Arts feature

The holy relics of the Easter Rising: from hallowed flags to rebel biscuits

19 March 2016

9:00 AM

19 March 2016

9:00 AM

This is the first exhibition I’ve been to where the Prime Minister joined the hacks at the press view. A week after the Irish general election, the Taoiseach, Enda Kenny, came to the biggest show in Ireland devoted to the centenary of the Easter Rising. Kenny’s presence at the press launch just goes to show how the Irish rebellion against British rule at Easter 1916 is still the defining story of modern Ireland.

In fact, the Easter Rising was a pretty good failure, although I didn’t suggest that to the Prime Minister at the press view. The rebellion lasted only six days before it was put down by the British army. Other attacks on British barracks in Meath, Galway and Wexford didn’t get very far either. Planned attacks in Cork, Tyrone and Donegal never happened. And Irish independence didn’t come until 1922, after the War of Independence.

But, still, the Easter Rising is treated with a holy reverence — partly because it happened in Easter Week in a devout country; more because of the brutal treatment of the rebels. Sixteen of them were executed — and they quickly became political martyrs, tinged with a semi-religious aura.

That reverence for the Rising and its leaders is what makes this comprehensive show so gripping. What had been a fairly small-scale rebellion was immediately treated as the definitive spiritual battle on an island soaked for centuries with the blood of thousands, from dozens of battles. As a result, the 300 objects in this show were also immediately treated with the reverence shown to religious relics. And what an exceptional, captivating collection of relics they are.

Some of them have the inevitable macabre fascination of things associated with fighting and death. One oddly heart-stopping object is a cricket bat from Elvery’s shop window on Sackville Street, which was caught up in the shooting and looting that began on the afternoon of Easter Monday. Hit by the crossfire, the bat still has a bullet lodged in it.


After the Rising, the most everyday things took on a holy green hue, among them the blocks of metal print used for the ‘Proclamation of the Irish Republic’. Even the printers’ huge battered table, on which they laid out the print, is on show. Nearby is the holiest of holies — the green flag, with ‘Irish Republic’ in gold Celtic letters, which flew from the flagpole of the General Post Office on O’Connell Street (then Sackville Street), the headquarters of the Rising’s leaders. Captured by soldiers of the Royal Irish Regiment, the flag was given to George V, before it was donated to the Irish government in 1966 on the Rising’s 50th anniversary.

The poignant story of the 200,000 Irishmen who fought in the first world war for a nation their countrymen were rebelling against is movingly and objectively told. One extraordinary surviving artefact is a handwritten poster erected by Germans opposite the trenches of the Royal Munster Fusiliers on the Western Front during the uprising. ‘Irishmen!’ the German poster reads in stilted English, ‘Heavy uproar in Ireland, English guns are firing at your wifes [sic] and children!’

That poster was lent to the exhibition by the Queen — a sign of how much Anglo-Irish relations have improved in recent years. The Queen’s trip to Ireland in 2011 was the first visit of a British monarch there in a century.

And it wasn’t so long ago that the Irish contribution to Allied efforts in the first world war was kept extremely quiet. The history of the Irishmen at the Western Front during the Easter Rising is recorded without judgment; most stirringly through the cigarette case of Harry Mitchelson, a 20-year-old cinema projectionist in Phibsborough, Dublin, who joined the West Yorkshire Regiment in September 1915. The inscription on the case reads, ‘With best wishes. From the Proprietor and Staff of the Bohemian Picture Theatre, Dublin. Sept 11th 1915.’ Fifteen months after reaching the Front, Mitchelson was dead.

Naturally, the exhibition is extremely green overall, as you’d expect of a show devoted to the national event of a country in its national museum. But there is no tub-thumping, or any unpleasant jingoism. It covers the British soldiers at the Easter Rising, too, not least the Georgius Rex, the British Home Guard, known by Dubliners as the ‘Gorgeous Wrecks’, thanks to their advanced age. There was outrage in Dublin when one Gorgeous Wreck, Francis Browning, 47, was shot, unarmed, on returning from a training day. From then on, the rebels ordered that only armed soldiers should be targeted.

The aftermath of the Rising is just as comprehensively treated, not least through the nun’s outfit worn by one rebel, Liam Mellows, as he fled Ireland for America. The most revered of all the carefully preserved relics are items used by the rebels imprisoned after the failed rebellion. Among them is the tablecloth that covered the table on which Mass was celebrated by prisoners in Dublin’s Richmond Barracks. Even the prison biscuits given to jailed rebels have survived — the ultimate sign that anything associated with the Rising, however disposable, immediately assumed hallowed status.

