Dot Wordsworth

Must Harry and Meghan’s son really learn to ‘essentialise’ race?

20 July 2019 9:00 am

‘Ha, ha,’ said my husband, as though he’d made a joke. ‘Here’s one for you.’ He waved a page of…

Lib Dem MEP Luisa Porritt in the European Parliament last week (Twitter)

The Lib Dems are wrong – it’s ‘ballocks’ to Brexit

13 July 2019 9:00 am

I agree with James Joyce on the spelling ballocks. The Liberal Democrats made their MEPs wear T-shirts printed with ‘Bollocks…

Who really invented the word ‘posh’?

6 July 2019 9:00 am

Two rules of grammar are certain: never split an infinitive and never end a sentence with a preposition. As for…

Watch out for ‘watch on’

29 June 2019 9:00 am

In Casablanca, Mr and Mrs Leuchtag resolve to speak English to each other in preparation for emigration to America. Mr…

The barking world of ‘doggo lingo’

22 June 2019 9:00 am

Doggy sounds childish. ‘How much is that doggie in the window?’ asks the popular song. (The song title used the…

How many words were coined by Thomas Browne?

15 June 2019 9:00 am

‘How many words will you use today, first used by Thomas Browne in the 17th century?’ asked a trailer on…

The tangled roots of ‘artichoke’

8 June 2019 9:00 am

My husband has been growling: ‘You cross-legged hartichoak.’ He tries it on obstructive pedestrians hypnotised by their mobile phones. He…

Just who – or what – are the men in suits?

1 June 2019 9:00 am

After he invented the term young fogey (in The Spectator in 1984), the much lamented journalist Alan Watkins coined the…

Why is a book like a sarcophagus?

25 May 2019 9:00 am

‘Is it like a packet of fags?’ asked my husband, less annoyingly than usual, but still in some confusion. I…

‘Bolection’ and how the language of architecture was moulded

18 May 2019 9:00 am

A pleasant menagerie of words grazes in the field of architectural mouldings (the projecting or incised bands that serve useful…

Do MPs actually know what ‘fungible’ means?

11 May 2019 9:00 am

‘No darling,’ I said, ‘nothing to do with mushrooms.’ My husband had responded to my exclaiming ‘What does she think…

A duck ducks and a swift is swift – so what about the lapwing?

4 May 2019 9:00 am

Some birds seem inherently comical. I can’t help being amused by the duck taking its name from its habit of…

Did ‘haggis’ steal its name from thieving magpies?

27 April 2019 9:00 am

Someone on The Kitchen Cabinet remarked that sambusa, as samosa is known in Somalia, came from Arabic. Perhaps it does,…

Epics are hard and dull – but today’s are ‘great’ and ‘nice’

20 April 2019 9:00 am

Spoiler alert: in Henry Fielding’s play Tom Thumb, the hero is swallowed by a cow ‘of larger than the usual…

(istockphoto.com)

‘Augury’ is to do with birds? That’s a flight of fancy

13 April 2019 9:00 am

Was the cascade of water that made the Commons suspend its sitting an omen or augury? When I asked that…

‘Shame’ is no longer one’s greatest fear, it’s offence culture’s default response

6 April 2019 9:00 am

In 1663, just before Samuel Pepys visited the stables of the elegant Thomas Povey, where he found the walls were…

Coining a phrase does not mean stealing it

30 March 2019 9:00 am

My husband has been doing something useful but criminal for the past two years. He reads the sports pages, mostly…

Does a dark lantern give out light?

23 March 2019 9:00 am

‘Does a dark lantern give out black light?’ asked my husband as if in delirium. He was reading a book…

Why the OED says ‘coloured’ is offensive

16 March 2019 9:00 am

‘The term coloured, is an outdated, offensive and revealing choice of words,’ tweeted Diane Abbott last week in response to Amber…

‘One fell swoop’ has become a cliche, but where does it come from?

9 March 2019 9:00 am

The Sun, reviewing a new laptop from Huawei, mentioned a combined fingerprint sensor and on-switch that lets users ‘power up and…

Where on earth does ‘kibosh’ come from?

2 March 2019 9:00 am

‘What is a kibosh?’ asked a German medical friend of my husband’s, when the word cropped up. No one knew,…

Can you really interrogate a plate? Credit: istockphoto.com

There’s a lot of interrogating going on – and not just by policemen

23 February 2019 9:00 am

My husband sat in his usual chair, interrogating the contents of his whisky glass with his old, tired nose. In…

What the sports pages mean by ‘marquee’?

16 February 2019 9:00 am

Ordinarily my husband is punctilious in keeping the pages of the Telegraph straight, especially when it is read by other…

Word of the week: Chronograms

9 February 2019 9:00 am

Jan Morris in her book Oxford enjoyed the Greek lettering on the floor of the rotunda entrance to Rhodes House,…

Names, like drink, go by fashion

2 February 2019 9:00 am

‘Sounds like fun,’ said my husband, wearing a hat with the sign ‘Irony’ in its band. He had read a…