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Ancient and modern

The Egyptians knew the value of accidental discoveries

27 February 2021

9:00 AM

27 February 2021

9:00 AM

The government has plans to fund a new research agency to back ‘cutting-edge science’. Ptolemaios (Ptolemy) I (367-282 bc), the first Greek king of Egypt, had a similar idea.

When Alexander the Great died in 323 bc, his ramshackle ‘empire’ fell apart, and the generals he had left in charge of each region promptly turned themselves into autonomous kings.

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