The setting of the exhibition played its part in the Easter Rising, too. The National Museum of Ireland is housed in the Collins Barracks — named after Michael Collins, the Irish revolutionary leader who fought at the Easter Rising and was later killed in the Irish Civil War. In fact, the vast, spare, classical barracks were originally built in 1702 for the British army. This was where Wolfe Tone, hero of the Irish Rebellion of 1798, was imprisoned and court-martialled. And it was a crucial British army barracks during the Easter Rising.

Everywhere you walk through Dublin’s Georgian streets, you are reminded of the city’s British past. Still, a century after the Easter Rising, the rebellion has now passed from living memory into history. It’s striking that, even though the Prime Minister came to the show, the first questions the press asked were about last month’s general election, not the Rising itself. The Rising remains Ireland’s most important historical event; it is no longer its number-one modern political issue.

At Dublin airport, I even saw a poster for an Easter Rising bus trip, ‘The 1916 Tour — Beyond Barricades: a dramatic, theatrical tour… with performances by award-winning theatre company Anu Productions.’ You couldn’t have made a tourist attraction out of the Easter Rising until very recently.

Still, only this month, dissident republicans stuck a bomb under a prison officer’s car in east Belfast. The Police Service of Northern Ireland said it was worried about republicans stepping up their attacks to mark the Rising’s centenary. The shock waves of 1916 haven’t settled quite yet.

‘Proclaiming a Republic: The 1916 Rising’ is at the National Museum of Ireland, Dublin. Closed Mondays, except Easter Monday.

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Show comments
  • Arron Blue

    Love live the Republic of Ireland!

    • erikbloodaxe

      Shame it’s now no more independent than in 1916.

      • kevinlynch1005

        The key difference being that the compromise on sovereignty is ultimately now a democratic choice. We may not agree with it, but hey, that’s democracy.

        • mehercle

          What ? No votes in Ireland in 1918 ?

          Was it not part of the United Kingdom ? Did it not elect Members of Parliament ?
          It probably had a more democratic government then than it has now .

          • kevinlynch1005

            Yes but the problem was the elected representatives were answerable to a foreign parliament, where they would be, and indeed were, outvoted on matters of self-determination.Not an entirely satisfactory solution.

          • mehercle

            And being subject to the whims of Merkel and assorted eurocrats is more democratic ?

            I realise that Irish nationalists regard the Scots , English and Welsh as foreigners . Most of us don’t see it that way .

      • Jackthesmilingblack

        Give me the Irish Republican Army
        Give me the green, white and gold every time
        Give the three leaf shamrock if Ireland
        A land I love that’s so divine.

        • Maxwell Frere

          If I could give you the I.R.A. I would but, alas, am not in a position to do so. What would you do with it, anyway?

          • mehercle

            I can think of a few things .

          • Jackthesmilingblack

            Perhaps the next line will strike a chord:
            “We’ll send the Brits all back to where they came from …”

          • Maxwell Frere

            Does that apply to you, too? Are they going to send you back to us? God forbid!

          • Jackthesmilingblack

            I’d slit my wrists before I’d return to UK. Does that answer your question? When you’r gone, stay gone.
            Jack, the Japan Alps Brit

    • Jackthesmilingblack

      Side by side, young and old
      Fighting day by day
      We’re the army of the people
      The Official IRA.

  • “The National Museum of Ireland’s new exhibition, Proclaiming a Republic, is packed with objects from the 1916 rebellion that tell both sides of the story sensitively and poignantly”

    The National Museum of Ireland forgot the third – and real – side of the story…

    The Marxist inspired/British SIS (Secret Intelligence Service) mounted and controlled ‘Easter Rebellion’ operation was met with indifference if not disdain by the general Irish population of the day. The operation a failure, Parliament stepped up the pressure to weaken the British Empire by passing the Military Service Act of 1918 which imposed conscription on the Irish. This blatantly self-destructive law made Irish irate, galvanizing “…support for political parties which advocated Irish separatism and influenced events in the lead-up to the Irish War of Independence.”

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conscription_Crisis_of_1918

    It would be another nine months after Parliament’s second attempt at agitation to bring about rebellion in Ireland that the Irish War for Independence took place…

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Irish_War_of_Independence

    …ending in 1921 with a negotiated settlement, but thereafter weakening the British Empire by denying the empire its Catholic Irish regiments.

