World

Republicans actually make better TV

25 August 2020

3:04 PM

25 August 2020

3:04 PM

Here’s a question no one will ask. How is it possible the Republicans — the party universally deplored and maligned by Hollywood, Big Tech, and all of mainstream media — consistently manage to pull off far better production quality in broadcast content than the Democrats?

This was fully evident Monday on night one of the Republican National Convention where the GOP delivered a sleek, well-produced, visually and audibly impressive presentation to American voters. Stack that next to what we saw from the Democrats last week, who have virtually every millionaire and billionaire in Hollywood and Silicon Valley on their ideological side — yet apparently, that support doesn’t extend to basic production, styling, or home office assistance.

On Monday the Republicans delivered a message of party uniformity and stability, touching on tropes to appeal to more traditional Republican voters — such as God, guns, and patriotism — and those more on the Trumpian base — censorship, cancel culture, and the left’s embrace of Marxism. Even former UN ambassador Nikki Haley, bookending the event and often not a favorite of the MAGA-crowd, echoed earlier speaker Matt Gaetz, the congressman from Florida, in addressing Silicon Valley censorship, cancel culture, and the hypocrisies of the Black Lives Matter organization.


Meanwhile, at their convention, the Democrats brought America a dumpster fire — or a parking lot fire, or a Wendy’s on fire, or any number of fires, really — when they appeared to spend more time worrying about the skin color of their speakers than the quality of the microphones and webcams used.  The Democratic convention, much like their party and actions on display in America’s cities, was a visual and ideological mess. That is to say, revelatory and unintentionally honest. Their four-day, anti-white, Zoom conference race rally was also just plain creepy—it was Pol Pot with a Sesame Street filter.

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The Republicans offered consistency and stability, not only in messaging, but, and perhaps more interestingly, in production value. Speakers appeared in one of two settings — the grand Mellon Auditorium in Washington, DC and another location in the capital before the same American flag backdrop, with only a couple speakers recording from other locations but maintaining consistent polish.  In many ways, the messaging was exactly what you’d expect from a pre-fab Republican convention yet injected with Trumpian barbs and trolls both from the man himself in the Oval Office and several speakers. That’s astute strategizing to both the MAGA-base, many who never considered themselves Republican or conservative before Trump came along, and those more traditional voters who weren’t so keen on Trump the last time around, but certainly have his back now.

CNN and the other networks tended to cut away for commentary when the more fiery and effective speakers took stage, like Matt Gaetz. Plugged-in media-watchers can expect the left-wing press to launch an attack on speaker Kimberly Guilfoyle Tuesday, who delivered an impassioned — shrill or unhinged, they’ll say — speech in support of the President, veering from what many are accustomed to seeing from the campaign adviser and girlfriend of the President’s son.

In a time of extreme anxiety, economic uncertainty, and a great divide between the party of the red carpet and everyone else, the Democrats’ convention was nothing more than a grotesque infomercial and telethon, each night hosted by its very own washed-up celebrity. Instead of solutions, they gave America The Burning live musical performances, convoluted theories regarding race or climate, and lectured on how awful our nation is and always has been. The Republicans, on the other hand, seemed to offer a return to something more grounded and tangible.

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