James Delingpole

Why do the vicious Remain campaigners value emotion over reason?

21 May 2016

9:00 AM

21 May 2016

9:00 AM

Like a lot of keen games-players I’m a stickler for the rules. This is not because I’m an especially honourable person; merely a recognition that without a rigorous structure and a sense of fair play, a game can be no fun and winning can afford no satisfaction.

I feel much the same way about politics. Take Hilary Benn’s recent contribution to the Brexit debate, wherein he professed to have taken grievous offence at Boris Johnson’s use of the word ‘Hitler’ in an article about Europe. As was perfectly clear from the context, the reference was dropped in lightly and unhysterically in the service of an unexceptionable point. So the game Benn was playing there definitely wasn’t cricket. It was more like diving in the penalty area and appealing to the ref when the player who supposedly fouled you isn’t even close.

Is this a sensible way to fight a campaign? Possibly: we won’t know for sure until the votes are in. But if I were an undecided wondering where to place my X, I think the thing that would swing it for me would be the marked difference in tone between the two camps — with the Remainers coming across as shrill, prickly and bitter, and the Brexiters surprisingly sunny, relaxed and optimistic.

This isn’t what you might have expected at the start of the campaign. Really, it makes no sense. When you’re the odds-on favourite with the weight of the global elite behind you — Obama, Lagarde, Goldman Sachs, the BBC, Ed Balls — you ought to be able to afford to be magnanimous, jolly and decent. It’s the anti-EU rebels, the spoilers, the malcontents, you’d imagine would be most afflicted by rage, spite and peevishness.


But it hasn’t turned out that way. Yes, there has been some vicious factional backbiting between the different Brexit camps, I can’t deny that. The tone of their campaigning, though, has been almost weirdly upbeat: Boris larking about with Cornish pasties and angle-grinders; Gove batting off Marr with his effortless good cheer; Farage with his pint-and-fags common touch; Martin Durkin with his insightful, inspirational and often very funny crowd-funded documentary Brexit: the Movie.

Brexit: the Movie. With a title like that you’d know exactly what to expect: mostly middle-aged and elderly men, banging on about how much better things were when the atlas was coloured pink, all jingoism and xenophobia and thinly disguised racism. Except that’s not the film Durkin has made. (It’s free on YouTube or Vimeo, so see for yourself.)

Yes, the empire is referenced: but only to make the point that, contra the Remainers, our tiny rainswept island is quite capable of making its mark on the global stage without the help of its continental neighbours. And yes many of the talking heads are chaps of a certain age — one being me — but let’s not engage in ad homs or identity politics: let’s thrill, instead, to their glorious vision of how Britain might look when freed from the shackles of the EU.

Like Switzerland, basically, where the GDP per capita is almost twice what it is here. Or like the Germany which rose from the ashes after the second world war to become the world’s third-largest economic power. The way both countries achieved this is so obvious you wonder why all those economists who preach otherwise still have a job: by cutting red tape and letting businesses get on with the business of raising everybody’s living standards.

What, meanwhile, are the Remainers offering us? More of the same old same old. It’s an instinct I can well understand. The familiar is very comforting, as we learned earlier this month in another context from a man named Albert Woodfox who’d been released after 43 years in a Louisiana penitentiary, most of it spent in solitary in a 6ft by 9ft concrete box. ‘In a cell you have a routine, you pretty much know what’s going to happen… So there are moments when, yeah, I wish I was back in the security of a cell. I mean, it does that to you,’ he said.

I feel much the way towards the Remainers as I do towards poor Albert: pity and sympathy, rather than hatred. But this generosity of spirit is not something I’ve seen much reciprocated towards Brexiters. David Cameron set the tone right at the beginning, by making it clear to the Commons that the only possible reason Boris could have for voting Brexit was as a dirty, underhand means of becoming Prime Minister: an appeal to emotion, not reason. Since that moment we’ve had almost nothing but vicious negativity from the Remain camp: the scaremongering of Project Fear; the daily piling on of dire warnings from supposedly neutral authorities, such as the Governor of the Bank of England; the needling tweets and spiky, sneering articles from the kind of people one normally thinks of as affable and funny, such as Nicholas Soames and Ferdinand Mount. It’s as if the entire Remain camp has been infected with a virus which has sucked out all their joie-de-vivre, their sense of fair play and their lightness of touch.

They say the same thing about us, I know they do. But I think that’s more a case of what psychologists call ‘projection’. Certainly, the thing that struck me above all at the Brexit: the Movie premiere the other night was what an incredibly jolly, likable bunch the assembled luminaries were. They weren’t pretending to have fun, as you generally do on these occasions. These were people genuinely happy in their skin, united in a cause whose merits they had considered carefully and knew to be just. I don’t want to undermine my entire piece by being too much of a bitch here, but I’ve got to ask: is that really something you could say of anyone in the Remain camp?

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Show comments
  • Rik

    Dead simple answer to that question James,the elites are at the same time scared and outraged that the serfs dare to question their right to rule,real freedom,genuine democracy??no,no,no that will never do.it must be crushed by any means.

    • kitten

      Quite. They’ve taken on a bullying, sneering attitude.

      • Garlands

        ‘They’ have always had a ‘bullying, sneering attitude.’

        Until now this contempt for us has been well disguised but their
        true colours are now on display. ‘They’ are so full of their own
        importance, opinions, ignorance and hypocrisy that ‘they’
        have, until now, totally ignored us, ‘they’ are now responding to
        us in the only way ‘they’ know………by arrogantly telling us that
        ‘they’ know what is best for us.
        ‘They’ don’t and if for no other reason than that i hope, on 24th June 2016,
        ‘they’ get the biggest shock of their squalid little lives

        • kitten

          I agree entirely with your post. ‘They’ think we shouldn’t have democracy as they’re far superior to us and thus should make all our decisions for us. I view them as neo European aristocrats

          They also want to micromanage our lives. Presumably to infantilise us in the hope we become pliable so we don’t resist their anti-democratic take over.

          • The_Missing_Think

            I believe the EU’s origins can be traced back to 1066.

            They simply got very jammy with one little battle, and they (and their legions of good chummies), have been ripping the Michael ever since.

            It’s now well past time to re-balance that particular score sheet, (and they know it deep down as well, like King Canute’s unstoppable waves, it’s happening).

          • Uusikaupunki

            Then let us remember our Saxon forebears battle-cry that echoed from the shield-wall….OUT OUT OUT!

          • D J

            True,but let’s not charge down the hill to chase them as they apparently retreat this time.

          • steddyneddy

            Brexit the movie may well be all that’s needed to get us out.

  • maic

    Yes, I’ve viewed the Brexit movie and was very impressed. People made their points without becoming shrill and patronising.
    That can hardly be said for the other side. Their constant refrain has been that the experts and authorities know what is best for the peasants and the peasants should not ungratefully insist on having wishes and opinions of their own – such as the sovereignty of a country residing in its citizens.
    One of the ladies in the movie made a telling point. Decades ago women in Britain relentlessly campaigned for the vote on the reasonable grounds that they also were citizens and should have some hand in the election or dismissal of the people who governed them. I wonder what they would have made of a setup where foreign bureaucrats imposed laws on British citizens.
    While I don’t get a vote I hope that on Referendum Day British citizens will vote to take their country back. When you do put in place leaders and genuine experts who can make the necessary adjustments. Kick out those who are getting in the way.
    Switzerland is an excellent example of what can be done. You also have the example of millions of American Republican voters supporting Donald Trump in his efforts to remedy the deficiencies and incompetence of the established political class.
    They are fed up and they will certainly be out there voting for him in the Presidential election.
    Likewise I urge you to get out and vote Leave on the day whatever the weather, whether your feeling well or poorly.
    Like the First World War recruiting poster stated, “Your Country Needs You!”

  • Penny Henry

    Don’t cross the Thought Police.

  • jack

    That’s because deep down remainers are communists/ left wing who have an “all animals are equal but some animals are more equal than others” mentality and sense of superiority, that if threatened or challenged can only be defended through aggression and ultimately violence. Hitler, Stalin, Mao, Campbell……..

    • Santiago

      I honestly wish Orwell or a writer of his insight was alive to provide a literary contrast to what the EU represents to the UK.

      The current state of the Conservative party is an inversion of its ideology,
      and reminds me of a 21st Century version of Animal Farm set in a Zoo with
      Cameron as an ageing Lion accepting his captivity and Boris a Napoleon-esque
      upstart longing for freedom, intent on taking all the caged species with him to
      the promised land.

      In the end there can only be one leader of the Pride. This will get even more
      politically bloody before June 23rd as Johnstone smells an air of weakness
      surrounding the Prime Minister and he knows this maybe the only opportunity for
      advancement.

      Who knows if life outside the cages would indeed be better; yet is it not
      preferable to try, than never even know or experience what lies beyond the
      horizon? A comfortable captivity contrasting against the freedom and dangers of
      Ray Bradbury’s The Veldt.

  • Old School Liberal

    Part of the sneering attitude comes from the fact they are utterly appalled that the even have to have a referendum in the first place. It gets in the way of telling the plebs what is good for them. I mean, what’s the point of setting up an unaccountable, undemocratic, supranational body to consolidate all the power if you have to ask people’s permission. “They’re all idiots, of course we shouldn’t ask them, that’s why the EU is necessary”

    • TurnedOutNiceAgain

      Best comment I’ve seen for ages

    • SalmondFishing

      Peacekeeping, interbreeding, setting global social standards, delivering a visionary alternative to the obsolete nation state way of thinking (which no longer exists anyhow). Need more?

      • madflags

        I think Russia tried that in the form of the USSR, but it turned out to be a bit of a flop.

        • irina palm

          The United States of Socialist Rednecks, in short Obamaland.

      • stuartMilan

        “interbreeding”???

        • Rosenbaum’s Tinted Spectacles

          vous préférez inbreeding?

          • stuartMilan

            gosh, I’m jolly tempted. you Frenchies are so much more sophisticated in this respect 😉

      • Tamerlane

        Yes.

        Peacekeeping – tell that to the Bosnians.
        Setting global standards – name one.
        Delivering a visionary alternative – tell that to Greek pensioners rooting through the garbage.

        Nonsensical intangibles is all the EU can offer. All for a £12 billion price tag. Some ‘free’ market that is.

        Try again SalmondFishing.

        • Rosenbaum’s Tinted Spectacles

          Another pleb whose credit limit is maxed out.

          • Tamerlane

            That’s your problem.

          • Migru Ghee

            My dad says that those complaining about the money all the time are the ones who haven’t got any. Those who do don’t talk about it. I agreed with him and he doubled my pocket money on the spot.

          • SalmondFishing

            No, it’s your problem. And it’s not even your £12bn you troll. Now eff off.

          • Tamerlane

            Nothing worse than having your moronic argument thrown back in your face eh? Next time make sure you know what you’re talking about before posting cr@p. Serves you right. Hope it stung.

      • Zanderz

        The only countries who want to be in the EU are the basket cases who see it as their social security blanket.

      • Owen_Morgan

        “Need more?”

        Not from you, no.

        • SalmondFishing

          A European army?

          • Aberrant_Apostrophe

            To keep the Plebs in their place?

          • Rosenbaum’s Tinted Spectacles

            Full integration of financial services?

            Lifelong mortgage debt servitude keeps the UK plebs in place already! Look at them, they break out in cold sweat and fear when someone f arts.

          • Tamerlane

            Clench tighter then.

          • SalmondFishing

            The revolutionary Kulturkampf will swallow you up and spit you out from the rear, troll.

          • Tamerlane

            Certainly managed to squeeze you out.

          • Swarm of Dronesᵀᴿᵁᴹᴾ

            Best comment I have seen for ages.