    For more on this topic of the Marxist co-option of the West, see the article, “The Marxist Co-Option Of History And The Use Of The Scissors Strategy To Manipulate History Towards The Goal Of Marxist Liberation” …

    https://sites.google.com/site/deanjackson60/the-marxist-co-option-of-history-and-the-use-of-the-scissors-strategy-to-manipulate-history-towards-the-goal-of-marxist-liberation

    • Sarkastracus

      Beyond barmy.

      • “Beyond barmy.”

        When did Dublin alert the world to the fake ‘collapse’ of the USSR? When did Dublin call for the verification of the ‘collapse’ of the USSR, the West’s survival depending on verification should the ‘collapse’ be a ruse. Going back to World War I:

        (1) How did the Bolshevik Central Committee know that the Allies wouldn’t send a naval expeditionary force to overthrow the Bolsheviks in Petrograd, thereby returning Russia to the war?

        (2) How did the Bolshevik Central Committee know that the Allies would send the Czechoslovak Legion 6,000 miles across Russia to Vladivostok instead of sending the legion 700 miles north to Petrograd to topple the Bolshevik coup?

        (3) How did the Bolshevik Central Committee know that the leadership of the Russian Army – which was still entirely made up of aristocratic, Russian Orthodox, officers – would obey Bolshevik orders and (1) not topple the Bolshevik coup; and (2) obey the order to demobilize the Russian Army?

        The Bolshevik coup in Petrograd would never have taken place unless the Bolshevik Central Committee was assured those three questions were taken care of…

        https://sites.google.com/site/deanjackson60/the-marxist-co-option-of-history-and-the-use-of-the-scissors-strategy-to-manipulate-history-towards-the-goal-of-marxist-liberation

        • Discuscutter

          It was the widespread availability of modern rifles that ended the British Empire, when Soldiers were fighting people with bows, spears and barrel loaded muskets it was easy, when they shot in to unarmed crowds it was easy but when fire could be returned the British Empire started to collapse.

          • “It was the widespread availability of modern rifles that ended the British Empire, when Soldiers were fighting people with bows, spears and barrel loaded muskets it was easy, when they shot in to unarmed crowds it was easy but when fire could be returned the British Empire started to collapse.”

            And where did the hostile natives get the guns and training from?

          • Flatdog

            Although we called it Peking in those days.

          • Discuscutter

            You are mentally unwell, delusional, probably schizophrenic. If you do not know where they got the guns from the you obviously haven’t even a cursory understanding of history.

          • Sarkastracus

            I think all this ‘Marxist’ language is a code word which would otherwise lead to a swift block and ban.

          • Discuscutter

            I think it might actually just be Marxists, it is delusional stuff either way.

          • “I think it might actually just be Marxists, it is delusional stuff either way.”

            (1) Did the West VERIFY the ‘collapse’ of the USSR? Yes or no.

            (2) How many celebrations took place throughout the USSR when the USSR officially dissolved itself on December 26, 1991?

            (3) During the Yugoslav Balkan Wars (1991 – 2001), of the FOUR groups present in Yugoslavia – Catholic, Orthodox, Muslim and Marxist – what group wasn’t touched?

            The delusion (and ignorance) is yours!

          • “…probably schizophrenic.”

            I took the red pill Morpheus offered me, which allows me to see the Soviet emblem–the Soviet Red Star emblem–still on Russian military aircraft and naval vessels…

            http://www.airliners.net/photo/Russia—Air/Sukhoi-Su-25SM/1606418/L/

            http://flashtrafficblog.wordpress.com/2013/06/08/9225/

            I also see the thousands of hated statues to Lenin still standing in Russian cities, towns and villages…

            http://www.saint-petersburg.com/monuments/ploshchad-lenina/

            The red pill also allows one to comprehend the meaning of the following…

            ‘The West never verified the collapse of the USSR because no collapse occurred, since if a real collapse had occurred the West would have verified it, since the survival of the West depends on verification. Conversely, this proves that the political parties of the West were co-opted by Marxists long before the fraudulent collapse of the USSR, since the survival of the West depends on verification.’

            …and…

            ‘When Soviet citizens were liberated from up to 74 years of horrific Marxist oppression on December 26, 1991 there were ZERO celebrations throughout the USSR, proving (1) the “collapse” of the USSR was a strategic ruse; and (2) the political parties of the West were already co-opted by Marxists, otherwise the USSR (and East Bloc nations) couldn’t have gotten away with the ruse.’

