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Arts feature

Egypt: where gods are born and go to die

Neil MacGregor’s last major exhibition at the British Museum is a fascinating portrait of a crucial period in Egyptian history that holds a mirror up to today

29 October 2015

9:00 AM

29 October 2015

9:00 AM

Over the stupefyingly long course of Egyptian history, gods have been born and they have died. Some 4,000 years ago, amid the chaos that marked the fragmentation of the original pharaonic state, an incantation was inscribed on the side of a coffin. It imagined a time when there had been nothing in existence save a single divine Creator.

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Egypt: faith after the pharaohs is at the British Museum until 7 February 2016.

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