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Arts feature

Norman Sicily was a multicultural paradise – but it didn’t last long

The British Museum’s new exhibition, Sicily: culture and conquest, celebrates the glories of this multi-ethnic, quadrilingual powerhouse

9 April 2016

9:00 AM

9 April 2016

9:00 AM

A few weeks ago, I looked out on the Cathedral of Monreale from the platform on which once stood the throne of William II, King of Sicily. From there nearly two acres of richly coloured mosaics were visible, glittering with gold. In the apse behind was the majestic figure of Christ Pantocrator — that is, almighty.

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Sicily: Culture and Conquest is at the British Museum from 21 April to 14 August.

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