Politics

Will anyone fight, fight and fight again to save what’s left of New Labour?

Blairites are coming to terms with the consequences of their ‘lack of moral authority’ – and emotional intelligence

26 September 2015

8:00 AM

26 September 2015

8:00 AM

Five years ago this Saturday, Ed Miliband was crowned Labour leader. Three days later, he had to deliver his first conference speech in that role. It was a distinctly underwhelming address. Miliband was overshadowed by his brother, who ticked Harriet Harman off for clapping. To try to give its new leader a better start this time round, Labour decided to announce the result of its leadership contest a fortnight before the party conference.

But two weeks has been nowhere near enough time for Labour to come to terms with what has happened. The Parliamentary Labour Party is still in a state of shock about Jeremy Corbyn’s leadership. One senior Labour MP fumes, ‘It’s beyond a joke, but it is now my life,’ while even Corbyn’s early backers still can’t quite believe that he has actually won and that they are now in charge.

For these reasons you won’t be able to judge Labour’s conference by the normal rules. If there is some sophisticated conference grid designed to get the party’s new message across, the shadow cabinet are not aware of it. The media’s old party conference game of ‘find the split’ will be pointless this year. Labour frontbenchers won’t bother to hide their disagreement with their leader on a whole slew of issues. One figure close to many on the front bench says, ‘We’re not living in a world where there’s collective responsibility across the piste.’ Rather, they say that shadow cabinet members have agreed to serve as long as they accept the new leader’s policy agenda in their own particular brief.

Corbyn’s conference address will not, if his leadership to date is any guide, abide by the normal rules either. His turn at the Trade Union Congress showed that he has no intention of abandoning his habit of writing his speeches as he delivers them. The result there was an address that was authentically Corbyn but that did not deliver some of the lines which had been briefed to the media. Indeed, the Tories have been pleasantly surprised at how poor a public speaker the new Labour leader is. Many of them assumed that he would be in the Tony Benn class. But Corbyn is no rhetorician.


One test of Corbyn’s success as leader is whether conference becomes more powerful. When the Corbynites talk of making Labour more ‘democratic’, what they mean is curbing the influence of MPs by giving more power to conference. Their aim is to see it become the supreme policymaking body of the party. But to do that, they would have to outmanoeuvre the old right, which still holds many of the levers of power.

It would be easy for Labour’s moderates and reformers to expend their energies trying to work out how to stop the Corbynites fundamentally changing the party. But this would not be the best use of their time. Rather, they need to confront the more fundamental challenge of working out why Corbyn, a distinctly mediocre candidate, defeated them with such ease.

For the Blairite wing of the party this exercise is particularly painful. Despite them having led the party to three election victories, their candidate — Liz Kendall — received only 4.5 per cent of the vote in the leadership contest. Even worse for them is that this was the second Labour leadership contest in a row which has been won by the candidate rejecting New Labour and its approach.

The temptation is to declare that Labour, like the Tories after Thatcher, are simply unable to come to terms with the legacy of their three-time election winner. But the truth is that with both Thatcher and Blair, the stumbling block wasn’t their record in office but how they have behaved out of it. The Tory problem with Thatcher was that after she was forced out of Downing Street she set about persuading her party that she had been a purely ideological, conviction politician — when she had in fact been a pragmatist when necessary. This led too many of her Tory supporters down an ideological cul-de-sac in an attempt to recapture her election-winning magic. The Blair problem is not with what he has said since he left office, but what he has done. His business dealings have given ample ammunition to those who think that New Labour was a betrayal of the party’s values. They have made it far easier for Blairism’s internal critics to suggest that the whole project was just about sucking up to the rich and powerful. ‘The loss of moral authority is the real killer,’ says one of those who is trying to keep the Blairitie flame alive.

Loss of moral authority has been compounded by lack of emotional intelligence. Too often, the Blairites have responded to any internal criticism by simply pointing to their election-winning record as if that should end all debate. They have reacted to their party’s electoral setbacks not with empathy but with a crude ‘I told you so’. As one leading backer of Liz Kendall admits, ‘We weren’t emotionally literate in our response’ to Labour’s general election defeat. The challenge for them is to find a way of reconnecting with the party that they want to lead. They need to re-establish that first Blairite coalition that included both the soft left and the modernising right.

Many have concluded, though, that the Blairite brand is now too toxic to rescue. Instead, they want to portray themselves as part of a longer Labour modernising tradition. Rather than to Blair, they look to Hugh Gaitskell. But the question is how many of them will obey his admonition to ‘fight and fight and fight again to save the party we love’. Reversing the hard left’s takeover will not be easy. It will require a new champion, a fresh set of arguments and the recruitment of 100,000 new, more moderate members. If they aren’t prepared — or able — to do that, Corbyn’s election will be the end of the Labour party as an election-winning force.

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Show comments
  • Gilbert White

    They mean Tony Benn, fool.

  • Gordon

    Doesn’t look like it at the moment. They’re all too afraid of the Corbynistas.

