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Exhibitions

Why did Goya’s sitters put up with his brutal honesty?

In the National Gallery’s new exhibition, Goya: The Portraits, you see a talented provincial become a modern master

10 October 2015

9:00 AM

10 October 2015

9:00 AM

Goya: The Portraits

National Gallery, until 10 January 2016

Sometimes, contrary to a widespread suspicion, critics do get it right. On 17 August, 1798 an anonymous contributor to the Diario de Madrid, reviewing an exhibition at the Royal Spanish Academy, noted that Goya’s portrait of Don Andrés del Peral was so good — in its draughtsmanship, its freedom of brushwork, its light and shade — that all on its own it was enough to bring credit to the epoch and nation in which it was created.

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