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Arts feature

From ancient Egyptian smut to dissent-by-currency: I object at the British Museum reviewed

8 September 2018

9:00 AM

8 September 2018

9:00 AM

‘If liberty means anything at all it means the right to tell people what they do not want to hear,’ wrote George Orwell in his preface to Animal Farm.

It is a line that has gone down as one of the great capsule defences of dissent, made all the more prescient by the fact that the preface, an attack on the self-censorship of the British media during the second world war, wasn’t published until the 1970s.

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