            …and…

            ‘…the ‘freed’ Soviets and West also never (1) de-Communized the Soviet Armed Forces of its Communist Party officer corps, which was 90% officered by Communist Party members; and (2) arrested/de-mobilized the 6-million vigilantes that assisted the Soviet Union’s Ministry of the Interior and police control the populations of the larger cities during the period of ‘Perestroika’ (1986-1991)!’

            …and…

            ‘There can be no collapse of the USSR (or East Bloc nations) without…

            Verification, De-Communization and De-mobilization.’

            Would you like me to ask Morpheus to contact you, so that you too may take the red pill and disconnect yourself from the Matrix?

          • Flatdog

            You make it sound so simple.

          • mehercle

            No . It was the post-war shift in political power and prestige .

            The spears and bows and arrows bit is incorrect as well . Just look at the Zulu War . In the Sikh Wars the Sikh army was better equipped than we were and drilled by French officers .

            Also , when it comes down to it , 500 spears beat 50 rifles more often than not .

        • Sarkastracus

          Verbose barmy as proven.

  • Jacobi

    The quicker the anniversary of the Irish Easter rebellion comes and goes the better.

    There is one word that sums it up. Treachery.

    Treachery to the Irish people, to the British State and French states in their war with the Prussian/Ottoman Turks, to the British army dieing in their thousands on the Somme battlefield and in a very special; way, treachery to the 80,000 Irish soldiers who were also engaged in that war and who lost some 4,000 dead in that battle.

    The Irish were promised everything and more by Gladstone et al than they eventually got in 1922. But the result of that treachery was a century of subsequent misery and death, still going on today, all of which would have been avoided.

    • Discuscutter

      Your comment shows why history should be mandatory in School and people also need to be encouraged to read books.

      • Flatdog

        A lot depends on where you learn the history and who writes the books. History looks different depending on where you observe it from.

        • “A lot depends on where you learn the history and who writes the books.”

          Yes, but thinking can divert one onto new avenues of insight.

          • mehercle

            In 1917 -18 the Germans controlled the Baltic . No British ships would even attempt The Sound .
            The Czech Legion were not under the command of any Allied power and I’m sure they all just wanted to go home .
            The Bolshies seized the opportunity . Many Russian officers opposed them .
            Just some initial thoughts .

          • “In 1917 -18 the Germans controlled the Baltic . No British ships would even attempt The Sound .”

            The German High Seas Fleet was effectively bottled up in their North Sea ports by the British Royal Navy. German naval vessels in the Baltic Sea were few, and when Germany mounted major operations in the Baltic, North sea assets had to ‘breakout’ of their ports to supplement their Baltic counterparts.

        • mehercle

          True , to an extent , Flatdog , but when you clear away the emotion and look at the facts and figures you can have a sensible discussion .

      • Jacobi

        My history, incidentally since you raise the subject, was learned in a Catholic school, in the UK, which taught religion apologetics, good science and also history. But we were also encouraged to think for ourselves!

        • Discuscutter

          How truly bizarre that you mention that it was a Catholic School.

          • Jacobi

            True nevertheless. Just shows how little you know about Catholicism.
            And you raised the subject, not me!

          • oldoddjobs

            How is that bizarre? It just isn’t.

        • Jackthesmilingblack

          Were the Crusades, Inquisition, persecution of the Jews, injustice to women, the African slave trade, forced conversion of indigenous peoples in Central and South America, alliances with Fascist dictators, child abuse in Catholic care homes from Ireland to Australia ever mentioned?
          Rap sheet as long as your arm.

          • Jacobi

            Jack may I remind you that this is a secular site and it is bad form to get into religious discussions.
            Lets just stick to the p[oint. treachery KSr

          • carl jacobs

            Jack may I remind you that this is a secular site and it is bad form to get into religious discussions.

            Are you kidding? Bashing religion in general (and Christianity in particular) is a spectator sport on this site. As it were. It happens all the time. This site is like an anti-religious free-fire zone.

          • Jacobi

            Well, I actually agree with you but was being “nice ” to the smiler. Personally I never raise my Christian religion but equally I never hide it if it comes up.
            Having said that I do think we should come back to the issue here which is the treachery of the so-called Easter rebels, something all Irish, including the deluded Amero-Irish, should be ashamed of.

