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Mind your language

What parenting meant in 1914

And why an anachronism can make dramatic sense

10 January 2015

9:00 AM

10 January 2015

9:00 AM

‘Not still War and Peace!’ exclaimed my husband on 1 January during the all-day Tolstoy splurge on Radio 4. In reality he was glad to complain, as if it made him superior to the broadcasters. I quietly tuned the radio in the kitchen to long-wave and was able, while peeling the potatoes, to listen, through the atmospherics, to Home Front, the drama serial on Radio 4, set in Folkestone during the first world war.

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