<iframe src="//www.googletagmanager.com/ns.html?id=GTM-K3L4M3" height="0" width="0" style="display:none;visibility:hidden">

Books

While Dutch schools ban birthday cakes, the British pine for the next Bake Off

30 March 2019

9:00 AM

30 March 2019

9:00 AM

The Way We Eat Now begins with a single bunch of grapes. The bunch is nothing special to the modern eater: seedless, one-note sweet. It appears to be unchanged from those which might have been dropped into the mouths of Roman emperors. But, Bee Wilson explains, the grapes’ sweetness, their lack of seeds, their sheer abundance and affordability makes them a wholly different beast to those eaten by our forefathers.

Already a subscriber? Log in

Get 3 months of digital access, absolutely free

Subscribe to The Spectator Australia today to get the next 3 months of unlimited website and app access for free.

  • Full access to spectator.com.au and spectator.co.uk
  • The Spectator Australia app, on Apple and Android
  • Podcasts and newsletters, including Morning Double Shot
  • Our archive, going back to 1828
Or

Unlock this article

REGISTER

You might disagree with half of it, but you’ll enjoy reading all of it. Try your first month for free, then just $2 a week for the remainder of your first year.


Comments

Get 3 months of digital access, absolutely free

Join the conversation with other Spectator Australia readers. Subscribe to leave a comment.

Already a subscriber? Log in

Close