          • carl jacobs

            Fair enough. I haven’t really a dog in that fight since my Irish ancestry (although finite) is rather limited. It seems to me however that the Easter Uprising wouldn’t have amounted to much of anything if the British had responded with wisdom instead of firing squads.

            One of those interesting counter-factual questions of history.

            Personally I never raise my Christian religion but equally I never hide it if it comes up.

            I generally agree with this approach. There are however some threads that require an explicitly Christian perspective. And there are certain times when I think an apologetic response is required.

    • “There is one word that sums it up. Treachery.”

      Jacobi, only a few Irish* took part in the ‘treachery’. What did the vast majority of the Irish do immediately after the so-called Easter Rebellion? They continued to go about their busy lives and their sons fought in British divisions. It wouldn’t be until Parliament two years later (April 1918) passed Irish conscription that the Irish became irate, then nine months later (January 1919) when the war was already over that previous November, the so-called war for Irish independence took place. So, as you can see, the Irish were well aware of their responsibilities towards the world, even when Marxist agitators were pushing the Irish to revolt sooner.
      —————————-
      * And those few were Marxist.

      • carl jacobs

        the Irish were well aware of their responsibilities towards the world

        And where was this awareness of responsibility in 1939?

        • “And where was this awareness of responsibility in 1939?”

          In 1939 one of the Marxist ring leaders of the Easter Rising and Irish War for Independence was president-Éamon de Valera…

          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C3%89amon_de_Valera

          • mehercle

            Granted the old Spaniard was not a Marxist , don’t you think there was more to it than his personal inclinations ? That’s without going into the socialist origins of fascism .

          • “That’s without going into the socialist origins of fascism .”

            Fascism and Nazism are Marxist fronts. Marxists utilize the tactic of employing false oppositions, more commonly referred to by Marxists as the Scissors Strategy, in which the blades represent the two falsely opposed sides that converge on the confused victims, neutralizing true opposition to socialism, thereby allowing the advancement of socialism to the bewilderment of the true opposition…

            http://www.attacreport.com/ar_archives/art_na_china.htm

            – As soon as the World War I operation had ended, Marxists began planing for the World War II operation with the creation of that war’s two false opposition fronts, the National Socialist German Workers’ Party and the National Fascist Party in Italy. Benito Mussolini was a well known and influential Marxist before the Comintern ordered that he take up a new identity as leader of the National Fascist Party. As for Adolf Hitler’s Marxist pedigree, one-third of Hitler’s SA, and later Gestapo personnel, were ‘former’ Marxists.4

            During the course of World War II Admiral Wilhelm Canaris, Chief of the Abwehr (German military intelligence), and General Reinhard Gehlen, Chief of the German General Staff’s intelligence unit for the Soviet Union and East European countries,Foreign Armies East (FHO), independently discovered that a group supervised by Deputy Führer Martin Bormann,5 second in command of Germany, was transmitting unsupervised coded radio messages to Moscow…

            “Our suspicions were largely confirmed when, independently of one another, we found out that Bormann and his group were operating an unsupervised radio transmitter network and using it to send coded messages to Moscow. When OKW monitors reported this, Canaris demanded an investigation; but word came back that Hitler himself had emphatically forbidden any intervention: he had been informed in advance by Bormann of these Funkspiele, or fake radio messages, he said, and he had approved them.”6

            The only way to ensure that fake radio messages were being sent to Moscow, and not the latest Wehrmacht movements in the Eastern theater of operations, is to have such radio messages supervised by intelligence officers vetted for counterintelligence operations. It’s one thing for Hitler to approve fake radio messages, but there’s no excuse to not have the fake radio messages supervised by experienced counterintelligence officers. To refuse to implement this critical standard operating supervisory procedure cries out treason, since even Bormann himself should have wanted to ensure none of his subordinates were transmitting sensitive information to Moscow. The fact that Hitler refused such elementary precautions informs us that Hitler & Company were Marxist agents, sabotaging the German war effort from Berlin. In fact, it was the winter of 1941-42 that Gehlen and fellow generals had assessed that the Soviet campaign was a hopeless enterprise “…not because it could not be militarily or politically won, but because of Hitler’s continued interference, which resulted in such elementary blunders that defeat was inevitable.”7

            Gehlen details Hitler’s sabotage of Germany’s Soviet campaign:

            (1) The General Staff wanted to concentrate resources on capturing Moscow, since Moscow was the Command & Control location for Soviet forces. Hitler insisted on dissipating the effort on three fronts.