      • fartytowels

        Peacekeeping like organising the coup in the Ukraine and almost throwing us into WW3? Peacekeeping like continually provoking the bear Russia along its borders? Peacekeeping like bulding an EU army? Who is the enemy? By global social standards you mean socialism? A system which has to be enforced by coercion and threat not free market economics is already unfit for purpose. What’s the interbreeding angle and why is that so important? Countries require the flexibility to pursue their own bespoke monetary policies and border controls, workforce skill balances, etc, based on their particular strengths. Trade fosters cooperation and controlled migration benefits supply/demand sustainibly. Instead of a monolithic one-size-fits all system that resulted in the 2008 financial collapse and the endless bailing out by the middle class of basket-case countries that should never have joined. Not to mention the migrant crisis and mass unemployent and social unrest. It is simply social eugenics. An Orwellian desire for control of the people. Even Gorbachev who dissolved the USSR made a statement that he was bemused why we wanted to re-create it in the West. And he should know a thing or two.

        • SalmondFishing

          So many words. Are you finding it difficult to keep up with modern day developments?

    • Pip

      Desperate liars tend to become aggressive when they sense defeat.

  • Teacher

    We have seen this bullying, sneering, contemptuous attitude before, in particular, during the last election where those on the left characterised the right as ‘fascists’, ‘racists’, ‘Kippers’ (uttered in tones of scorn and hatred) and ‘Tories’ (ditto).

    Their fury and invective on losing the election were horrible to behold. It has become ubiquitous that rightists are happy, contented, polite and tolerant but silent for fear of spiteful attacks and that the left, the green fringe and, now, Remainers too, are full of hateful, vociferous vituperation, never silenced by manners or consideration for the feeling of others.

    I know many of these people personally. They are the ‘nice’ middle classes who colonise the public services, charities, book clubs and other soi disant caring organisations and they are truly offensive. Why? They actually think there is only one side which is right and that, therefore, those who debate or offer contrary views are wrong and evil.

    • Pip

      Their privileged lifestyles and University brainwashing robs them of any common sense and blinds them to the reality of life whilst creating an arrogant sneering type of person who is rapped up in their own perceived importance.

  • veryveryoldfella

    I pray that the Remainers who exhibit this bullying, sneering downright vicious attitude get their just rewards after June 23rd, irrespective of the result. A good start would be to see the Conservative party elect a new leader, you know the sort I mean, a CONSERVATIVE. Dave can go off and play with his new friends Mandleson and Corbyn.

    • Richard Lally

      That would be interesting. Would the mostly moderate British public fear Corbyn less than a right wing loony?

      • veryveryoldfella

        Who knows, do you? BTW, what made come out with the phrase “right wing loony” would that be anyone who does not fit with your criteria? Is it your “go to” phrase, you are not left wing enough for me, ergo right wing loony.

        • Richard Lally

          I believe Mr Major referred to them as bastards and I suspect Mr Cameron has a similar view.
          I prefer the term loonies because I think it is less rude than bastards and it expresses my feeling that many right wing views are amusingly ludicrous.

          • veryveryoldfella

            I suppose it is preferable to be amused by the right, than scared by the left.

        • salt_peter

          The left regard an accusation of ‘right wing’ as an insult. The same with ‘facsism’. They conflate the two.

          In fact facism is merely another form of socialism – ie left wingery – that frightens Marxists.

          ‘Right wing’ means small government and minimal state interference, so it’s actually a compliment.

    • Pip

      Indeed I do wonder were a Vote to Leave will leave those liars and useful idiots in the establishment, business and media who have been shoving doom and gloom down our throats over recent months, with zero credibility what will they do?

  • polidorisghost

    “Why are Remain campaigners so vicious and rude?”

    Maybe they think that they are on the losing side – that tends to bring out the worst in people

    • salt_peter

      “Maybe they think that they are on the losing side – that tends to bring out the worst in people”

      So does threatening their power, as Galileo found out. And this referendum is a clear and present threat to all these parasite’s power.

      Similarly American secularity threatens the power of the Muslim clerics by seducing their flock. They do not want to become as relevant as the Archbishop of Canterbury.

      That explains a lot along with Muslim male terror of the emancipation of their women..

  • Cyril Sneer

    It’s just an extension of the establishment behaviour. Any party or person that is not of the establishment, that threatens the establishment is routinely attacked with the all the venom and ugliness they can muster. If they can get away with spreading vicious lies about someone, they will. They have the MSM and particularly the left wing to back them up.

    Slander and censorship, slander and censorship, that’s what they’re all about.

    It’s worrying because democracy, fairness, freedom of speech and respect for your opponents doesn’t even come into it. And I tell you this – their behaviour will not improve, it will get worse.

  • WFC

    The familiar is very comforting, as we learned earlier this month in another context from a man named Albert Woodfox who’d been released after 43 years in a Louisiana penitentiary, most of it spent in solitary in a 6ft by 9ft concrete box. ‘In a cell you have a routine, you pretty much know what’s going to happen… So there are moments when, yeah, I wish I was back in the security of a cell. I mean, it does that to you,’ he said.

    It’s called “institutionalisation”, and was the (expressed) reason why they closed down the asylums (the original “safe spaces”).

    But if that applied to the EU, you would be expecting older voters to be more inclined to vote “remain”, and younger voters to be more inclined to vote “leave”.

    (As was the case in the Scottish referendum.)

    • Conway

      Older voters know what it was like before we joined. They are also, like me, keen to right the mistake they made if they voted to stay in the common market when asked. They have been lied to and didn’t like it. They see the same stitch up happening now and are determined it shan’t happen again.

      • Leon Wolfeson

        Ah, so the lost lost days of yore, as you complain about the mistake of not blocking the world out… as you say facts are a lie, and are determined not to let democracy…

  • flydlbee

    I see that the government has lost a vital vote over the TTIP globalism treaty, with 25 Conservative MPs voting with Labour. The dam has cracked, and is now leaking. Roll on June 23rd!

  • ROUCynic

    Poor breeding.

    • Jenny Wren

      I’m surprised he found anyone to breed with at all.

  • Richard Lally

    This article flies in the face of reality as I experience it.
    Mr Delingpole, if you want to know how rude and nasty Brussels-haters can be I suggest you check out this forum!

    • MikePage

      You think we should cower like lambs to the slaughter? My advice is don’t start a fight you can’t finish.

  • herculesparrot

    Perhaps, assuming for argument’s sake that Delingpole is right, the nastiness stems from the exasperation at the Leave campaign recklessly endangering the United Kingdom’s future with its wild, unsubstantiated promises of milk and honey?

    • global city

      I laughed out loud then!

    • Jenny Wren

      “…assuming for argument’s sake that Delingpole is right…” assuming…how very dare you, he is a patwiot and you must be a twaitor….or something.

    • Freddythreepwood

      ‘endangering the United Kingdom’s future with its wild, unsubstantiated promises of milk and honey?

      Remainers code for – ‘Britain is the fifth biggest economy in the world and is perfectly capable of standing on its own two feet as an independent nation.’

      • kyle lynch

        Do you not think that it might be considered the 5th biggest economy because of Europe and the part it has to play. Also if we are so influential how come we cant according to the out camp utilise that when negotiating with the EU. Either we are strong enough to compete in the world and thus influence the EU effectively from within or we are not.

        • Freddythreepwood

          It is not ‘considered the 5th biggest economy’. It is the 5th biggest economy. You say ‘Europe’ when I think you mean the EU. To. answer your question, no, I don’t.
          Also, In response to your final sentence, I don’t want us to ‘influence the EU effectively from within’. I want us to influence it effectively from without.

          • kyle lynch

            No I mean Europe as a whole but why are you looking to increase risk by leaving the largest economy in the world to be the 5th largest up against the likes of the US China Japan and the EU.

          • Freddythreepwood

            Look, I have been round the block and I am perfectly aware of the Remainers tactic of switching the argument to the economy, telling a lie, keep repeating the lie, and frighten the wavering voter into voting In. The EU is not ‘the largest economy in the world’, but then, you know that. We will not be ‘up against’ anybody. We will make our own agreements and prosper, thank you very much. In the meantime, the EU will still be the politically undemocratic, unaccountable, dictatorial (ask Greece, Italy, Cyprus, Spain and Portugal), basket-case of an institution it is today. Our Paraliament, our Parliament! has just had to concede that EU Law takes precedence and that there is nothing it can do about it while we are in the EU. How on earth do I express my contempt for any British person who would vote for that?

          • kyle lynch

            Your longevity or how many times you have been round the block means nothing. The EU is the biggest economy by the same measure that the UK is the 5th largest.
            We are up against them, you think they will provide favourable trade terms for us why exactly?
            The EU is far more democratic and accountable than our own government objectively. Examples of how the EU has been dictatorial towards those countries thank you.

          • Freddythreepwood

            I have no intention of corresponding further with a Euro-Twonk who is blatantly prepared to use strawman argument and declare black is white and white is black.

          • kyle lynch

            What strawman argument have I used. I can’t help that you are vague and argue your point badly.

    • davidblameron

      no, not milk and honey, there will still be plenty of hard work.

      • kyle lynch

        Excellent so in what direction is this hard work going to go, what will you need to do, what do you want to achieve and how will you achieve it?

        • davidblameron

          just saying that LEAVE ing the EU won’t take us all to Heaven immediately, life will have to go on.

    • MikePage

      I think you are recklessly endangering the English language.

    • davidofkent

      Yes, there are a lot of wild, unsubstantiated threats being bandied about. Quite a lot of them come from the Governor of the Bank of England and from David Cameron. You can then add in the French Woman, Lagarde, who is apparently at the head of the IMF (for all the good she and it do). The one incontestable fact that should be heard is that we will regain our sovereignty when we leave the EU. Of that there is no doubt.

  • Spasticus Outisticus

    The remain camp have lost every single argument there is to lose.

    There is only one way OUT of the EU and that will be achieved by voting OUT.

    • davidblameron

      Or voting L E A V E even.

  • Al

    Where as threatening ITV for not doing as they’re told is a delightful way to behave?

    As someone who is politically engaged with a fair understanding of economics I can only imagine what a turn off this must be for the “average” man in street. Both campaigns have been far from agreeable with Remain’s efforts to fulfill the demand for unknowable “FACTS” by the naive, well intentioned types the worst.

    It’s like having conversations with your girlfriend about football every 4 years when she gets excited about the World Cup; she hasn’t really got a clue what’s happening but wants to be involved. I heard one man on Radio 5 say he had decided to vote Remain as he’d heard NATO would turn against us! Good grief.

    I remember being critical of Richard Dawkins when he suggested that he didn’t feel qualified to vote in this referendum but as this debate has gone on I think he has a point and my faith in the intelligence of the average citizen has been severely shaken.

    • MummyofPrudence

      Lord Elliot of Loserville is not a Brexiteer, he wants another referendum, because he thinks a vote to leave the EU should not be a vote to invoke article 50, but a vote to start a new round of interminable negotiations. The government and those who gave the official nomination to his organisation (most of whom had an EU interest to declare but were still allowed to participate in the decision, because there were so few members who were not working for the EU in some other capacity or married to someone who was) chose Vote Leave over Grassroots Out because they do not have very much support among ordinary people and consist of establshment Tories. It is Elliot who has thrown his toys out of the pram at every opportunity, he is an enemy within, he refuses to work with UKIP, he is a big spoilt baby. Cameron told Gove and Johnson specifically they were not to join G.O and be seen with Farage and Galloway. Elliot is the one and only disgraceful and unfit person working for Brexit and was chosen on that basis by supporters of Remain.

      If you can write a few sentences about how the EU works and how it is better to be governed by an anti demcratic system of elitist bureaucrats and philosopher kings than it is to be governed by people whom the demos have elected then make your case. We never read explanations of the benefits of non democracy and the rule of pen pushers and judges from those who wish to remain part of this unholy, muddled up, arrogant disastrous mess, only insults and questions about the sanity of those of us who believe we are capable of putting our own house in order.

      • Santiago

        Well said.

    • Fraser Bailey

      Yes, most of the electorate are so uninformed and so utterly stupid that they really should be barred from voting. This is why we are condemned forever to utterly useless politicians. It is incredible to think that Nigel Farage, the only English politician who has been right about anything for the right reasons over the last 20 years, cannot get elected to parliament.

