David Crane

Benjamin Lay (American School, 18th century)

Raising Cain

16 September 2017 9:00 am

It is a pretty safe bet that for every 1,000 people who know of William Wilberforce, no more than the…

A depiction of the martyred Edmund Campion

When English Catholics were considered as dangerous as jihadis

24 October 2015 9:00 am

Martyrdom, these days, does not get a good press. Fifty years ago English Catholics could take a ghoulish pride in…

The forgotten army: abandoned by the British to the horrors of Partition

13 June 2015 9:00 am

It is often said that cricket was ‘a game invented by the English and played by Indians’, and every so…

Isaak Israelevich Brodsky’s depiction of the execution of the ‘26 Martyrs’, painted in 1925 and already the stuff of Soviet legend

Murder in the dunes: the ‘26 Martyrs’ of Baku and the making of a Soviet legend

21 February 2015 9:00 am

In the pre-dawn hours of 20 September 1918, a train, its headlamp off, heading eastwards out of Kransnovodsk on the…

William Marshal: kingmaker — or just king of the joust?

17 January 2015 9:00 am

In February 1861 a 21-year-old French medievalist called Paul Meyer walked into Sotheby’s auction house near Covent Garden. He had…

Burying the dead of Waterloo

Narrative history at its best – and bloodiest

11 October 2014 9:00 am

Anyone thinking of bringing out a book on Waterloo at the moment must be very confident, very brave or just…

What, in the end, was it all for? In a French caricature of 1814, Napoleon precariously spans Madrid and Moscow and begins to topple. Fontainebleau — scene of his abdication — is depicted centre-stage

If you want to admire Napoleon, it helps not to have met Gaddafi

4 October 2014 9:00 am

Forty-odd years ago, in the early phase of the Gaddafi regime, I had the slightly mixed fortune to attend the…

‘The Final Advance of the Guard’ by Nicolas Toussaint Charlet

An old soldier sees through the smoke of Waterloo

21 June 2014 8:00 am

There is a very nice story of a dinner for Waterloo veterans at which Alexandre Dumas — ‘Dum-ass,’ as the…

Patrick Leigh Fermor as a major in the parachute regiment, October 1945

Patrick Leigh Fermor and the long, daft tradition of Brits trying to save Greece

31 May 2014 9:00 am

Twenty-odd years ago, while on holiday in the deep Mani at the foot of the Peloponnese, I got into conversation…

Three of the best: Edward Thomas (left), Wilfred Owen (above right) and Edmund Blunden

Look again – the first world war poets weren't pacifists

10 May 2014 9:00 am

If the poets of the first world war probably enjoy a higher profile now than they have done at any…

‘There was no better way’: Ancient Celts or Gauls go into battle against the massed ranks of Rome, and are slaughtered for the good of posterity

War is good for us

5 April 2014 9:00 am

At the heart of this work is a startling and improbable statistic and the equally surprising and counterintuitive thesis that…

How Denmark’s Jews escaped the Nazis

8 March 2014 9:00 am

Of all the statistics generated by the Holocaust, perhaps some of the most disturbing in the questions they give rise…

How we beat Napoleon

2 November 2013 9:00 am

It feels the height of ingratitude to blame Jane Austen for anything, but it probably is her fault that most…

Why does Max Hastings have such a hatred for the British military?

14 September 2013 9:00 am

One of the great problems for any historian writing of 1914 and the slide into conflict is that everyone knows…