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Books

From Auden to Wilde: a roll call of gay talent

Gregory Woods’s Homintern opens with a bracing demolition of homophobia but rapidly descends into social tittle-tattle

9 April 2016

9:00 AM

9 April 2016

9:00 AM

Homintern: How Gay Culture Liberated the Modern World Gregory Woods

Yale, pp.432, £25, ISBN: 9780300218039

The Comintern was the name given to the international communist network in the Soviet era, advancing the cause wherever it could. The ‘Homintern’, a wry play on that, was first coined at Oxford by Maurice Bowra and gladly passed on by Cyril Connolly, Auden and others, inferring an international homosexual network of mutual interest and support.

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