Duncan Fallowell

Beyond Timbuktu

9 September 2017 9:00 am

Every so often a monster comes along. Here’s one — but a monster of fact not fiction, over 700 pages…

The writer Natalie Barney and painter Romaine Brooks in Paris c. 1915

From Auden to Wilde: a roll call of gay talent

9 April 2016 9:00 am

The Comintern was the name given to the international communist network in the Soviet era, advancing the cause wherever it…

Happy early days: Erika and Klaus in 1927

Was Klaus Mann all Thomas Mann's fault?

27 February 2016 9:00 am

Thomas Mann, despite strong homosexual emotions, had six children. The two eldest, Erika and Klaus, born in 1905 and 1906…

The Winter Palace, St Petersburg, 1840, by Ferdinand Victor Perrot (Pushkin Museum)

The man who knows all the Hermitage's secrets - and he's keeping them

10 October 2015 9:00 am

The front cover of this book describes the Hermitage as ‘the Greatest Museum in the World’. That sobriquet must go…

Machado de Assis wasn’t the Dickens of Brazil— but he is one of the greats

15 August 2015 9:00 am

The surname is pronounced ‘M’shahdo j’Asseece’. There are also two Christian names — Joaquim Maria — which are usually dispensed…

Bernard Berenson and Kenneth Clark: pen friends, not true friends

25 April 2015 9:00 am

Robert Cumming’s opening sentence is: ‘Kenneth Clark and Bernard Berenson first met in the summer of 1925.’ One is then…

Why is a fish like a bicycle? Pedro Friedeberg’s letters to Duncan Fallowell may provide a clue at last

11 April 2015 9:00 am

The year 2015 has been designated one of Anglo-Mexican amity, with celebrations planned in both countries by both governments. But…

An ill-waged war against the war on drugs

17 January 2015 9:00 am

Since drugs became popular, there have been countless books on what to do with them. The most interesting are those…

The most romantic winter resort in Europe: Taormina, with Mount Etna in the background, by Edward Lear

The fruitcake island of Sicily and its legion of literary visitors

3 May 2014 9:00 am

At the opposite end of the Continent to ourselves, Sicily has always been an attraction for the English who, from…

William S. Burroughs was a writer – not a painter, prophet, philosopher

8 February 2014 9:00 am

William S. Burroughs lived his life in the grand transgressive tradition of Lord Byron and Oscar Wilde and, like all…

The World According to Karl, edited by Jean-Christophe Napias - review

14 September 2013 9:00 am

Every fashion era has its monster and in ours it’s Karl Lagerfeld, a man who has so emptied himself on…