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Exhibitions

In defence of conceptual art

Conceptual art can be fanciful rubbish but at its best it’s funny, arresting and, in spite of itself, even beautiful

16 April 2016

9:00 AM

16 April 2016

9:00 AM

At the tail end of last year, an artist called Peter Goodfellow mounted an exhibition of paintings titled Treason of the Scholars. The works were a garish parody of the signature styles of blue-chip artists including Jeff Koons, Damien Hirst and Joseph Beuys — not so much satire as aggravated assault.

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Conceptual Art in Britain 1964–1979 is at Tate Britain until 29 August.

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