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Dance

Romeo, Juliet and Mussolini

Sadler's Wells throw lovers into the cauldron of Italian Fascism. Plus: a Royal Opera House triple bill that is only let down by a murder that drags

24 May 2014

9:00 AM

24 May 2014

9:00 AM

Triple Bill

Royal Opera House, in rep until 26 May

Romeo and Juliet

Sadler’s Wells

George Balanchine’s Serenade, the manifesto of 20th-century neoclassical choreography, requires a deep understanding of both its complex stylistic nuances and its fascinatingly elusive visual metaphors. Many recent stagings have failed to meet such criteria,  but not the performance I saw last week. Things did not exactly start especially well, as the opening group of ladies with raised arms lacked ‘magic’ evenness.

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