            (2) The General Staff saw that the Soviets were going to entrap the Sixth Army at Stalingrad, and demanded a strategic withdrawal. Hitler vetoed this and 200,000 of Germany’s best troops were lost, including the loss of irreplaceable weaponry.

            (3) To replace these losses, the General Staff wanted to recruit millions of willing volunteers from anti-Communist ranks, i.e. Russians, Ukrainians, Lithuanians etc., “After twenty years of arbitrary injustice and terror, the reestablishment of elementary human rights such as the dignity of man, liberty, justice, and the sanctity of property united every inhabitant of the Soviet empire (insofar as he was not directly working for the Moscow system) in a common readiness to support the Germans. What could be more natural for us than to exploit this readiness?”8 Hitler’s policy of treating Slavs as sub-human sabotaged any meaningful attempt in turning captured Soviet soldiers into German allies.

            Both world wars severely weakened the security of the West by the deaths of non-Marxist military officers, who were replaced with Marxist officers. The Korean War continued this supplanting of Marxist officers for non-Marxist officers, and in the case of the United States was further exasperated by the Vietnam War, where over 50% of North Vietnamese soldiers (NVA) were Chinese PLA soldiers attired in NVA uniforms. As the globe turned ever redder after the November 1917 Marxist coup in Russia, the Marxist co-opted West naturally never liberated one Communist nation, and in early 1992 refused to perform a verification of the collapse of the USSR, thought the survival of the West depends on such verification. –

            https://sites.google.com/site/deanjackson60/the-marxist-co-option-of-history-and-the-use-of-the-scissors-strategy-to-manipulate-history-towards-the-goal-of-marxist-liberation

          • mehercle

            That didn’t work out well in 1941 .

          • “That didn’t work out well in 1941 .”

            What didn’t work out well?

          • mehercle

            The Nazis and the bolshies being best pals .

          • “The Nazis and the bolshies being best pals .”

            That was the point of the World War II operation! You’re not comprehending this subject, are you? Remember the ‘Scissors Strategy’? Marxists utilize the tactic of employing false oppositions, more commonly referred to by Marxists as the Scissors Strategy, in which the blades represent the two falsely opposed sides that converge on the confused victims, neutralizing true opposition to socialism, thereby allowing the advancement of socialism to the bewilderment of the true opposition.

          • Discuscutter

            You really are a historical illiterate.

            I wonder could you even find Europe on a globe.

          • carl jacobs

            I’m well aware that thousands of Irish citizens fought with the British Army during WWII. I am also aware of how they were treated upon their return. It is to Ireland’s enduring shame that Irish men had to leave Ireland to fight such a mortal enemy of Western civilization. Ireland – the only nation in history to prosecute its own soldiers for the crime of “Desertion in order to go and fight the enemy.”

            de Valera? A Marxist? Yes, we are all well aware of the close affinity between Marxism and culturally, socially conservative orthodox Catholicism.

          • “de Valera? A Marxist? Yes, we are all well aware of the close affinity between Marxism and culturally, socially conservative orthodox Catholicism.”

            When did the Vatican alert the globe to the fake ‘collapses’ of the USSR and East Bloc nations, as illustrated by the following two proof…

            (I) Communist control of Yugoslavia ‘civil wars’ gone unnoticed for quarter century.

            Secessionist Yugoslav Orthodox, Catholic and Muslim factions waged dirty wars against each other, neglecting to first wipe out the 9% of the population that attempted to do away with religion in Yugoslavia, proving the wars were orchestrated and controlled by the communist faction.

            Murder, torture and legal discrimination of those professing religious sentiment was so intense under the Marxist regime in Belgrade, that those who professed no religious affiliation increased from less than 10% pre-1945 to a bewildering 32% by 1987…

            ‘Like in most former Communist countries in Central, Eastern and South­‑Eastern Europe, the means and actions applied by the Yugoslav Government between 1945 and 1990 to reduce the influence of religions and religious organisations were quite effective: While there was just a tiny group of people who regarded themselves to be without a religion before the Second World War (less than 0.1% of the population), this number grew to 13% in 1953 and to 32% in 1987.’

            https://web.natur.cuni.cz/ksgrrsek/acta/2009/2009_henkel.pdf

            That 9% constitutes members of the League of Communists of Yugoslavia, the Marxist party that subjugated Yugoslavia from 1945 until the party’s dissolution in January 1990. Before any religious sectarian strife, first there would have been massive reprisals against the reviled Communists who implemented policies to wipe out religion in Yugoslavia. The fact that no such reprisals took place proves that the breakup of Yugoslavia, during the Yugoslav Wars (1991-2001), was manufactured and controlled by the Communists; and

            (II) When Soviet citizens were liberated from up to 74 years of horrific Marxist-atheist oppression on December 26, 1991, the day the USSR officially ended, there were ZERO celebrations throughout the USSR, proving (1) the ‘collapse’ of the USSR is a strategic ruse; and (2) the political parties of the West were already co-opted by Marxists,* otherwise the USSR (and East Bloc nations) couldn’t have gotten away with the ruse.

