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Books

Samuel Beckett walks into a nail bar

A review of George Saunders’ award-winning book of short stories Tenth of December. Distinct, troubling, funny: Saunders is a worthy winner of the Folio prize

29 March 2014

9:00 AM

29 March 2014

9:00 AM

Tenth of December George Saunders

Bloomsbury, pp.288, £8.99, ISBN: 9781408837368

It isn’t very often that a writer’s work is so striking that you can remember exactly where and when you were when you first read it. I was in a parked car in a hilly suburb of Cardiff last summer when I first became aware of George Saunders, from reading a speech he’d addressed to his American students printed in that day’s edition of the International Herald Tribune.

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