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Books

Taking the Kamasutra seriously

Far from being a mere sex manual, its devious strategies for seduction are rooted in politics and spirituality, according to Wendy Doniger

21 May 2016

9:00 AM

21 May 2016

9:00 AM

Redeeming the Kamasutra Wendy Doniger

OUP, pp.184, £14.99, ISBN: 9780190499280

The rough English translation of Kamasutra is pleasure (kama) treatise (sutra). In the West, since it was first (rather surreptitiously) translated and published back in 1883, the book has generally been associated with a series of beautiful, ancient illustrations of a couple determinedly coupling in a variety of fascinating — and often utterly improbable — positions; as essentially ‘the erotic counterpart to the ascetic asanas of yoga’.

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