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Exhibitions

We’re very lucky Philip II was so indulgent with Titian

The glorious results are on show at the Scottish National Gallery in Edinburgh

24 May 2014

9:00 AM

24 May 2014

9:00 AM

Titian and the Golden Age of Venetian Art

Scottish National Gallery, until 14 September

In Venice, around 1552, Titian began work on a series of six paintings for King Philip II of Spain, each of which reinterpreted a scene from Ovid’s Metamorphoses. The resulting work proved to be the apogee of his career and became what may be the most influential group of paintings in post-Renaissance European art.

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