      • fundamentallyflawed

        Its been my bitter disappointment in the interviewed electorate that instead of researching and drawing their own conclusions the constant cry has been “give me information”. Perhaps if we are so unable to think for ourselves that we need to be spoon fed then we deserve to remain

  • why-are-remain-campaigners-so-vicious-and-rude?

    because basis for Remain is a fragile deception based on hysteria with the entire EU a fascist fudge.

  • John Carins

    Stay in the EU and it wont just be rudeness: there will be a boot in your face forever.

    • Pip

      The only way the likes of Blair and Cameron are going to see the inside of a jail cell is if we Vote to Leave, to remain will see us lose our Democracy and Freedom, forever.

  • Bill Brinsmead

    Sorry James but you are incorrect. There is rudeness about, perhaps on both sides, but in general we on the Remain side are restrained and considerate (I comment as former Tory Association officer). Not only is it good manners but we want to continue to work with colleagues post June 23rd whatever the result.

    Complaints about process, postures, rudeness even, detract from the Brexit case. Makes it look like to are preparing to be bad losers when there is everything to play for. Lets just hear the Brexit case.

    • Conway

      It would be rather nice if the so called well mannered remainers actually put forward a positive case for staying – all I’ve heard so far is doom mongering and talking up the worst case scenarios. They have simultaneously implied that we are too small and insignificant to survive alone yet our leaving will bring down the entire global economy. Well, which is it? Both can’t be true. The Brexit case is clear; we want to be able to vote out the people who make our laws and control our tax system, have common law as the law of the land (so no double jeopardy and hearsay evidence, a return to the presumption of innocence, trial by jury, lay magistrates and habeas corpus), be able to say how many people we admit so we can plan for sufficient houses, schools, GP provision and hospitals, keep the pound as our currency and spend the amount we send to Brussels in this country instead, so we don’t have to close libraries while the one in Luxembourg costs ca £50k a book.

      • Leon Wolfeson

        Yes, as you admit you only listen to those with your views. As you oppose every single treaty… as you ignore the basis of the ECHR… as you talk about the evils of the Other, as you talk about the losses you’ll take out this country for the trade you’d end… as you’d choose to close every library, right, as people might read books written by a foreigner, why…

  • Foxall

    If we bring the EU down to human terms, it is like a house full of a couple of rich uncles and dozens of hangers-on who owe said rich uncles a fortune and can’t pay back. None of them speak the same language, nor hold many values in common. Meanwhile, gatecrashers are trashing the place and abusing the women. It is, in short, a bloody madhouse.
    And the Remainers who want to carry on living there say we are the fruitacakes? Give me a break.

  • Conway

    When you’re the odds-on favourite with the weight of the global elite behind you — Obama, Lagarde, Goldman Sachs, the BBC, Ed Balls — you ought to be able to afford to be magnanimous, jolly and decent.” Quite apart from the question of whether they were magnanimous, jolly decent people in the first place, they are clearly worried. Even when the odds are stacked in your favour, if you don’t have a decent case, you feel ill at ease. It’s very hard to be affable with your “enemies” if you suspect they are likely to win.

    • Leon Wolfeson

      You’re projecting from your situation, and your choice to be nasty…

  • Dominic Stockford

    An organisation of which I am chairman has a magazine. One of our stated aims is to defend the Protestant Constitution of this country (such as it is). Clearly membership of the EU is working against that. However, a man who clearly thinks himself clever has decided to call us ‘hyper-stupid’ (among other abuse) for writing an article in our magazine expressing our reasons as to why we think we should leave the EU. Why? Why on earth is the abuse necessary?

    • Aberrant_Apostrophe

      You should cancel Mr Cameron’s membership forthwith.

  • LG

    This article is pretty much the definition of a cognitive defect known as ‘confirmation bias’.

  • Jenny Wren

    …with the Remainers coming across as shrill, prickly and bitter, and the Brexiters surprisingly sunny, relaxed and optimistic…stick to being a food critic.

  • Leos007

    Dear people of Great Britain, you twice saved Europe from disaster and tyranny, please do it again! Stop Brussels dictatorship! Stop Merkel, stop Juncker! Vote Leave! You are our last hope for democracy in Europe…

    • Freddythreepwood

      Actually, more than twice, leos, but I get your drift.

    • Central power

      Tyranny and disaster. Another sunny comment.You have forgotten to mention the EU concentration camps.

      • Stan Getback

        “What, you mean no highly paid, prestigious and cosy jobs in the EU any more? That can’t be.

        People in Europe NEED us here in Brussels taking care of their, eh, oh, I mean, ….. money and freedom, You sincerely can’t want to stop the system that is generating so much good for the people”

        JC.Juncker

        But you are in Juncker’s camp , anyway :-)))

    • kyle lynch

      Apart from the fact that the EU is objectively more democratic than the UK well done for getting it entirely wrong.

      • Aberrant_Apostrophe

        Does that mean we can vote them out of power more easily?

        • kyle lynch

          Yes

  • congreve

    Jolly good, ‘Pole. Brexit is an Act of Rebellion and an Act of Defiance in the English tradition of Wat Tyler, Jack Cade and Oliver Cromwell. Remainders are like Charles II, flitting about from castle to castle, sneeringly pretending to negotiate, all the while dreaming of Absolutism.

    WE don’t need no stinkin’ argumentation. All things dodgy are sewer le Continong, foreigners especially. Give the rabble a plebiscitory vote and unintended consequences will surely follow. Mafeking night will pale in comparison to Brexiting night, late on the twenty-third of June.

  • Fraser Bailey

    The Remainers have indeed been vicious and astonishingly deceitful. On the other hand, the Outers have all toof often been incoherent and well…just useless, really. The whole thing lays bare once again the extent to which those who go into politics are as unpleasant as they are useless.

    It really should be very easy to create a clear messaging hierarchy to communicate the benefits of Out, and within that structure to communicate the many evils of the EU. And then get everyone to stick to it. I am part of many such processes in the commercial arena countless time every year. It really isn’t so difficult. But of course it is completely beyond the unpleasant dimwits who enter politics.

    • kyle lynch

      I have to agree that representatives from both sides are giving some seriously bad portrayals of their arguments and seem often hysterical in their approaches. I am a remainer and have to shake my head in bemusement when people like cameron and co try and posit the arguments that are meant to represent me.

  • Andrew Smith

    It’ called moral licensing. Those who are self-righteously convinced that they have the moral high ground and refuse to listen to other opinions think that they are licensed by their superior morality to use whatever methods possible to suppress everyone who disagrees with them.

  • Central power

    Sunny,relaxed and optimistic comments about Hitler and the Third Reich.

  • Lady Magdalene

    It’s very simple: the Remainiacs are incapable of making a positive case for membership of the EU, because there isn’t one.

    They have therefore resorted to lying: manipulating statistics; and a doom-laden campaign intended to scare and bully people, who know very little about the EU, into voting to remain.

    As they only have very weak arguments to support Remain – based on lies and fabricated scare-mongering, they have to attack the man, not the ball.

    Basically, they’re bullies. Arrogant, and with a sense of their own superiority. Cameron is Flashman personified.

    • kyle lynch

      Apart from protection of workers rights, human rights in general, environmental protection, support of scientific research and so forth. There is a lot we gain from membership.

      What has specifically been lied about because it is the out camp that seems to require the most debunking with their claims of uncontrolled immigration straining our services or that we have lost our sovereignty.

      • Lady Magdalene

        The UK legislated for “workers rights” in the 20th century long before the EU ever existed. We don’t need to be in the EU for “environmental protection” …. our own government is perfectly capable of doing it in the UK and inter-governmental bodies are perfectly possible (and take place) without the EU.

        We don’t need the EU to support scientific research: British scientists work more closely with American and Commonwealth scientists than European ones.

        All of the arguments put forward by the Remain campaign have been based on manipulated statistics and ridiculous scaremongering – like the claim leaving the EU would lead to war in Europe.

        They have NOTHING positive to say about the EU. Basically, like Gerald Ratner, what they are saying is “the EU is cr+p but we have to stay in.”

        No we don’t. There are only 28 countries in the EU and 160 outside it. We should rejoin the free nations of the world.

        • kyle lynch

          That would be relevant were it the early part of the 20th century however our current government has been trying to strip those rights away. Environmental laws wise again our government has been less than reliable in protecting our local areas unless it becomes a case of NIMBY.

          Our research is not supported by the government as the lions share is provided by the UK, with UK scientist warning themselves that a brexit would harm research efforts. Just because we do more in other areas does not mean that our working with the EU is not crtitical – http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2016/05/brexit-would-hit-uk-research-hard-report-says

          Well as there has been no war in Europe for the past 70 years and the EU along with other organisations playing a key part of it.

          We are still part of that world and we can act however we want in it but being part of the EU gives us a lot more clout when it comes to arranging trade agreements.

        • Central power

          You are welcomed to rejoin North Korea,China, Iran,Bangladesh,Somalia,Saudi Arabia, etc.
          NOTHING is NOTHING.
          Thus the abolition of roaming charges, or anti – tax avoidance legislation (just to mention a few)is NOTHING.

          • Aberrant_Apostrophe

            Ah yes, the abolition of roaming charges, which is leading to increases in tariffs or changes in contract terms to compensate the providers for everyone, regardless of whether they travel or not. Still, I suppose MEPs love it, given the amount of travelling around the EU they do.

      • Johnny Foreigner ✓ Very angry

        In your ” Apart from….” shtick, you didn’t add, No accountability, tax money wastage, the move every month from Brussels to Strasbourg, unable sign off their accounts, the imposition of punitive fines upon nation states, Schengen Agreement (Woe is me, the destroyer of mainland Europe). Yes, we gain so much.

        • kyle lynch

          They are just as accountable as our government in fact more so considering the eletion system and its adoption of proportional representation.
          Are you saying our government is 100% efficent with our tax because if not your point is moot.
          They have all been signed off and it is a myth that they have not.
          Only for breaching rules and regulations that they agreed to as being part of EU
          Schengen agreement was agreed upon to facilitate free movement and certainly hasnt destroyed mainland europe.

          • Mr Creosote

            …Yet!

          • kyle lynch

            What evidence do you have that it is even being looked at or comsidered in a serious light.

  • Freddythreepwood

    Speaking of Michael Gove – where is he?

    • davidblameron

      He’s just not as vocal – he does hold high office in the government, remember it has to go on governing after the referendum whatever the result.

      • Freddythreepwood

        He is one of Brexit’s big guns. A waste of space if he is firing blanks. He needs to be front and centre in this most critical of times, otherwise why did he bother in the first place?
        His country needs him!

        • davidblameron

          We can only encourage the many waverers to come down on the right side. How do you propose we do that?

  • ohforheavensake

    Aw, no.

    I’d just got the irony meter working again after Rod’s article yesterday. I used it to measure the irony in this and it burst into flames.

  • davidblameron

    BoJo was out of order introducing the late Herr Hitler into the debate. It was unhelpful to the LEAVE campaign.

    • kyle lynch

      It was a calculated move on his part and an entirely erroneous comparison to make.

      • Johnny Foreigner ✓ Very angry

        I disagree, is that still allowed?

        • kyle lynch

          Of course. Has anyone said otherwise?

          • davidblameron

            things might rapidly change from June 24th if the British are daft enough to vote to stay in the dastardly outfit.

          • Johnny Foreigner ✓ Very angry

            Every year, every single year, the noose tightens on verbal freedoms.

          • davidblameron

            Don’t be at all surprised if the voters are naive enough to stay in, it becomes a hate crime to criticize the EU

          • kyle lynch

            When has it ever become that. Puerile nonsense.

          • davidblameron

            see my reply below

          • kyle lynch

            Cant find it but please feel free to copy and paste.

          • kyle lynch

            Nope not at all. Name one time that it was even suggested that speaking out against the EU would be a criminal charge. If so Boris Johnson better watch out and so should farage.

          • davidblameron

            not yet but it may well happen if Heaven forbid, the remainians win.

          • kyle lynch

            How have you come to this conculsion? The EU protects your rights to freedom of speech and it is out current government that wants to curtail it.

