Emily Rhodes

Kathleen Jamie’s luminous new essays brim with sense and sensibility

2 November 2019 9:00 am

There is a moment in one of the longer pieces in Surfacing, Kathleen Jamie’s luminous new collection of essays, when…

Jessie Burton’s The Confession is, frankly, a bit heavy-handed

5 October 2019 9:00 am

Jessie Burton is famous for her million-copy bestselling debut novel The Miniaturist, which she followed with The Muse. Now she’s…

Boer refugees were herded by the British into cattle trucks to be shunted into concentration camps at Bloemfontein in 1901. Credit: Alamy Stock Photo

Brutish Brits: You Will Be Safe Here, by Damian Barr, reviewed

25 May 2019 9:00 am

Damian Barr explains the upsetting genesis of his impressive debut novel, You Will Be Safe Here, in his acknowledgements: This…

The cruise of a lifetime: Proleterka, by Fleur Jaeggy, reviewed

30 March 2019 9:00 am

Near the start of Fleur Jaeggy’s extraordinary novel Proleterka, the unnamed narrator reflects: ‘Children lose interest in their parents when…

Kristen Roupenian Credit: Urszula Soltys

Kristen Roupenian’s debut short stories fulfil all expectations

9 February 2019 9:00 am

Kristen Roupenian’s debut collection, You Know You Want This (Cape, £12.99), comes hotly anticipated. Her short story, ‘Cat Person’, went…

Caught between fascism and witchcraft: All Among the Barley, by Melissa Harrison, reviewed

25 August 2018 9:00 am

All Among the Barley, Melissa Harrison’s third ‘nature novel’, centres on Wych Farm in the autumn of 1933, where the…

Crudo, by Olivia Laing, reviewed

30 June 2018 9:00 am

Olivia Laing has been deservedly lauded for her thoughtful works of non-fiction To the River, The Trip to Echo Spring…

Love and loneliness prevail in the latest short stories

31 March 2018 9:00 am

Carmen Maria Machado’s debut collection Her Body & Other Parties (Serpent’s Tail, £12.99) takes a confident straddle across speculative fiction,…

Françoise Frankel: a spirited woman on the run in Occupied France

27 January 2018 9:00 am

Françoise Frenkel was a Polish Jew, who adored books and spent much of her early life studying and working in…

(image: istock)

A choice of first novels

21 October 2017 9:00 am

Black Rock White City (Melville House, £16.99) is ostensibly about a spate of sinister graffiti in a Melbourne hospital. ‘The…

Mysticism and metamorphosis

2 September 2017 9:00 am

‘I frankly hate Descartes,’ states a character in Nicole Krauss’s new novel, Forest Dark: ‘The more he talks about following…

Books aren’t medicine. They’re more powerful than that

30 April 2016 9:00 am

Who can forget the terrible climax of Howards End, when Leonard Bast is killed by a deluge of books? Death…

Hot Milk’s heroine has snaky curls and a basilisk stare

26 March 2016 9:00 am

With ‘both arms stretched out like a starfish, her long hair floating like seaweed at the sides of her body’,…

A bookseller’s guide to book thieves

5 March 2016 9:00 am

Notoriously, during the riots in London five years ago, Waterstones was the only high-street shop that wasn’t looted. But that…

Meet the librarians – and book borrowers – of the Calais Jungle

19 September 2015 8:00 am

Sikander and I are sitting at a small table in a small shed. The shed is filled floor-to-ceiling with books:…

Jonathan Galassi’s fictional poet made me doubt my knowledge of American literature

15 August 2015 9:00 am

Jonathan Galassi is an American publisher, poet and translator. In his debut novel Muse, his passion for the ‘good old…

The dark side of Delhi

13 June 2015 9:00 am

When Sara discovers that her husband died in India, rather than being killed in Afghanistan as she was told, she…

Melissa Kite comes out fighting. Again

4 April 2015 9:00 am

Madison Flight is a divorce lawyer, nicknamed ‘the Chair-Scraper’ for the number of times she leaps to her feet arguing…

The unexpected joys of working while pregnant

8 November 2014 9:00 am

‘You are like my cat.’ So I was told when eight-and-a-half months pregnant, just before going on maternity leave from…

L.P. Hartley’s guide to coping with a heatwave

26 July 2014 9:00 am

Those of us who have been struggling to endure the recent heat should turn to L.P. Hartley’s classic coming-of-age novel The…

Great literary tea parties (oh, and ours)

21 June 2014 9:00 am

Every summer this magazine invites some of its (randomly selected) subscribers to tea in the garden. Every Englishman loves tea…

Reading: it’s not as solitary as you might think

Book clubs

12 April 2014 9:00 am

Everyone knows somebody who belongs to a book club. From informal gatherings of bookish friends in living rooms and cafés…

First novels: When romance develops from an old photograph

22 February 2014 9:00 am

The intensely lyrical Ghost Moth is set in Belfast in 1969, as the Troubles begin and when Katherine, housewife and…

By the book: The NSA is behaving like a villain in a 1950s novel

18 January 2014 9:00 am

The continuing drip-feed of stories about governments and friendly-seeming internet giants sifting through our data has left some citizens feeling…

Lose weight the Muriel Spark way

24 August 2013 9:00 am

Those of you dieting your way to a svelte physique amid the flesh-exposing terrors of summer should take courage from…