Science

Letters: Is cycling really conservative?

9 January 2021 9:00 am

Veritas vincit Sir: Professor Dawkins eloquently and engagingly defines true truth for us (‘Matters of fact’, 19 December). It seems…

The insidious attacks on scientific truth

19 December 2020 9:00 am

What is truth? You can speak of moral truths and aesthetic truths but I’m not concerned with those here, important…

A singular mind: Roger Penrose on his Nobel Prize

19 December 2020 9:00 am

Roger Penrose on his Nobel Prize, the beauty of physics – and why AI is nothing to fear

Christiaan Huygens – hero of time and space

19 December 2020 9:00 am

This book, soaked like the Dutch Republic itself ‘in ink and paint’, is enchanting to the point of escapism. The…

Unpleasant smells can actually enhance pleasure

12 December 2020 9:00 am

Harold McGee’s Nose Dive: A Field Guide to the World’s Smells is an ambitious and enormous work. Indeed it’s so…

The solving of a biological mystery

2 December 2020 5:00 am

DNA is the blueprint that encodes the instructions to make proteins. Proteins are the building blocks and the machines that…

The dangers of unconscious bias training

15 August 2020 9:00 am

Diversity training doesn’t work

Why I will wear a face mask

18 July 2020 9:00 am

We are enjoined by certain experts to wear face masks while having sexual intercourse. No change there, then, for me.…

How we can overcome Britain's problem with scientific illiteracy

21 April 2020 7:27 pm

It occurs to me that one of the most important lessons we’ve learnt so far during this time of plague…

Do face masks work? A note on the evidence

19 April 2020 8:38 pm

Should we, or should we not be compelled to wear face masks during a virus epidemic? It sounds a simple…

The evidence on Covid-19 is not as clear as we think

28 March 2020 9:00 am

There is still plenty we don’t understand about the virus

How British science can flourish after Brexit

14 March 2020 9:00 am

How British science can flourish after Brexit

A book that could save lives: Adam Rutherford’s How to Argue with a Racist reviewed

14 March 2020 9:00 am

In the award-winning musical Avenue Q, filthy-minded puppets sang about schadenfreude, internet porn, loud sex, the uselessness of an English…

How close is humanity to destroying itself?

7 March 2020 9:00 am

Humanity has come startlingly close to destroying itself in the 75 or so years in which it has had the…

Babies are aware of bilingualism from birth — if not before

24 January 2020 10:00 pm

Probably most of the world is bilingual, or more than bilingual. It is common in many countries to speak a…

It’s science, not protest, that will save the planet

21 December 2019 9:00 am

One might expect that the challenge of climate change would encourage many young people to take up Stem (science, technology,…

Radio 4’s The Art of Innovation is a series that — for once — deserves the label ‘landmark’

28 September 2019 9:00 am

Radio 4, how do I love thee? Rather as one loves the flocked wallpaper that came with the house. It…

Business is the only area of human activity where you get paid to change your mind

14 September 2019 9:00 am

In 1891, a 29-year-old man moved from Philadelphia to Chicago intending to start a business. With $32 to his name,…

Earth dying in five billion years I can deal with, but not a world-weary Brian Cox

1 June 2019 9:00 am

When you see the opening caption ‘4.6 billion years ago’, it’s a pretty safe bet that you’re watching a programme…

Plastic fantastic: British Industried Fair, 1948

How plastic saved the elephant and tortoise

1 June 2019 9:00 am

Plastics — even venerable, historically eloquent plastics — hardly draw the eye. As this show’s insightful accompanying publication (a snip…

The man who never cried

9 February 2019 9:00 am

It was odd listening to Jim Al-Khalili being interviewed on Radio 4 on Tuesday morning rather than the other way…

It’s not science I don’t trust – it’s the scientists

25 August 2018 9:00 am

Everyone knows the real reason people like Donald Trump are sceptical of climate change is that conservatives are fundamentally anti-science.…

Sarah Higgins (Helena) and Henry Pettigrew (Bob) in Midsummer

Conversations with a penis, having a laugh about Brexit and why titles matter: Edinburgh Festival reviewed

18 August 2018 9:00 am

David Greig has written the international festival’s flagship drama, Midsummer. This farcical romance is performed as a party piece by…

The long limbs, light frame and deep chest of sighthounds, like the Borzoi or Russian wolfhound, give them the speed and endurance to outrun their quarry. Drawing by Katrina van Grouw

The selective breeding of pets: how far should we go?

11 August 2018 9:00 am

It was in his play Back to Methuselah that George Bernard Shaw honoured a lesser known aspect of Charles Darwin’s…

Exhilaratingly original, C4’s Flowers is much more than just a ‘dark comedy’

16 June 2018 9:00 am

On Wednesday, BBC Four made an unexpectedly strong case that the human body is a bit rubbish. Our ill-designed spines,…