          • davidblameron

            The EU won’t but Parliament will pass a law that makes it a hate crime to criticize Britain’s membership. HMQ would give it Royal assent with a very heavy heart.

          • kyle lynch

            Where is your proof that our parliment is due to put in place even a hint of what you are suggesting.

          • davidblameron

            because it would be a classic New Labour move and our Prime Minister is New Labour through to his bones.

          • kyle lynch

            So purr unsubstantiated speculation. Gotcha.

          • Johnny Foreigner ✓ Very angry

            Not yet.

          • kyle lynch

            When has it ever been implied or suggested or a history of it happening.

    • PaD

      Thats the opinion of people who can only digest the single word hitler when its mixed in with about a 1000 other words..theres a name for this condition: ‘braindead’

      • davidblameron

        He shouldn’t even have mentioned him, it was a lazy analogy in an effort to paint the picture of what is, true a dictatorial EU

  • Pretty_Polly

    Hello,

    My name is David Cameron of Brussels and Panama and my aim is to destroy Britain as you know and love it.

    That is why I have admitted over 750,000 migrants and asylum seekers in the last 12 months alone, why I support eastern extension of the EU and why I have done virtually nothing to stop illegals entering the country and remaining forever. I will of course repeat these policies this year and every year during my premiership.

    Up and down the country, I am told that my plans are working perfectly as people find they are becoming ‘Strangers Where They Live’ http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/immigration/9831912/I-feel-like-a-stranger-where-I-live.html and I am delighted my Defence Minister, Michael Fallon, has told me that our towns and cities are being enrichingly ‘swamped with immigrants’ http://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2014/oct/26/british-towns-swamped-immigrants-michael-fallon-eu

    As the ‘Heir to Blair’ and Blairmore, I am proud to be continuing the pro immigration policies adopted by my close friends in the Labour Party and to be able to develop such ideas to extinguish ‘Britishness’ wherever it may be found. That is why I have abolished many of the planning rules in order to build huge anonymous new towns and cities in what was the monocultural and unenriched English countryside http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2016/04/16/plans-for-thousands-of-new-homes-threaten-green-belt-areas/

    I will soon be holding the long awaited confirmation of my views and opinions that Britain should remain an EU member forever and I will personally ensure that the Remain campaign is full of lies, threats and propaganda to obtain the highly desirable Remain outcome, thereby wiping the floor with a blonde haired mop. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boris_Johnson

    As you will understand from the foregoing, I am extremely excited about the forthcoming abolition of Britain and ‘Britishness’ by my friends in the European Union who have assured me that a new name has already been decided for these very small inconsequential islands..

    Consequently, to further the re-writing of British history and the destruction of British traditions, they have chosen ‘EU Sector North West’ which must now be written below your postcode or your mail will no longer be delivered.

    God Save The President of the EU Commission ! Rule Jean Claude Juncker !

    Yours sincerely

    David Cameron

    Governor General EU NW – Designate.

    • davidblameron

      I catch your drift.

      • Avajam Bhutti

        Is very good first class anti EU drift no doubts there I say.

    • Central power

      My name is Pretty Polly and I have posted this drivel about hundred times so far.

      • Pretty_Polly

        Well if you don’t like it then it must be quite good.. 🙂

        • Central power

          hundred and one times

          • Avajam Bhutti

            So you recite without notes.. excellent !

          • Pretty_Polly

            Lol me too 🙂

  • davidblameron

    Go to any of the southern or eastern States of the EU and they all love it for only one thing, the cash they’re raking out of it ; as for the irritating rules and regulations, they’ll stick to them only as far as necessary to keep any visiting official from Bruxelles happy.

  • rtj1211

    Interesting now that you’re on the receiving end that you change your personality so markedly. Of all the right wing journalists seeking to hurl foul abuse at the Liberal Democrats from 2010 – 2015, you were the worst. Your rottweiler admirers blogging comments at the foot of your DT articles, when comment was still free at the Barclay flagship, were of course foaming at the mouth. But within the rules of journalism, you transgressed the rules the most blatantly.

    You aren’t in a strong position to demand magnanimity or good behaviour because your own behaviour the past 7 years precludes it……..

    There may be others on the Brexit side who can demand it, but it would have required them to behave with dignity and decorum from 2010 to 2015.

  • MrBishi

    Poor old James, on the wrong side of the argument yet again.

    • Avajam Bhutti

      Very esteemed Mr James put up first class anti Remain argument so what you talking about ducky?

      • MrBishi

        Lol.

        • Business Cat

          Good counterpoint!

  • DwightVandryver

    I’ve yet to hear one good argument, just one, why Britain should remain in the EU. The Remain campaign is based on negativity and fear, there being no positive aspects to it. For the average person, there are no benefits at all of being a vassal state of the EU.

    • kyle lynch

      Human rights, support of science, worker rights, free trade, free movement, tax avoidance laws, criminal deportation, standardised electronics, quality control of products… Etc

      • Pretty_Polly

        Human rights mean no deportation for many dangerous foreign criminals and free movement means destroying the beautiful English countryside to accomodate Poland etc.

        Vote Leave.

        • kyle lynch

          No it does not. It means that an accusation alone is not a reason to deport. Criminals can and are deported.
          No it doesn’t that is UK planning law which we decide.

          • grumpyoldrockape

            Criminals who have served a prison sentence and are EU citizens cannot be deported back to their original EU nation states.
            Just as if you are from Manchester and have finished a prison sentence in Wandsworth prison you cannot then be sent back to Manchester.

          • kyle lynch

            That is because the have served their time and are free citizens. They are no longer deemed criminals and are only limited on external travel and certain jobs.

          • Pretty_Polly

            Served their time does not mean they are not still dangerous which is why many judges order deportation.

            Human rights rules are a danger to the people of Britain.

          • Mara Naile-Akim

            if they are dangerous, they should be still in jail

            but hey… the tories don’t want that as it costs too much!

          • Pretty_Polly

            Given the huge flood of migrants the public doesn’t want, there are not enough prisons.

          • Mara Naile-Akim

            yes, let’s cut everything and blame dem furriners

          • Pretty_Polly

            Well it’s certainly true that the public doesn’t want them.

          • kyle lynch

            There are legislations in place around that. However upon release it is assumed that they have served their time. Also by your measure that could apply to anyone.

            How are they a danger exactly?

          • Pretty_Polly

            By committing the same crimes again as is repeatedly reported in the press.

            You are just defending the indefensible, human rights laws prevent the deportation of many dangerous criminals.

          • kyle lynch

            That just inst true, freedom of movement can be restricted based on repeat criminal convictions as is clearly stated in treaties and on the EU website.
            Those articles you speak of surround particular crimes not being recorded thus meaning they slip through the net.

          • Pretty_Polly

            The so called ‘right to a family life’ prevents deportation of dangerous criminals.

          • Pretty_Polly

            Yes it does. After trial and a guilty verdict it is often impossible to deport foreign criminals thanks to stupid human rights rules.

            People in their millions coming to Britain from the EU have to live somewhere and that means destroying the beautiful English countryside.

          • kyle lynch

            No it is not unless there are some extraneous circumstances they can of course be deported. What stupid human right law are you against specifically?

            No they don’t have to live somewhere they are not entitled to housing when they arrive at all and considering 50% of immigration is outside the EU leaving will not change that.

          • Pretty_Polly

            The right to a family life prevents deportation in many cases so you have no idea what you are talking about.

            So you want migrants to live nowhere. Well that’s another stupid statement from you.

          • kyle lynch

            Actually if you bother to read the legislation there is a list of exemptions one of which includes national security so your point doesn’t have one.

          • Pretty_Polly

            National security is not the same thing as committing crimes against members of the public.

            So you are posting rubbish as usual.

          • kyle lynch

            no it isn’t but it was an example of where your opinions just do not stack up against the reality of the situation. There is a list of times when that particular right is not applicable.

            As per usual you are not willing to actually do the leg work that forms an well informed opinion.

          • Pretty_Polly

            But your opinions are nonsense because it is well known that human rights laws prevent deportation.

            http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/politics/10419000/UK-Supreme-Court-should-have-final-say-on-human-rights-cases-not-Strasbourg-says-Chris-Grayling.html

          • robbydot

            “It means an accusation alone isn’t reason to deport”. It does where the the EAW is concerned.

          • kyle lynch

            Only when charges are levied and that is for them to face trial. It is not deportation. If innocent they are free to return

          • Robbydot1

            You’re flat wrong on that. Charges don’t have to be levied, request to gov. concerned, the person concerned often has no idea what the charge may be. Yes, they will be returned if innocent but in the meantime can be held for several years, no charge no access to solicitor. That’s not justice by any measure.

          • kyle lynch

            Nope not at all. The EU has a very good fact sheet on this put you can only be detained for 96 hours maximum without being charged. Once an arrest takes place then official proceedings take place like they do here.
            Then a trial must take place within 152 days.

      • Prof Raus

        You are stating the socialist (Corbyn McDonnell et al) position that the EU safeguards “Rights” by denying democracy. I realise that that is contradictory but that’s socialism for you.

        The position you and others express without having the courage to be plain about it, is that BREXIT would enable a future democratically elected government to legislate as it wishes and in accordance with its mandate.

        The Remain position is that membership of the EU will prevent the possibility of a democratically elected UK parliament legislating against their interests and that, therefore, remaining in the EU is justified because it prevents the possibility of democracy operating.

        • kyle lynch

          Firstly the EU is objectively more democratic than the UK. Our MEPs unless I am greatly mistaken do get a vote on matter San d we still have a representative on the council. Just because we cannot dictate what the EU does doesn’t make it I democratic.

          • Prof Raus

            And how is the weather on planet LaLa this morning?

          • kyle lynch

            Great rebuttal a master stroke of wit. Or are you just having a stroke.

          • goodsoldier

            Watch Paxman on BBC or BREXIT THE MOVIE, if you can’t be bothered to read facts about the EU.

          • kyle lynch

            Seen both and the Brexit movie was a joke based very little on actual fact.

          • goodsoldier

            You are lying, as usual. Lying does work, Cameron has learned over the years.

      • goodsoldier

        One isn’t allowed to buy a bonnet hair dryer because of the EU, one that doesn’t look like a suicide bomber helmet that is. They decided women shouldn’t wear curlers, only the Duchess of Cambridge is permitted. Only Yvette Cooper and Thornberry hairdos are good EU hairdos. High powered bonnet hairdos have been banned from the EU. Nobody was asked.

    • Mara Naile-Akim

      ok

      united we stand

      divided we fall

      globalisation favours economies of scale. If you want real sovereignty you have to be big. We will have a lot more control of our own affairs as part of a strong block than we would alone. Next time a corporation tells us ‘do X or we start a run on the pound’, how do we resist that without a powerful block of allies?

      • Pretty_Polly

        That’s why Singapore is doing so well economically.

        So that’s bye bye to your argument.

        • Mara Naile-Akim

          singapore is a tiny offshore zone

          and they have no sovereignty, none. They are prospering because many people can make lots of money there, but if they were ever not prepared to play ball, they’d be crushed like a fly

          • Pretty_Polly

            Singapore is self ruling and and prospers because it trades with the world and is not subject to stupid EU type rules.

          • Mara Naile-Akim

            no, it prospers because it is a tiny tax haven prospering off financial services. That sort of logic isn’t applicable to a country like the UK.

            and it’s sovereignty is conditional on allowing the world financial elite to enrich themselves using the financial services singapore provides

          • Pretty_Polly

            So now you are changing your story, so as usual you have no idea what you are talking about.

      • JJD

        There’s no need to construe “united” as “politically united”. That’s where the remain argument falls down. No-one is advocating a world where the UK withdraws under the shell of national sovereignty — a fact that Nick Clegg *still* doesn’t seem able to get through his skull. So you are in good company.

  • Business Cat

    Has PM shiny-chin elaborated on Putin’s desire for Brexit yet?
    Has any journo pursued Dave on it?

  • Tamerlane

    The answer to the question is easy. They think they might lose.