            ZERO celebrations, as the The Atlantic article inadvertently informs us…

            http://www.theatlantic.com/photo/2011/12/20-years-since-the-fall-of-the-soviet-union/100214/

            Notice, however, the Kremlin staged anti-government demonstrations that took place in Russia (and other Soviet republics) in the years immediately preceding the ‘collapse’, yet ZERO celebrations after the ‘collapse’!

            Then we have the West’s refusal to VERIFY the ‘collapse’ of the USSR even though the survival of the West depends on verification should the ‘collapse’ be a ruse, and the Vatican failed to alert us to the West’s failure to verify the ‘collapse’ and what that proves regarding the Marxist co-option of the West, globe even.

            For more on this discovery see my blog…

            https://sites.google.com/site/deanjackson60/

          • carl jacobs

            [blink blink]

          • Sarkastracus

            Blog bore. Next tell us how St.Peter set up the papacy to promote Marxism.

          • “Blog bore.”

            That only points a finger to your ignorance in failing to comprehend that a real collapse of the USSR would have been met by the West with necessary suspicion, where verification would have been employed. That being said, your ignorance indicates a more serious cognitive malady stemming from your non-shocked response to there being ZERO celebrations throughout the USSR on December 26, 1991, the day the USSR officially dissolved itself. There were supposed to have been thousands of celebrations! How did you miss that?

      • mehercle

        I don’t think , though I could be wrong , that conscription was ever enforced in Ireland .
        As for that being an excuse for rebellion and secession after the war was over , I find it hard to believe .

        • “I don’t think , though I could be wrong , that conscription was ever enforced in Ireland .”

          Conscription was never implemented, which makes one wonder why not.

          “As for that being an excuse for rebellion and secession after the war was over , I find it hard to believe .”

    • kevinlynch1005

      Home Rule was a promise that had been intermittently made over the preceding 30 years, but never delivered. Always some excuse or other. Perhaps that too was treachery? Arguably. As with everything, it purely depends on one’s perspective. And what about Carson, threatening to take up arms against the British state if Home Rule were granted? Technically, that was treason. But would he have been brought to book? For a hint, just look at how the UK government caved into the organised thuggery of the “Ulster Workers” in 1974. In other words, things aren’t as black and white as you make out.

      • Jacobi

        Irish Home rule got under way in 1870, after centuries of squabble, to the great
        indifference of 95+% of the Irish people. By 1893 it was firmly established as intent of the Commons . The Lords’ ability to counter was effectively dealt with in 1911. That was the then democratic process and three years before the war, you know, a real war with soldiers, including 4000 Irish soldiers on the Somme, being killed, you know blown limb from limb and bayoneted and so on.

        The rebels rejected the rapidly ongoing democratic process. Hence the word which best sums up that so-called rebellion, Treachery!

    • oldoddjobs

      The Irish people owed their allegiance to…. the British state! Of course, how silly of me to have forgotten. Oh, the British have kicked off a worldwide war? Come along Paddy, do your bit! Otherwise it’s treachery.

      • “The Irish people owed their allegiance to…. the British state!”

        The Irish people owe their allegiance to God first, which dictates all other inferior allegiances to come. The British too, for that matter.

      • Jacobi

        Yes it was rather silly of you to have forgotten.
        Suggest you go and read your history!

  • Flatdog

    I served in the Irish Army 40 years ago, and we used to double the guard over the Easter period every year at the barracks where I was based. The barracks was formerly the home of the 17th Lancers, a British Army regiment that served there on anti-IRA operations post-1918. The barracks is now sadly gone, a victim of the “Peace Dividend” that followed the Anglo-Irish Agreement, but the British cemetary that it contained is still there, and well worth a visit for anyone with an interest in the 17th or 17th/21st Lancers, as is the nearby Gunpowder Mill.

