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Exhibitions

Tate Britain’s Turner show reveals an old master - though the Spectator didn’t think so at the time

It also reveals a painter more concerned with the world around him than with formal abstraction

27 September 2014

9:00 AM

27 September 2014

9:00 AM

Late Turner — Painting Set Free

Tate Britain, until 25 January 2015

Juvenilia is the work produced during an artist’s youth. It would seem logical to think, therefore, that an artist’s output during their old age would be classified as ‘senilia’. Yet no such word exists.

But how else to classify the three blockbuster exhibitions this year that deal with Matisse, Turner and Rembrandt’s late work? These titans produced some of their finest art during old age.

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