  • Pretty_Polly

    The huge British Election Survey poll of 22000 people released on Wednesday puts Leave 0.5% ahead which sinks the tiny ComRes and IpsosMori polls showing a lead for Remain..

    http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/politics/eu-referendum-outcome-on-a-knife-edge-according-to-new-data-from-british-election-survey-a7034751.html

    Vote Leave !

    • Prof Raus

      You mean the one the London Evening Standard conducted in Tower Hamlets?

  • Mara Naile-Akim

    ken livingstone. Compares zionists to Hitler. Suspended.

    boris johnson. Compares europeans to Hitler. Let off scot-free.

    you were saying?

    • Pretty_Polly

      The EU are empire builders so what are you on about?

      • Mara Naile-Akim

        I am talking about the fact that many millions of europeans died fighting hitler, and so this comparison is as offensive as the one Ken made

        but hey… one rule for one…

        • Pretty_Polly

          Many millions of Europeans fought for AH so your point is just zilch.

          • Mara Naile-Akim

            most of them would have been shot if they hadn’t. And I can make similar comparisons regarding what Ken said. Once again, one rule for labour, another for the tories.

          • Pretty_Polly

            Most Germans supported AH so you don’t know what you are talking about.

          • Central power

            Last free Rechstag election 33% of votes cast. for AH.

    • Prof Raus

      That you either can’t read; or you are deliberately seeking to twist the perfectly reasonable analysis that, amongst others, Bonaparte and Hitler tried to “Unify” Europe. Either way, on top of expensive socks, no booze cruises, WW3 and ISIL funding I’d say it was just another desperate attempt by a desperate bunch to cover up the fact that they have consistently lied, cheated and used underhand tactics to promote an indefensible surrender by Dave of the multiple white flags.

      • Mara Naile-Akim

        ken thought he was being reasonable too, and I am sure some people agreed

  • Pretty_Polly

    Mara Naile-Akim doesn’t know what she is talking about.

    She says.. ‘Singapore is a tiny offshore zone and they have no sovereignty, none.’

    But the reality is..

    ‘The Republic of Singapore, and often referred to as the Lion City, the Garden City, and the Red Dot, is a global city and sovereign state in Southeast Asia and the world’s only island city-state’. Wikipedia.

  • gerronwithit

    If you had watched Paxman trying to make sense of the EU last night you would get a strong feel for how undemocratic the whole thing is, and ferociously expensive. The monumental number of unfathomable buildings holding layers of Eurocrats with lackeys and functionaries to mop their fevered brows. The monthly sojourn from Brussels to Strasbourg costing over £100 million a year. Everything about it screams waste, extravagance and pointlessness. It is a behemoth churning out diktats from its secret engine room on an industrial scale, all aimed at creating a United States of Europe where voters in individual countries have no true say or vote on what happens in the EuroStructure. For those inside or on its gravy train, it is of course heaven as they are untaxed, unlimited expense troughers. I hope those Greeks who can afford a television or one not stolen by ‘refugees’ have the opportunity to see what their austerity gives to the elites.

    • Central power

      Have you read your own comment above?

      • gerronwithit

        Yes, I spelled ‘get’ wrong. However, I can apply it to yourself if you want.

        • Central power

          I did not mean spelling.

          • gerronwithit

            Well, bully for you! You do of course realise that you are making no comment, proper reply or sense? Here’s something to tax your mind. My stop time wasting!

          • Central power

            “I hope those Greeks who can afford a television or one not stolen by ‘refugees’ have the opportunity to see what their austerity gives to the elites.”
            Outstanding piece of prose.

    • Stan Getback

      “What, you mean no highly paid, prestigious and cosy jobs in the EU any more? That can’t be.

      People in Europe NEED us here in Brussels taking care of their, eh, oh, I mean, ….. money and freedom, You sincerely can’t want to stop the system that is generating so much good for the people”

      JC.Juncker

  • Pretty_Polly

    The Master Plan

    The European Commission has announced that, in order to streamline EU communications and meetings, English will now be officially phased out in favour of EU Germolish..

    The consequences for the English language are as follows..

    In the first year, “s” will replace the soft “c” as in sivil servants. The hard “c” will be dropped in favour of the “k”, which should klear up some konfusion and allow one key less on keyboards.

    There will be growing publik enthusiasm in the sekond year, when the troublesome “ph” will be replaced with “f”, making words like “fotograf” 20% shorter.

    In the third year, publik akseptanse of the new spelling kan be expekted to reach the stage where more komplikated changes are possible. Governments will enkourage the removal of double letters which have always ben a deterent to akurate speling.

    Also, al wil agre that the horible silent “e”, as in disgrasful, should be removed.

    By the fourth year, the publik wil be reseptiv to steps such as kompletely replasing “th” with “z” and “w” with “v”.

    During ze fifz yer, ze unesesary “o” kan be dropd from vords kontaining “ou”, such as you, and similar changes vud of kurs be aplid to ozer kombinations of leters. After zis fifz yer, ve vil hav a reli sensibl riten styl! Zer vil be no mor trubls or difikultis and everivun vil find it ezi to understand ech ozer.

    Ze Drem Vil Finali Kom Tru !

  • Shorne

    Reading this headline makes one think that Delingpole has never posted a comment favouring Remain in a column such as this. If he had he would have been subject to ad hominem attacks, insults and general vituperation as the reaction to this comment will probably demonstrate.

  • Prof Raus

    Today we have the latest orchestrated event by remain. Dave visits Abbey Road Studios and a host of left wing Luvvies (many of whom choose not to live here) write a letter (or sign a Dave script) claiming. “Leaving Europe would be a leap into the unknown for millions of people across the UK who work in the creative industries, and for the millions more at home and abroad who benefit from the growth and vibrancy of Britain’s cultural sector.”

    Leaving Europe – have JCB built machines big enough to excavate our Island? Can we be towed somewhere else, somewhere warm – South Pacific far away from the European subcontinent? Sadly I fear that the Luvvies are just talking heads that the cameras love, but rather like computer data it’s a position of Rubbish in Rubbish out.

    One thing does puzzle me however. The assorted Luvvies flock to the OSCARs – it’s the highlight of their year. Winning one or just being mentioned produces emotional meltdown and unscripted rambling. Are they now saying that they no longer care about the US entertainment industry? Or, more sinisterly, has Obama secretly joined the EU? Is Donald Trump actually Viktor Orban? Stay tuned for further exciting episodes.

    • Central power

      Have you finished?

    • mailbiter

      Why are you so sensitive about “Europe” being used instead of “EU”. It is perfectly clear what is meant and not exactly confusing.

      • Prof Raus

        Europe is a geographical term for a part of Eurasia. EU is a political construct. They are different and seeking to conflate the two is ignorant. It’s also rather stupid propaganda and patronisingly assumes that you, amongst others, are a half wit. Of course that may be true but, sensitively, I’d rather give you the benefit of the doubt and call things by their proper names.

        • mailbiter

          I know the difference – everyone does. It’s shorthand. It’s been used that way ever since we joined. No one is ever confused by what is meant.

          • Prof Raus

            I’m sure most readers will be delighted to know that you don’t think you are being patronised nor that you are a half wit. I think I’ll stick to calling spades, spades.

          • mailbiter

            It is not patronising to interchange “Europe” and “EU” in a political context. We’ve been doing it for more than 40 years, and no one is confused by it. Although some are sensitive about it, for an unfathomable reason.

    • Central power

      “Leaving Europe would be a leap into the unknown”
      Are you suggesting it will be a leap into the known?

  • Pretty_Polly

    Now the EU says we must destroy the English countryside for immigrants..

    ‘Migrants spark housing crisis: Now EU tells Britain to build more homes as open borders send population soaring

    European Commission report warned Britain heading for an ‘acute’ crisis

    EU report, uncovered by Chris Grayling MP, said UK needs 220,000 a year

    But it orders Britain to ‘boost supply’, instead of acknowledging migration

    Grayling said building so many would change UK’s ‘nature and character’

    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3599970/Migrants-spark-housing-crisis-EU-tells-Britain-build-homes-open-borders-send-population-soaring.html#ixzz49Bi8svhS

    Vote Leave !

    • mailbiter

      So having moaned that migrants put pressure on housing, Leavers are no moaning that the EU has come up with the idea of, er, building more houses.

      • Pretty_Polly

        That’s right, the public doesn’t want immigrants according to YouGov which tells us the public wants a ‘2 year total ban on immigration’.

        • mailbiter

          Slightly oblique response; you were talking about housebuilding.

      • Penny

        Perhaps at the expense of green belt. I live near a town that has, as a result of immigration, changed greatly in recent years. The green belt / farm land is now being turned into housing. It was a pretty area but now, not so much.

        • mailbiter

          I think that is the exception. Migrants tend to gravitate to urban areas, where the work is.

    • Central power

      “Now the EU says we must destroy the English countryside for immigrants.”
      Please supply the reference where “the EU” uses these words. Or is it just your interpretation?
      Well then don’t moan when others interpret Johnson’s words (actually quite unambiguous) the way they did : the EU equals AH’s Germany.

      • Pretty_Polly
        • Central power

          In the the article you are referring to I could not find the words “the EU” “immigrants” “destroy”.
          Talking about housing – in Germany virtually all houses in the countryside are build as self build. The councils (the landowners must sell through the them) will allocate plots to individuals – mostly residents. There are no Barratts, Taylor Wimpeys etc to buy huge blocks of land and speculate with them. But the British way must be the best way.Sleep well.
          PS I am not sure you have understood the word “interpretation”.

          • Pretty_Polly

            So why does Britain ‘need’ to build so many houses?

            Because of mass immigration the public never wanted, much of it from the EU.

          • Central power

            Utter nonsense.The number of the EU migrants is balanced by the same number of the British expats in Europe.
            The main pressure on housing: Greedy UK builders.Buy to let business supported by the Westminster. Arabs, Russians, Chinese buying houses as investment.Last and not least the immigrants from Pakistan, Somalia, Bangladesh etc. and their ever expanding families. Please let me know how Brexit will sort out the problems I have just outlined.

          • Pretty_Polly

            Utter nonsense, about 500,000 migrants net last year of which a large number are EU citizens, and the ONS has been shown to have under-counted by a million at least.

          • Central power

            You must have qualified from Michael Gove School of Statistics. Yesterday your favorite paper (The Tax Heaven Mail) was screaming 2.2 million. ONS did not under count. The discrepancy is due to NI numbers. You can get a number even if you spend a week in the UK. When you leave – the number stays.
            But do not worry the people will vote with their wallets – and these tell them to stay. Whether some will fall for “Who Wants To Be A Millionaire” game as devised by Johnson and Farrage remains to be seen.

          • Pretty_Polly

            You post more and more rubbish every day.

            It was the NI numbers which showed that the ONS stats were wildly wrong.

            Obviously the EU pays you to post garbage which is entirely appropriate as it is a garbage organisation.

            By the way, the BES poll on Wednesday had a lead for Leave, and it was based on a massive 22000 respondents.

            Hahaha, Leave is winning !

          • Central power

            Internet poll!? Give me a break! You indeed attended The Michael Gove School of Statistics.

          • Pretty_Polly

            More garbage from Garbage Central.

  • Symptoms of a failing campaign:
    1. Comparing your opponents to Hitler
    2. Claiming the media is biased
    3. Vilification of anyone with a counter view
    4. Accusing anyone you disagree with of being in the pay of your opponent
    5. Shouting down anyone who expresses a view you don’t like
    6. Hinting that the vote will be fiddled

    You decide whether these fit the Remain or Leave Campaign (or both).

    • Pretty_Polly

      Symptom of a stupid Wizard..

      Claim you have seen ‘with your own eyes’ the majority of the public laugh at Nigel Farage.

      • “A fanatic is one who can’t change his mind and won’t change the subject.” (Winston
        Churchill)

        • Pretty_Polly

          You post rubbish as is very apparent from your stupid statement that you saw the majority of the public laugh at Nigel Farage ‘with your own eyes’.

          Not to mention the pure nastiness you spew over Spectator blogs such as..

