Theatre

If you see this show you’ll want to see it again – directed properly: The Glass Menagerie, at the Duke of York's Theatre, reviewed

2 July 2022 9:00 am

The Glass Menagerie directed by Jeremy Herrin is a bit of an eyeball-scrambler. The action takes place on a huge…

Bloated waffle: Jitney at the Old Vic reviewed

25 June 2022 9:00 am

The Old Vic’s new show, Jitney, has a mystifying YouTube advert which gives no information about the play or the…

Joyously liberating: Tony! [The Tony Blair Rock Opera] reviewed

18 June 2022 9:00 am

Harry Hill’s latest musical traces Tony Blair’s bizarre career from student pacifist to war-mongering plaything of the United States. With…

Gandhi’s killer is more loveable than his victim: The Father and the Assassin reviewed

11 June 2022 9:00 am

Dictating to the Estate is a piece of community theatre that explains why Grenfell Tower went up in flames on…

Newcomers will need to read the play in advance: Julius Caesar, at the Globe, reviewed

4 June 2022 9:00 am

Some things are done well in the Globe’s new Julius Caesar. The assassination is a thrilling spectacle. Ketchup pouches concealed…

Hard to believe this rambling apprentice-piece ever made it to the stage: Almeida's The House of Shades reviewed

28 May 2022 9:00 am

The House of Shades is a state-of-the nation play that covers the past six decades of grinding poverty in Nottingham.…

The playwright seems curiously detached about rape: The Breach, at Hampstead Theatre, reviewed

21 May 2022 9:00 am

Hampstead’s latest play is a knotty rape drama by Naomi Wallace set in Kentucky. Four teenagers with weird names meet…

Two hours of bickering from a couple of doughnut-shaped crybabies: Middle, at the Dorfman Theatre, reviewed

14 May 2022 9:00 am

‘I fink I doan luv yew any maw.’ A marital bust-up drama at the National Theatre opens with a whining…

Angry diatribes and amusing pranks: Donmar Warehouse's Marys Seacole reviewed

7 May 2022 9:00 am

The title of the Donmar’s new effort, Marys Seacole, appears to be a misprint and that makes the reader look…

Muddled, tricksy and cheap: The Corn is Green at the Lyttelton Theatre reviewed

30 April 2022 9:00 am

The Corn is Green by Emlyn Williams is a sociology essay written in 1938 about a prickly tyrant, Miss Moffat,…

This Trump satire is too soft on Sleepy Joe and Cackling Kamala: The 47th at the Old Vic reviewed

23 April 2022 9:00 am

Trump is said to be a gift for bad satirists and a problem for good ones. He dominates Mike Bartlett’s…

Could the Arts Council pay Americans to keep this stuff in America? Daddy and The Fever Syndrome reviewed

16 April 2022 9:00 am

The Fever Syndrome is a dramatised lecture set in a New York brownstone occupied by the super-brainy Myers family. The…

Shakespearean directors could learn from this: the National Theatre’s Hamlet for 8- 12-year-olds reviewed

9 April 2022 9:00 am

The NT has rejigged Hamlet for 8- to 12-year-old children. It’s a decent attempt to cover the highlights at a…

A play for bureaucrats: David Hare's Straight Line Crazy reviewed

2 April 2022 9:00 am

It’s good of Nicholas Hytner to let Londoners see David Hare’s new play before it travels to Broadway where it…

It’s years since I saw anything as nasty as this: Cock at the Ambassadors Theatre reviewed

26 March 2022 9:00 am

Cock was written by Mike Bartlett in 2009 while he was in Mexico at a drama conference. The title suggests…

A must-see for Westminster obsessives: Riverside Studios' Bloody Difficult Women reviewed

19 March 2022 9:00 am

Bloody Difficult Women is a documentary drama by the popular journalist Tim Walker, which looks at the similarities between Gina…

Stands alongside Under Milk Wood: Shedding a Skin, at Soho Theatre, reviewed

12 March 2022 9:00 am

Shedding a Skin opens with an office nightmare. Amanda is a mixed-race employee in a predominantly white firm who gets…

Paul Bettany's Warhol is a tour de force: The Collaboration, at the Young Vic, reviewed

5 March 2022 9:00 am

The Collaboration is set in the 1980s when Andy Warhol teamed up with the painter Jean-Michel Basquiat to create bad…

A beautiful, frustrating bore: Florian Zeller's The Forest, at Hampstead Theatre, reviewed

26 February 2022 9:00 am

The Forest is the latest thriller from the French dramatist Florian Zeller, translated by Oscar winner Christopher Hampton. It’s a…

All a bit Blackadder: Hamlet, at the Sam Wanamaker Playhouse, reviewed

19 February 2022 9:00 am

Never Not Once has a cold and forbidding title but it starts as an amusing tale set in an LA…

A tangle of nonsense from the sloppy Caryl Churchill: A Number, at the Old Vic, reviewed

12 February 2022 9:00 am

A Number, by Caryl Churchill, is a sci-fi drama of impenetrable complexity. It’s set in a future society where cloning…

Is this the worst production of all time? Royal Court's The Glow reviewed

5 February 2022 9:00 am

It’s getting silly now. London’s subsidised theatres aren’t just competing to put on the worst play of the year but…

Borderline soft porn but thrilling: Moulin Rouge! The Musical at Piccadilly Theatre reviewed

29 January 2022 9:00 am

Moulin Rouge wins no marks for its storyline. A struggling Parisian theatre is bought out by an evil financier who…

Suchet makes Poirot sound like craft beer: Poirot and More, at Harold Pinter Theatre, reviewed

22 January 2022 9:00 am

Producers are getting jittery again. Large-scale shows look risky when a single infection can postpone an entire show. Hence Poirot…

One of the best nights of my life: Hampstead Theatre's Peggy For You reviewed

15 January 2022 9:00 am

Hampstead Theatre has revived a play about Peggy Ramsay, the legendary West End agent who shaped the careers of Joe…