    • Discuscutter

      The 17th Lancers burnt Mallow town down, they were noted for killing civilians, they were a regiment of hoods and as the Times of London said after they lost their arms.

      “The accounts of arson and destruction by the Military at Mallow as revenge for the arms raid which caught the 17th Lancers napping, must fill English readers with a sense of shame.”

      • “after they lost their arms.”

        Lost their arms due to napping? You mean allowed their arms to be purloined, using napping as an excuse. How did the IRA know stealing arms from the 17th Lancers would be so easy!

        • Discuscutter

          If you knew or bothered to read up even the smallest bit of history you would know that they took their horses for a run every day at 11 and this was reported back to the local IRA commandant by several of his men who worked during the day in the barracks.

          You really dislike the reading of history, so much easier for you to make it all up.

          • “If you knew or bothered to read up even the smallest bit of history you would know that they took their horses for a run every day at 11 and this was reported back to the local IRA commandant by several of his men who worked during the day in the barracks.”

            The whole regiment went for a ride during guerrilla warfare activity throughout Ireland, leaving a skeleton presence back at Mallow to facilitate an IRA raid that was assured to occur? You need to read those history books and newspaper accounts more carefully in order to decipher what’s really going on. Irish nationals working at Mallow? They would have been presumed to be, at the very least, IRA sympathizers.

          • Discuscutter

            I read the books, I have even spoken, as a young man to the person that came up with the idea for the raid.

            It wasn’t assured to occur, what makes you think for a second that it was assured to occur?

          • “what makes you think for a second that it was assured to occur?”

            The whole regiment out of the barracks, that’s what. It’s ludicrous. It’s an obvious invitation to attack the barracks. There’s more to the story than we’re being told, or your IRA informer knows.

        • Discuscutter

          When had British soldiers ever fought clean in Ireland or most other colonies?

          It was going on long before Marx was born.

          • “When had British soldiers ever fought clean in Ireland or most other colonies?

            Certainly punitive expeditions (burning of villages and crops) were’t clean in India or Africa, but I don’t recall the summary execution of civilians or of combatants who surrendered. It was really outrageous in Ireland, where I could be walking down the street, minding my business, and a Black & Tan could simply shot me.

  • Jackthesmilingblack

    “Give Ireland back to the Irish…”
    Try, “Sell Ireland back to the Irish”.
    Surely Irish round

  • Who were the few usurpers who arrogantly spoke for all of Ireland that Easter Monday in 1916? The British SIS had its agents inside the various Irish nationalist factions, so how did the rebellion take place in the first place? For the answers to those two basic questions, see my earlier comments on this thread…

  • PARVUS

    I thought this romanticising of 1916 had been put to rest – largely, let it be said and to their credit, by Irish historians. Clearly, it’s a vampiric thing that needs a bigger stake through the heart.
    So, to restate some disgusting facts: much of the ‘fighting’ done by the heroic rebels was plain and simple murder of unarmed men. Starting with the unarmed police constable put on easy Dublin Castle sentry duties because he was so fat. His ‘Now, what’s going on here, boys?’ was met with a bullet to his face. And then to the murder of elderly and unarmed volunteer reservists (‘The Georgius Rex’ dubbed by Dubliners as the ‘Gorgeous Wrecks’). Then to the murder of unarmed market stall holders who wouldn’t surrender their barrow and thus livelihoods to make barricades. And so on and horribly on…
    Then the brave rebels met actual soldiers who spoilt things by shooting back and so they surrendered. Those same soldiers accepted their surrender and protected the rebels from lynching by Dubliners outraged at the death and destruction in their City.
    The exact same tradition of cowardly murder masquerading as combat has been carried on into the present day by the IRA. Commit moral suicide and ‘celebrate’ that if you want…

  • To: The Republic of Ireland

    Subject: The Easter Rising of 1916

    Proclamation: Turn your backs on that day of infamy, where British Secret Intelligence Service operatives posing as ‘Irish Patriots’ ‘rebelled’ against the Union. The founding of the what would become the Republic of Ireland was a cruel joke performed on the Irish, where the already Marxist co-opted British establishment was doing all it could to weaken the Empire, as proven the next year when the British refused to overthrow the Bolshevik coup in Petrograd (November 7, 1917) and bring Russia back into the war, Russia’s participation in the war being critical to the Allies’ strategy for victory. This is one of the many illuminating oddities of World War I that is not discussed, and for very good reason.

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