          ‘OmnipotentWizard

          Wizard rides off slowly into the shimmering desert heat leaving Polly laying in a pool of blood in the middle of the street while the music of Ennio Morricone plays in the background.’

          • Point proven.

          • Pretty_Polly

            You post rubbish over and over and over again.

        • Prof Raus

          Using Churchill to describe your own condition is rather odd. I think you need a new wand.

          • You haven’t really got the hang of these come-backs have you? Just turning round what I said is SO unoriginal. Have another go.

          • WTF

            “If ignorant both of your enemy and yourself, you are certain to be in peril.”

            You’re in peril !

        • WTF

          “The whole secret lies in confusing the enemy, so that he cannot fathom our real intent.”

          Works extremely well on you !

  • Michael H Kenyon

    They are rude because we are jumped-up oiks too clever for our own good/ racists/ poor people/ commies/ middle-class/ because they can get away with it/ because their gravy train is under threat (and we all protect what we think should be ours) They define the rules and the institutions are dependent on them. Historically, this is normal. Historically, it ends up with riots if the lower orders revolt. If you import some new lower orders so they are grateful, let the old ones die, and people are enslaved to their screens, wage-slavery, and the information is controlled, it becomes less probable. Managerialist fascism, as predicted by James Burnman in “The Managerial Revolution”.

  • JJD

    You say it yourself, James. The other side says the opposite, and it’s end of discussion. However, in general terms (with the exception of below-the-line comments, which can be vicious from whatever angle) I agree there is a marked difference between the campaigns.

    This is only natural. No-one actually likes the EU. Cameron himself, before the campaign began, said it is in dire need of reform. So the remainers are campaigning for something everyone agrees is fairly rubbish. It’s hard to look upbeat and sunny in those circumstances. Far easier to look solemn and grim, which is exactly what they look like.

    • Central power

      “No-one actually likes the EU.” Done and dusted.100% for the Brexit on June the 23rd.

  • Michael H Kenyon

    These people don’t like to lose.

  • Pretty_Polly

    Here is an example of an extremely vicious and nasty post directed at me from a Remainer..

    OmnipotentWizard

    ‘Wizard rides off slowly into the shimmering desert heat leaving Polly laying in a pool of blood in the middle of the street while the music of Ennio Morricone plays in the background.’

    • Central power

      Sounds like Johnson’s “poetry”.

  • Central power

    Johnson Hitler analogy is unfair.Hitler blamed the Jews for all the ills in his country.
    Johnson and his admirers just blame the EU and immigration for all the ills in this country

    • goodsoldier

      Well let’s narrow down all the blaming and BREXIT. Then we can just blame our own stinking lib/lab/con parties and kick out the gravy-trainers and careerists.

      If we stay in the EU, there is no accountability whatsoever because even if you vote, the EU elites don’t accept the will of the voters. Blaming everything on a globalized, inter-connected world is the kind of excuse Yvette Chipmunk Cooper spouts in EU monotone while Charkrabati looks on in earnest saintliness and pain. It’s sickening to watch the lies of the Federasts.

  • mailbiter

    One thing about the erstwhile editor of the Speccie. If getting out of Europe is such a no-brainer, why did it take Boris so long to decide his position on it?

    • Penny

      I recall reading that he waited to see if Cameron could secure any meaningful negotiations. And, to be fair, not many of those outside of UKIP who subsequently declared “Out” did otherwise.

      • mailbiter

        Actually, I meant the extended period after the negotiations had been concluded. Boris knew that long, long before decided what was best for his career prospects the country.

        • Penny

          Again – be fair, if Boris is angling for career prospects then he isn’t in a club of one, is he?

          • mailbiter

            I never see the poor behaviour of others – whataboutery – as justification.

  • Pretty_Polly

    How dishonest of David Cameron to tell a load of lies about renegotiation and ‘ruling nothing out’ when in reality he was cosying up to big business and ruling out leaving the EU no matter what.

    Thereby demonstrating that it is traditional for Britain’s EU membership to be based on a continued flow of big fat porkies, which is entirely appropriate in Dave’s case..

  • 1234567890

    Magnanimous? The grubby, greedy group who’ve engineered this massive Illegal Alien invasion are and always have been, a classless bunch.

  • mailbiter

    Dellingpole skips over the in-fighting between the rival Leave camps. The divisions are more that superficial – the cut to the heart of what Brexit would look like.

    Vote Leave (e.g. Hannan) are all for the EFTA and free movement. Leave EU (e.g. Farage) are not.

    So which is it going to be, chaps? Make your minds up and agree on a position.

  • Pretty_Polly

    According to the latest research, immigration costs Britain £17 billion every year..

    ‘£17bn, the true cost of immigration to the UK every year: Figure calculated as gap between amount migrants pay in taxes and consume in public services

    The figure includes a £1.2billion annual net cost of migrants from Europe

    They consume more in public services and benefits than they pay in taxes

    Report was seized on by campaigners for Britain to leave the EU’.

    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3593872/17bn-true-cost-immigration-UK-year.html#ixzz48u5AVYxl

    Vote Leave !

    • Central power

      Please let us now how Brexit will save the £ 16 million left. You have said it: the EU immigration is not a problem – it is the other immigration. Sounds like The Mail shot itself in the foot

      • Pretty_Polly

        Sounds like you are posting even more garbage than usual you mean.

        How much does the EU pay you to spew so much rubbish?

    • kyle lynch

      EU immigration is a net boon to the economy as the research from UCL has shown time and time again. It is the immigration outside of Europe the one that we directly control is the one that costs us more than it brings in….

      https://www.ucl.ac.uk/news/news-articles/1114/051114-economic-impact-EU-immigration

      • Pretty_Polly

        I’m surprised you’re still pushing that long ago discredited rubbish..

        http://www.civitas.org.uk/press/schoolboy-errors-in-ucl-immigration-report/

        • kyle lynch

          So this UCL professor has published a counter argument then showing specifically where they went wrong. Vague notions of they didn’t use the data correctly or that they made assumptions is not really good enough. Especially as he hasnt published his counter findings.

          • Pretty_Polly

            How much do you get paid by the EU to post so much rubbishy propaganda?

            http://www.migrationwatchuk.org/briefing-paper/329

          • kyle lynch

            No eu involvement but if you can’t debate like an adult then maybe you should abstain from the forum. Ad hominem fallacies tend to mean you lose the argument

          • Pretty_Polly

            Oh come on.

            You’re trawling around old posts and often posting misleading rubbish so my question is perfectly reasonable.

            As to arguments, I haven’t yet seen you post one which is accurate or genuine.

          • kyle lynch

            In what sense. I read through a post that was less than 24 hours and applied a comment. Hardly trawling is it.

            My arguments are backed up by published peer reviewed research. You had one statistician making a comment to a think tank. Or an article from the Daily Mail that has no citation.

            So yeah your question shows your weak position and petty

          • Pretty_Polly

            People do not normally trawl through old posts so your sudden interest in something I posted yesterday looks very suspicious. Added to which is your endless pro EU propaganda.

            Peer reviewed means nothing. Not infrequently there are so called peer reviewed studies on the same subject with opposite outcomes.

            MigrationWatch and Civitas are renowned sources of data, you dislike them of course because they contradict what you have to say.

  • Bert

    Being rude, sneery and superior was the New Labour technique of rubbishing “other” opinions. It has been very successful in supressing open debate and creating sacred cows and vested interests like the ROP, NHS, BBC and now the EU.
    Their gravy train is under threat and they are getting all New Labour.

  • congreve

    There once was a Boris called B*goff
    Who declaimed that the EU was Ripoff;
    But to his dismay, despite Brexit day,
    The Voters told Boris to S*doff.

    — from the Bullingdon Book of Limericks.

    • mailbiter

      Would that be the Boris that won the prize offered by the magazine he used to edit?

    • Central power

      Boris rude? Never.

  • johnb1945

    Malcontents.

    What do you expect? Most people don’t understand the EU, our relationship with it and what may or may not happen if we remain or leave. And they want someone to tell them, either way. And nobody can.

    My opinion that David Cameron is a dull, improvident technocrat and that Boris Johnson is a blithering, opportunist cynic has been reinforced.

    Other than that, I take little note of the campaigning. Worthless rabble rousing and counter rabble rousing guff.

    Which makes me a malcontent also, but there you go.

    • Ludwig Apsel Weber

      We don’t understand the EU or our relationship with it, so the best thing to do is stay in it until we found out what it is. Or something. You’ve noticed that politicians are scoundrels, too. What a malcontented snowflake you are.

  • Central power

    “The population the size of Scotland will come from Europe to the UK.”
    Sounds like Project Fear.It is Project Fear.
    No it is not Project Fear, because this has been said by that lovely, cuddly, gentle, nice, pleasant man of the highest integrity our Saint Brexitorus Michael Gove.

    • Central power

      Actually it is lies and Gove knows that very well.He knows that Turkey’s accession is a non starter. It would only happen over the dead bodies of the Poles, the Czechs, the Bulgarians,the Hungarians who all historically witnessed the Turkish invasion.Prime Minister Johnson and his Foreign Secretary Gove would,of course ,welcome the Turks with open arms.

      • WTF

        There’s been plenty of dead bodies of all those nationalities over previous occasions when Germany wished to get its own way are we sure this can’t happen again.

      • sebastian2

        I thought Turkey’s accession along with huge sums of our dosh and the tempting morsel of visa-free travel (no consultation about this, naturally, by our lofty political/bureaucratic elite) were inducements in the “Back to Turkey” mass migration ploy – a desperate ruse which appears to have crashed (though I doubt we’ll get our money back.) since the migrants are still with us.

        The “non-starter” has been succeeded by a “non-departer”. All at our enormous expense. If this is how the EU manages its affairs (and it is), we’d be mad to continue with it.

      • mikewaller

        It also cannot help their case that they seem to commemorating the terrible Armenian massacres by doing likewise to the Kurds one hundred years later. Thank God for the Scottish referendum which at least served to show the World how such matters should be handled!

  • mikewaller

    For once, I am deeply in JD’s debt. Not, of course, for yet another basinful of ill-consider bilge but because he gives me the opportunity to comment on Brexit: the Movie, something which the mindless Google security system has so far denied me. What I have to say also plays in to JD’s faux puzzlement concerning the strength of the Remain camps reaction to the various Brexit contributions. The central issue is that the time-expired contributors lined up in support of Brexit – Heffer, Davis, Lawson, Farage etc. – although having no understanding of the key factors (economic and military) that will shape the next half century, seem to be having some success in influencing others cursed with the same degree of ignorance whilst lacking the wholly unjustified confidence the leading Brexiters exude. It is for this reason that the gloves have to come off in order to save the Nation.

    The key economic factor they miss is that we have now entered an era in which, globally, the numbers of workers engaged in industrial activity, or with the requisite skills and desire to be so engaged, is moving way ahead of the World capacity to pay for their aggregated output. This is because the industrial skills that formally gave the ordinary citizens of first world countries access to income levels way above the global average, have now been spread so widely that those income levels for ordinary people are becoming unsustainable. Industrial espionage, irresponsible manufacturers “exporting” jobs to low wage economies and academic institutions seeking to save their own bacon by engaging in technology transfer on a massive scale have all played their malign part; but the indisputable fact is that a globalised world no longer has a place in export industries, or those competing with overseas imports, for first world economic also-rans who 50 years ago would have had no problem in finding a semi-skilled or labouring job on reasonable pay.

    Having had several decades of buying the cheap imported goods that arise from this seismic shift in the balance of world trade, ordinary people are at last starting to wake up to the longer term consequences with regard the local labour market. Of course, the Brexit crooks/purblind fools are working very hard to persuade these people that their misfortunes are being caused solely by EU incomers. This is crap. What the EU immigrants are doing for the most part is giving our economy a fighting change by supplanting the least effective of the indigenous population. As a result, productivity – the lowness of which has shamed this country for over a century – is getting a useful boost. The real difficulty is that even with these incomers, our wage levels, welfare provision, etc.etc. mean that we cannot compete with countries having far lower cost bases. What should be obvious to all but the most doctrinaire(e.g. JD and the clowns listed above) is that for all the economic theory, globalisation is a disaster if you happen to be an average guy within a high wage economy. Ordinary voter are at last waking up to this, but more quickly in the USA than here. That is why the US government has just put a 522% tariff on Chinese steel imports and Trump is promising to put a very substantial tariff on Ford cars made in, and imported from, Mexico. These are just the first ripples of what will become a tidal wave of protectionism as politicians come to recognise that free-trade is becoming ballot box poison.