    • Jaria1

      And rightly so , corbynistas fight dirty and he will look the other way whilst his left wing chums use any method to achieve their aims. Misinformation is their favourite tool.
      They rig elections shamefully threaten MPs who disagree with them with deselection and have already got twenty odd subsidised MPs that will do their bidding.
      It also appears that they have a clever PR team able to convince far too many gullible voters that their policies will be beneficial to the UK.

      • Mara Naile-Akim

        sorry… but why should MP’s who don’t represent their constituency Labour party’s views stay on as MP’s? Surely their job is to represent?

        • Jaria1

          That being the case Corbyn would have been given his marching orders long before he refused to follow the party line 500 occaisons I believe but Corbyn like others was chosen as the right man to represent his constituents by using his own judgement.
          You are suggesting that elected MPs should be no more than rubber stamps accepting dictats sent down by just a few senior members of his party. Thats not a form of democracy to be proud of

  • Gebhard Von Blucher

    The so-called Blairite wing of the Labour movement should create a new party and then studiously avoid merging it with the Liberal Democrats.

    • siphil

      Yes. They could call themselves the Social Democratic Party or SDP for short.

      • Ian Beale Steeplecoque

        Or the lost bastards .

    • Ian Beale Steeplecoque

      The Blairites Wong can now give up politics. Things have moved on. Nobody wants them.

  • MikeF

    New Labour was a mirage – a smart-suited, smiley badge veneer over what was in reality a melange of not just opportunism and careerism but also a vindictive, self-righteous bureaucratic authoritarianism. It debased this country and made it a more intolerant and unpleasant place to live. It is not worth ‘saving’ because there is nothing worth ‘saving’.

    • stuartMilan

      spot on, a perfect summary of a disreputable part of our recent history

      • opnyrhrts

        lessons

    • Jaria1

      Mirage or not they had a charismatic leader who knew how to get peoples vote.
      At the moment Labour presents nobody that represents the vast number of true Labour supporters.
      Until you do it really doesnt matter what your opinions are.

      • MikeF

        They had a sociopathic spiv who knew how to get people’s votes. Nor did ‘New Labour’ in any way ‘represent’ the bulk of its voters. It actually detested them and legislated against them. It was a clever trick to pull I’ll grant you that.

        • Jaria1

          Not my point Mike F. Labour need to find a way to find a leader who will attract votes and who could be seen as a reasonable alternative leader. I see Corbyn as a threat to how I would like Britain to be .
          Blair was not a person I admired but the Left are not going to influence my judgement because of their fury at him not cancelling the industrial relation acts and whilst we are at it . My only gripe about his actions leading to the invasion on Iraq was him lying to the HoC.

          • Clive

            He didn’t lie to the HoC

            I should add, I am no admirer of Blair but I did and do support the Iraq War

          • Jaria1

            We will have to disagree on that Clive. If you like to suggest he unknowingly misled them , its remotely possible but the information given by him to the HoC in my opinion was false.
            I too share your views about Saddams removal. The UN is in no position to be used as whether an action is legal or illegal. Firstly its riddled with corruption and the smaller countries votes are for sale to the highest bidder. The security council is a joke when a member such as France can veto a proposal to invade Iraq to foster its own business interests

          • SPPaul

            ‘I have never put our justification for action as regime change. We have to act within the terms set out in resolution 1441’. That is our legal base. Tony Blair to Parliament 18 March 2003.

            ‘Iraq probably has no weapons of mass destruction’ resignation speech of Robin Cook House of Commons 17 March 2003 (former Foreign Secretary).

          • MikeF

            The Labour Party needs to be ground into the dust. Maybe then a decent centre-left party might emerge, as indeed might a more overtly socialist party – for those who like that sort of thing – possibly even a Muslim confessional party. At least then we might have a politics based on a bit more honesty about what the parties involved represented.

          • Jaria1

            The Labour party over the past decade has been infected by a campaign of far left activists and it feeds us with misleading information much as what the left is known to do to appeal to those that dont give sufficient thought prior to voting.
            They have played on encouraging people to detest wealth as opposed to harnessing it to invest in the country and creating jobs.too many dont bother to work it out.
            Please explain what you mean by a Muslim confessional party. I see Muslims as a direct threat to this country and being relatively small in number their leaders whomthey obey without question tell them who to vote for. Given that 100% vote as ordered they make a heavy impression on our politics as the average Brit. Might achieve a 40% turn out it is pretty even distributed. We see a large number of Muslims gaining a disproportiate amont bein voted into offive already

          • MikeF

            By a ‘Muslim confessional party’ I mean exactly what I say – a nationwide version of what happened in Tower Hamlets. Parts of the Labour Party already operate that way at a grassroots organisational level and all that would be involved is a rebranding exercise. The malign nature of the current situation is that an Islamic ‘tail’ gains disproportionate influence by wagging a Labour ‘dog’. It would be nowhere near as influential on its own. That is why the destruction of the Labout Party is so necessary for the revitalisation of the political life of this country.

