrison, inspired the Beatles and Paul Simon. Graeme Thomson talks to Dion, one of the last living links to the early days of street-corner rock ’n’ roll

Swanky, stale and sullen, the summer music festival has had its day

23 May 2020 9:00 am

The summer music festival has had its day, says Norman Lebrecht

Europe's eye-popping first glimpse of the Americas

16 May 2020 9:00 am

The earliest depictions of the Americas were eye-popping, and shaped European art, says Laura Gascoigne

William Boyd on the miraculous snaps of boy genius Jacques Henri Lartigue

9 May 2020 9:00 am

William Boyd on the miraculous snaps of boy genius Jacques Henri Lartigue

Why we love requiems

2 May 2020 9:00 am

Alexandra Coghlan on the enduring appeal of requiems

From Middlemarch to Mickey Mouse: a short history of The Spectator’s books and arts pages

24 April 2020 11:00 pm

The Spectator arts and books pages have spent 10,000 issues identifying the dominant cultural phenomena of the day and being difficult about them, says Richard Bratby

The musical benefits of not playing live

18 April 2020 9:00 am

Many performers hated playing live. But freed from the stage they often made their best and wildest work, argues Graeme Thomson

Welder, banjo player, comedian, actor, and now artist – Billy Connolly interviewed

11 April 2020 9:00 am

William Cook talks to Billy Connolly – welder, banjo player, comedian, actor, and now artist – about growing up in Glasgow, ditching the mike stand and living with Parkinson’s