    It is against this background that the Brexit/Remain debate should be evaluated. Protectionism means trade blocs and under such circumstances to be caught out on your own will be economic suicide. The USA has no problem and could even abandon NAFTA if the democratic pressures made this unavoidable. The EU also has the numbers to face down countries such as China; BUT THE UK MOST CERTAINLY DOES NOT. Put another way, go it alone and we will be royally screwed. So the smartest thing would be to pass the hat round to generate enough funds to enable JD and his pals to retire into harmless obscurity and then we should all vote REMAIN!

    • Central power

      I would make watching Brexit: The Movie compulsory.Perhaps the makers could add some jingles sang by Boris in Brexit 2: The Movie.

    • Ludwig Apsel Weber

      Yes, businesses go to low wage areas and workers go to high wage areas. Took you long enough to make this basic point. The EU will protect us from cheaper goods, yes. Why we require such protection is, as ever, a mystery.

      • mikewaller

        I assumed from your second sentence that you were super smart — then I read the third one. Surely one would have to be either a grade A idiot or an out and out racist not to comprehend that, as they too now have the technology, low paid workers will always trump higher paid ones in the market place. Crooked Brexiters try to persuade us that EU immigrants are the problem. For the most part they are not as they tend to be young, well motivated, and not so culturally dissimilar from us as others. The real problem is globalisation and the massive level of imported goods reaching this country. One result is that our biggest export by dimension is now said to be the fresh air held within the huge number of containers currently being returned to sender, empty.

  • James, could you write about how Africa is being kept in the dark ages by racist EU subsidies. If the EU stopped being racist against African farmers by its heavy subsidies to uneconomic French farmers, the housing crisis could be sorted pronto: build over France’s farmlands for millions of immigrants, while allowing African farmers to thrive (this makes economic sense: no wasted subsidies are needed). Instead, the EU heavily subsidises French farmers to twiddle their thumbs while refugees pile up at Calais. See Braintree’s MP James Cleverly’s speech, where he explains that the European Union’s protection racket harms poor farmers in Africa, by giving unfair subsidies to rich European Union farmers and by trade tariffs against Africa. Britain also suffers from the inequality, paying £4.6 billion into the European Union’s common agricultural policy, but only getting £2.9 billion back. Thus, Britain would not only benefit Africa by seeing an end of European Union farming subsidies abuse, but it could also benefit its own farmers. – http://www.essexchronicle.co.uk/Braintree-MP-calls-globalists-leave-EU-Brexit/story-29198210-detail/story.html

    Africa imports 80% of its food, despite having 600 million hectares of uncultivated farmland. Trade tariffs and enormous subsidies to EU farmers keep Africa in poverty, Braintree MP James Cleverley (whose mother if African, from Sierra Leone) explains:

    “One of the saddest and most disturbing drivers of Africa’s continued poverty is global food policy, particularly the EU’s food policies. It loudly promotes free market principles but on a global stage, it spectacularly fails to deliver. Far from levelling the playing field, the EU reinforces the structural inequalities that favour big businesses and powerful countries at the expense of developing nations. … Every week we send £350 million to the EU. Of course, we get a bit of that back through farm subsidies, just enough to keep our farming industry addicted to EU membership. Our farmers are being taxed to subsidise their competitors to keep African farmers in poverty.”

    • Central power

      O dear. I thought the £ 350 million have already been allocated to the NHS by Boris The Bus Driver.You want to send them to the African farmers? The ones with bank accounts in Zurich?

    • WTF

      Zimbabwe when it was S. Rhodesia was a net exporter of food to the rest of Africa but since Mugabe took over its become a net importer, the EU has just compounded that problem.

    • Sean L

      The primary factor mitigating against economic development in Africa is the culture ingrained by aeons of subsistence farming. Even the lack of infrastructure – you want to see the traffic in Nairobi or Kampala, central London is a freeway in comparison – and endemic corruption are relatively insignificant. But they are also symptomatic of the lack of co-operation. But you can’t expect Africa to be the same as Europe in the space of a few decades. We seem to think European ways are the default for people generally. But you can already see the seeds of political stability developing in some places and evidence of entrepreneurial flair, but it will take time for the institutional arrangements that are necessary for a modern economy to evolve. I was in Uganda earlier this year speaking with a Ugandan friend who has a food business. He was telling me how Ugandans were importing food from Kenya that they could grow themselves. There just isn’t the organisation: people are accustomedd to growing what they need for themselves and then trading the surplus. The kind of large scale businesses that we take for granted aren’t just going to magically arise, whatever any government or NGO does. But as I say you can notice the germination of such development already to some extent, but it’s bound to be a slow process as the primary driver is cultural rather than operational or functional. But we tend to overlook that, projecting our own social and cultural mores on to others. In this case others who have a very different history and environment in every sense.

      • Ludwig Apsel Weber

        In 1960 South Korea’s GDP per capita was $79, lower than that of some sub-Saharan countries. Now it’s $36,511.

        • Sean L

          That has no bearing whatever on the point i was making…

    • Sean L

      I’d just add one thing to that, it’s actually the abundance in the fertile regions of Africa that mitigate against development. In less fertile Europe we *had* to cooperate for survival. Whereas in Uganda everyone could just grow their own. The historical legacy is the institutional arrangements necessary for a modern economy in our case, and their absence in theirs. But the pace of urbanisation has been accelerated in Africa by the rapid rise of technology, and that in turn has brought about a population explosion that has far outpaced their economic capacity. When everyone stayed in the village things looked after themselves as it were… subsistence farming by definition precludes economic development. One thing Karl Marx was right about, his great insight really, is that how we find our food, our basic material needs, determines to a great degree our social and political life.

  • Stop called them Remainers and start calling them Federasts. It has a nice ring to it, and it winds ’em up something chronic.

    • kyle lynch

      We just look at the Brexits and call them ill informed idiots.

      • Penny

        Why? What are the areas of their ignorance, Kyle? Just saying “ill-informed idiots” is rather lazy.

        • kyle lynch

          Much like op I was being childish and showing him how easy it is to resort to name calling rather than engage a debate.

  • alfredo

    I think you’ll find that the fear of a sharp drop in unearned income tends to put people somewhat on edge.

  • Andrew Cole

    Because they are winkers and we’re all doomed. Pass the gun around, we’re not wanted anymore.

  • Sean L

    I couldn’t watch that Brexit movie for more than a few minutes. It was embarrassing. Programmes on historical events nowadays require actors to portray the event in question: it’s not enough to say Churchill agreed to such and such, someone has to impersonate him in an acted out reconstruction. Similarly in this show it wasn’t enough to say the EU was a faceless bureaucratic behemoth or whatever, unaccountable to the people and so on, they had to present random people on the street with images of EU leaders asking if they recognised them. Apart from anything else you could do just the same here with our own politicians and get the same result: they often do. So what? They could not have aimed lower. But their presupposed audience of people with the attention span of a gnat will be watching EastEnders anyway. We used to have men like Enoch Powell and Michael Foot who could make an argument, and journalists like Robin Day who would monitor them. We might not have politicians of that calibre but they could still have made a show that didn’t just consist of cleverly edited soundbites of talking heads repeating the same thing ad nauseam spliced with slick images. If James Dellinpole says something why does the same thing have to be repeated by the editor of the Sun and various other luminaries? As I say, the people likely to be impressed by this tripe won’t be watching anyway.

    • jamesdelingpole

      I guess it’s just not given to many to be as wise and sophisticated as you, Sean.

      • Sean L

        Easy tiger, you made the same criticism yourself here of TV documentaries in your role as TV critic. What’s the difference apart from the fact that you’re in it, and it’s in a good cause? I hated it for the same reasons as you put against those stupid documentaries. More so perhaps, as I support the cause. If you want to give a reason why your previous criticism of those other programmes shouldn’t apply here, fair enough. Otherwise that’s a bit of a low blow mate. As I recall, the same guy made an excellent programme on global warming. But this was utter tripe that I wouldn’t show to school children. Was there anyone speaking continuously for more than a minute or two throughout the entire programme? I didn’t wait long enough to find out, it was so devoid of content.

        • grimm

          You didn’t wait long enough to find out.

          Does this mean that your argument is blustering (and frankly rather pompous) rage against the first few minutes of the documentary? Are we supposed to be impressed by this display of righteous anger against what you consider to be shoddy documentary making? Were your comments here just an ostentatious display of what a man of fine taste and intellect you are?

          • Sean L

            But you’re just echoing Dellingpole, making it about me rather than what I say about the programme. I watched it for 10-15 minutes. If it changed into something different after that and people were given the opportunity to speak for more than a few seconds, feel free to point that out. Otherwise I’m sure you’re a splendid chap yourself without a trace of self-aggrandisement in your character All the best to you grimm.

          • Ludwig Apsel Weber

            You watched 10-15mins. Do you have the attention span of a gnat? No wait, that’s everyone else…. for whom this documentary ought to be perfect, then! No? I’m confused.

          • Sean L

            Don’t be – you’re just wilfully misconstruing what I said, however ineptly I put it. Try the new Radiohead instead – it’s their best ever… and that’s saying something…

    • pjl20

      You should have seen the hour-long BBC1 TV documentary entilted ‘Paxman in Brussels:Who Really Rules Us?’ broadcast at 8pm on Thursday, 19 May.

      No-one could accuse Jeremy of being biased. He gave have each of the contributors the opportunity to explain their viewpoint. MEPs from each party took part.

      This spelt out the weaknesses and benefits of Britain being in and remaining within the EU. Alas, we have never been adequately consulted about our membership since, March 1975. We were deceived back then about where the EEC was headed: A European Super-state.

      Only the politicians have themselves to blame for Brexit, if this is chosen on June 23rd. They ought to have consulted us on at least 3 previous occasions by way of a Referendum about Treaties and about the ERM.

  • Yorkieeye

    They value cash over anything. I’ve not heard an argument from them that didn’t involve filthy lucre. They are crass and greedy.

  • Sean L

    This film was akin to those TV commercials which work *too well*. People were amused by Joan Collins and Leonard Rossiter but it was at the expense of the brand they were promoting. That’s what was argued anyway. Here one conceit was to have a taxi driver roam Brussels in search of the EU, which was everywhere and nowhere among the glass towers. But why is that a more effective way of impressing upon the viewer the colossal waste and aggrandisement at the heart of the EU project than merely presenting some suitably shocking facts and figures, say? Quite apart from the fact that you could similarly tour London SW1 looking for the British government. One thing you had to admire about Enoch Powell was that he never condescended to his audience. I doubt if even .01% of the population properly understood the literary and historical allusions in his most famous speech – I don’t know any Roman poetry and I did Latin at school. He knew that. But he also knew that people would get the gist of his argument, all the more so for *not* entirely grasping every nuance. Why? Because they recognised him as a genuine man of learning who nevertheless addressed them as equals. He was also being true to himself in his mode of expression, and that authenticity also registered with his audience. Thus the force of his argument was all the greater for being in part incomprehensible: what came through was his conviction, while his superior language carried its own authority. The only remotely comparable figure today is Boris, who however phony he might be in his allegiances is at least authentic in his person. Neither does he condescend to people. I watched the same director’s global warming programme convinced that it would leave its mark with viewers. Of course engaging people politically is not the same as making a merely theoretical argument. You must also appeal to latent allegiances and self interest. With global warming, the film was in the service of the argument. With ‘Brexit’ the order was reversed: it was all about the production values. But politically it was a damp squib. And so contrived that I positively hated it.

