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Arts feature

How will the British public take to Rubens’s fatties?

The British have never warmed to the Flemish master’s fleshy paintings. But then neither did he have a very high opinion of us

24 January 2015

9:00 AM

24 January 2015

9:00 AM

This week a monumental exhibition, Rubens and His Legacy, is opening at the Royal Academy. It makes the case — surely correct — that the Flemish master was among the most influential figures in European art. There are few painters of the 18th or 19th century — from Joshua Reynolds to Cézanne, Watteau to Constable — who were not affected by his work.

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‘Rubens and His Legacy: Van Dyck to Cézanne’ is at the Royal Academy until 10 April. Martin Gayford will review the exhibition next week.

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