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Arts feature

Why plotting a sound map of London is impossible

It’s easy to tag the terrain of the capital city by writer. But what might a map of its music look like?, wonders Philip Clark

18 July 2015

9:00 AM

18 July 2015

9:00 AM

The opening bars of Ralph Vaughan Williams’s A London Symphony (1914) are scooped out from the gloopy bedrock of the city. Vaughan Williams was dredging through the same mud, silt, slime and ooze as those scene-setting paragraphs of Our Mutual Friend (1865), where Charles Dickens shows that the real glue binding his book together will be the River Thames.

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