    • davidofkent

      For some strange reason Boris Johnson seems to be considered a modern Pericles. This is completely inappropriate. I like Boris but he is no Pericles. Boris’s style is more like Alcibiades than Pericles who spoke in measured tones, always seriously, and could explain his ideas clearly. In any case, Pericles’ Strategy for the Peloponessian War was clearly wrong. Enoch Powell was right but used language that was too easily subverted by the usual subjects.

      • Sean L

        i don’t know where you get the idea that I’m comparing Boris with Pericles or the like – I merely said he’s the only poltician currently in the public eye *remotely* comparable to Enoch Powell. Powell being an example of an intelligent politician who, unlike the makers of this in my view worthless film, *politically* worthless that is, didn’t condescend to his audience, with an authentic quality about him.

  • I wonder who these mythical “global elite” are?

    • Ludwig Apsel Weber

      Mythical? Are the UK and US governments figments of our imagination? The EU? The IMF? Goldman Sachs?

      • Oh – you mean the people that have made this the wealthiest generation ever for all sections of society.

        • fartytowels

          And the most indebted

          • At 80% of GDP it is certainly less than in the 1950s.

            We are currently about the same as the US and much better then (say) Japan which is at 225% GDP.

          • fartytowels

            Post-war the debt ratio began to drop rapidly and to lowest levels before we joined the common market. We’re at the highest level of debt:gdp since joining the eurozone. Since 2008 (an EU megablunder assisted by Goldman hiding Greece’s debt) it has skyrocketed.

          • Ooops – In the 1970s we required an IMF bailout. Now we own part of the IMF. How things have changed since we joined.

          • fartytowels

            You mean members like the other 188?.Yep. More bailouts all round. Broke nations (like Japan) are bailing out other broke nations with borrowed money. The UK recovery at that time was due largely to our oil revenues.

            So back to the EU – 4 out of the top 10 most indebted (to GDP) countries in the world are in the EU. Surely that speaks volumes.

          • WTF

            And the quality of life is no better when compared with countries with a fraction of our GDP.

          • So you haven’t been to a third-world country then?

          • WTF

            Of course I have, lets see now – Kowloon Side (HK) Kenya and not forgetting Venezuela.

          • WTF

            I should add of course, all three ‘countries’ have specific and unique problems unrelated to wealth vs happiness.

          • WTF

            And no happier for it !

          • Just because you’re a misery-guts don’t bring everyone else down.

          • WTF

            You confuse needs with wants or wishes of people and are just consumed with perceived wealth. Many studies have clearly shown that once a person has their needs met like food, shelter and clothing they reach the scale of 9 out of 10 for happiness. Earning twice as much might add another 0.5 but the graph is inversely exponential as the happiness increment reduces vs extra wealth levels.

            In fact for many rich or super rich people the happiness ‘index’ can even reverse with an increase in wealth. You see this predominantly among the liberal left celebs who whilst rich are chasing happiness with crazy notions of importing massive numbers of eco migrants. Russel Brand would be a good example on the migrant front whilst there’s Michael Jackson & Prince who over dosed whilst trying to find a meaning for their lives.

            As for my self, I’m probably at the 9.75-9.85 index of happiness as all my basic needs are met, I can afford modest luxury items and I have reasonable financial security. I am far from a misery-guts you may think I am and unlike you I’m not chasing that ever elusive happiness level based on wealth and nothing else.

          • Leon Wolfeson

            Quite, you’re fine so… you feel free to stop others being so.

          • WTF

            I do where I can but some like you are beyond redemption !

          • Leon Wolfeson

            Yes, yes, I’m Jewish hence to your Fash ideology… really, so predictable.

        • WTF

          And less happy than countries with a fraction of our so called wealth and GDP.

          Its a well established social fact that once the threshold of earnings has reached the level required to feed, clothe and house oneself, any further income (wealth) does NOT increase happiness or well being. This was shown decades ago in social studies and still holds true today !

          • “And less happy than countries with a fraction of our so called wealth and GDP.” You know what to do then – move.

          • WTF

            Geographic location in these studies are of course generalized as each person is different. Happiness and well being is an individual thing but being consumed with wealth generation believing it will bring happiness is a fools theory. I’ve been happy and can be happy in several countries as I have enough income for the basic needs in life.

          • Leon Wolfeson

            …And stuff the 99%. right.

          • WTF

            Its a well established social fact that once the threshold of earnings
            has reached the level required to feed, clothe and house oneself, happiness is at a 9.5% level for 95% of the country. There are however those like yourself and one or two others here who will never be happy with their ‘lot’ in life due to self persecution. Nothing will improve their happiness not even winning the lottery.

          • Leon Wolfeson

            And yet your right have ensured that things have got worse. As you then blame me for your issues.

            And you, 1%er, are determined to make people miserable for the 99%, so…

          • WTF

            Even in the UK well being among people is not too shabby as shown by these surveys and that certainly gels with myself. However, there’s always exceptions to the norm for those self persecuting and wallowing in self pity like yourself.

            http://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/wellbeing/bulletins/measuringnationalwellbeing/2015-09-23

            http://www.theguardian.com/society/2016/feb/02/middle-aged-people-least-happy-most-anxious-ons-wellbeing-report

          • Leon Wolfeson

            So you think things are fine here….. as you name the 99% like myself, I see.

          • WTF

            Incoherence Alert !

          • Leon Wolfeson

            I agree you’re incoherent.

  • Voting OUT to spite the “global elite” (whoever they are) and hurting your own wealth in the process is know by the technical term of “cutting off your nose to spite your face”.

    • Ludwig Apsel Weber

      Well that’s just it. The Leave crowd think the EU is a cost, not a benefit. Are you just presuming that EU membership somehow makes us wealthy?!

      • The estimate from the business community was a 6% reduction in GDP (and they should know). So less jobs, less tax, etc.

        And don’t forget that pre-EU we need to get a bailout from the IMF and now we own part of the IMF.

        And just compare what the UK was like before we joined to now:
        We can now afford almost four times as many cars per million people on the road. People have twice as long vacations and will probably go further. We eat out four times as often. People spend longer in retirement. Obesity is now a problem that our parents certainly couldn’t afford. The number of households has grown as we can afford to have less people per house. Benefits have far outstripped inflation.

        • fartytowels

          Correlation is not causation. What if we hadn’t joined – things may have been far better. Cherry picking is for politicians not statisticians.

          • “What if we hadn’t joined – things may have been far better.”

            Fantasy is not fact.

            Reading tea leaves is for mediums and not UKIPpers.

          • fartytowels

            Meaning that correlation is not causation. And your “facts” are not demonstrable to any EU relationship any more than mine.

          • Meaning that stating something that happened in a parallel universe that you haven’t visited as if it is a fact is dishonest.

          • fartytowels

            I didn’t state anything. it was a rhetorical question posed to illustrate your logical fallacy.

          • Mary Ann

            Things may also have been a lot worse.

    • Mary Ann

      Cutting off everybody’s nose……..

  • SonOfaGun

    Since 1945, Europe has swung to the left with abandon. Gravity has kicked in.

    • mikewaller

      Absolute rubbish! The last three decades have seen the triumph of market capitalism a system which is strongly supported by mass media organisations such as the Murdoch press. What is happening now is that the ordinary Joe has finally realised the cost to him or her of globalisation. Sadly, the same media are claiming that EU immigrants are the cause of the trouble. in reality, it is the massive transfer of technology – spearheaded by greedy entrepreneurs – that has fundamentally shifted the terms of trade. The only hope we have of avoiding a massive crash in living standards is to remain within the EU. Brexit, and we’ll be buggered by everybody!

      • Chris Scott

        That’s an odd thing to say, Mike. Thought being “buggered by everybody” was the in-thing these days. Only joking! Not sure which media you’re talking about. Most of those I observe promote the assumption that unlimited immigration is essential and unreservedly beneficial, and anyone who suggests otherwise is fundamentally lacking in human decency.

        • mikewaller

          You amaze me. Have you read The Sun, The Mail, or The Express? I certainly don’t think that EU immigration is an unalloyed good and I am pretty sure that we will be a great deal less accommodating if and when more Eastern European countries join. [Turkey, I believe, is a total non-starter not least because of their repeated anti-Kurd pogroms.] That said, the addition of a substantial number of young, enthusiastic, largely Christian fellow Europeans into our economy has undeniably been a valuable counter to an aging population, within a country that has serious skill shortages and a sizeable proportion of established incomers with a very different cultural background.
          However, in the final analysis, my position is based on the reason Belloc gave in advising young people to hold on to Nanny’s hand: “for fear of something worse”. [i.e. I think the so-called “project fear” is wholly justified]. The USA has recently put a massive tariff on Chinese steel to protect American jobs and Trump got a very positive response to his proposed tariff on Ford cars made in Mexico. I think these are early indicators of a wholesale return to protectionism as democratic pressures in Western countries drive politicians down that road to satisfy voters understandably reluctant to have their wage levels drive down to the relatively miniscule world average by globalisation. Under such circumstances, to set up as an independent sole trader outside the great trade bloc of which we are currently a member would be tantamount to economic suicide.

          • Chris Scott

            Thanks Mike, I’ll grant you those three – but what about the vast majority of the other paper, electronic and broadcast media?
            Turkey has the EU over a barrel on migration. The odious Mr Erdogan, as readers of this magazine know better than most, is able to force EU countries to censor and even prosecute his critics.
            Think you mean “Nurse”? She, with the exception of Germany, is too poorly effectively to guide us and the others. In fact, the old girl may even be terminally ill. Public dssent is growing due to uncontrolled immigration and unemployment. Despite – or maybe because of – the referendum, the pound has for some time been gently strengthening against the euro and even the dollar. (Inconclusive, I’ll grant you, like the opinion polls.)
            Am not conviced by your argument on protectionism and the alleged desirability of remaining under the constraints of the single market.

  • Margot5000

    With this referendum hasn’t the phrase “It’s the economy, stupid” become “It’s NOT the economy , stupid”. Surprisingly, for many people OUT does seem to be more important than a new sofa or hot tub.

  • Teacher

    We have seen this bullying, sneering, contemptuous attitude before, in particular, during the last election where those on the left characterised the right as ‘fascists’, ‘racists’, ‘bigots’, ‘Kippers’ (uttered in tones of scorn and hatred) and ‘Tories’ (ditto).

    Their fury and invective on losing the election were horrible to behold. It has become ubiquitous that rightists are happy, contented, polite and tolerant but silent for fear of spiteful attacks and that the left, the green fringe and, now, Remainers too, are full of hateful, vociferous vituperation, never silenced by manners or consideration for the feeling of others.

    I know many of these people personally. They are the ‘nice’ middle classes who colonise the public services, charities, book clubs and other soi disant caring organisations and they are truly offensive. Why? They actually think there is only one side which is right and that, therefore, those who debate or offer contrary views are wrong and evil.

  • Mark Edwards

    Switzerland isn’t in the EU, so if we leave, that means we will become just like them. The Sea of Tranquillity is outside the EU too, and they’re not doing too well for themselves. What a complete non-argument that is.

    ‘Red tape’ is another word for the rules and regulations that protect people. The fact you use loaded terms such as ‘red tape’ proves you have an agenda which includes misleading people.

    That ‘red tape’ includes things like food being safe for human consumption, or protecting the environment, or mobile phone adapters being safe and unlikely to explode, setting fire to your home.

    And it takes an international body like the EU to implement those because yes, they are costly, but they are also incredibly important. The British government wants to give the rules concerning animal welfare over to the food industry – do you think they’ll protect animal rights, or go the cheaper route and slash them? National governments will always put businesses first, and people second. International governments will do the opposite. Should we leave the UN because of all their pesky red tape protecting our basic human rights and dignity?

    • Andy Johnson

      Switzerland has plenty of the necessary type of regulation. You can’t drop a sweetie paper there. What it doesn’t have is the type of regulation referred to in the film (have you seen the film?) which is designed by a corrupt EU bureaucracy to keep efficient small and medium sized competitors out of the market dominated by those megacorps who give the bureaucrats their constant champagne receptions.

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