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Radio

How the BBC made the most unlikely TV hit of the swinging Sixties

Plus: a drama about Shakespeare’s dying days on Radio 3, and Trevor Phillips explains why he changed his mind about multiculturalism

30 April 2016

9:00 AM

30 April 2016

9:00 AM

‘Comedy is like music,’ said Edwin Apps, one of the characters in Wednesday afternoon’s Radio 4 play, All Mouth and Trousers (directed by David Blount). ‘The words are the notes and they have to be in exactly the right place. And every line has to pull its weight, add something to the situation.’

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