          • Mara Naile-Akim

            No, it hasn’t been ‘infected’. The people you think as ‘far left activists’ are indeed the holders of the true values of Labour, going back to Clem Attlee. It is New Labour that ‘infected’ the party.

          • Jaria1

            New Labour cannot be held responsible for Labours dreadful performance since Blair left .
            If you wish to look the other way whilst far left Union activists take over the Labour party who am I to dissuade you. Although I do believe in a strong opposition to hold a gvt in check.
            The Attlee model had its good points in its time but would be seen as far out of date now , even so he would be turning in his grave to see us copying totalitarian regimes, cosying up to terrorists , altering our allegiances to traditional allies and being congratulated by undemocratic leaders from places like Argentina and Russia.
            If thats the sort of Britain you want then you are very much in the minority

          • Mara Naile-Akim

            but we have those already. Respect for the Muslims, Lib Dems for the centre-left, Labour for left. Clem Attlee and Keir Hardie instilled certain values which need to be followed.

          • Jaria1

            Fortunately in this country there is nothing to prevent you believing what you want .Likewise im free to disagree with you which of course I do

        • Ian Beale Steeplecoque

          Mikeis correct. Blair was a sociopath.An egoist. NuLabor was a clever trick. Corbyn is a genuine hope for the real poor.

      • Mara Naile-Akim

        yeah, a leader who sold out on his principles for power

        thanks but no thanks

    • Clive

      How is that different from any other political party ?

      They all use the veneer, they all finish up regulating something some portion of the electorate does not want regulated

      • MikeF

        The Conservatives patronises the electorate, Labour either grovels to it or persecutes it depending on their ethnicity. The Conservatives are dismal, Labour are evil,.

        • Clive

          Or, to summarise, they maximise their vote

          That’s politics

        • Damon

          Not so. The Conservatives are not perfect, but they remain the party of pragmatism, business and enterprise, self-reliance, reasonable taxation, moderate Unionism and aspiration. If they don’t deliver enough of the things you like (for example, on deficit reduction and immigration curbs) this is often a result of the constraints of political reality. Better some of what you want, with the Tories, than none of what you want, with Labour. We are not the same.

          • MikeF

            Didn’t say they were and as far as I am concerned the ‘worst possible’ Conservative Government would still be better than the ‘best possible’ Labour equivalent. But when I see a Conservative commitment to abolishing Labour’s debasement of this ocuntry’s justice system through the concept of ‘racially aggravated’ crime I might begin to believe there some substantive differences.

          • stuartMilan

            they USED to be those things

          • Jaria1

            We dont know what they are yet . They have as yet to identify themselves now that they are no longer in a coalition.

          • stuartMilan

            how about: pro-EU shills, keen to make their careers at the expense of our democracy? and yes, that gives them much more in common with the LibDems (the glue that held the coalition together?) and Labour than any one of them would like to admit.

          • Chamber Pot

            Of course. Damon must be smoking skunk to think that the Conservatives stand for anything any more.

            The idea that we should resign ourselves and accept such scheming and abject mediocrity from the Tories out of fear of something worse is no longer compelling.

            On any objective measure of performance they have proved a catatrophic failure: over Europe, over mass immigration, on the threat levels from terrorism, Syria, Libya, Scotland, and the list goes on and on.

            Dave should resign.

          • Burlington1432

            Ummm have we had many terrorist attacks under Cameron?

          • Mara Naile-Akim

            New Labour embraced most of those, if not all. Blindly, without wondering what was behind those labels, or what the inherent contradictions between them were

            that is why they needed to go.

          • Jaria1

            The way they went could not have been organised as badly as it was.
            You had an election winner and replaced him with one that lost more seats for you party than they had lost in decades and amazingly replaced him with another loser. Now you would think by then someone would have twigged on that you needed someone who could win an election that would enable you to introduce your ideas into law.
            Just look at what you have done. Cameron must thank his guardian angel for the crass stupidity of the Labour party

          • goodsoldier

            Constraints of political reality–like what? Give some meaningful examples please.

  • RavenRandom

    They’ve already lost the next general election. They have a leader and shadow chancellor who supports terrorists and a Shadow Secretary of State for the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs who just said “I really believe that meat should be treated in exactly the same way as tobacco, with public campaigns to stop people eating it.”

    It’s this constant insult to the views of the bulk of the electorate that makes them think Labour has been taken over by the Sociology Department of a third rate university.

    The “normal” MPs in Labour should leave now and form True Labour or something similar before they’re purged.

    • Fraser Bailey

      It looks as though most of them will be de-selected by the Corbynistas, so they might as well form a new party or join the LibDems, or take up knitting, or whatever, while they can. Incidentally, de-slection is a fate much more gentle than that which would have awaited them when Lenin came to power. They should be grateful.

    • Kin62

      Any examination of “centrist” break-aways from left-wing parties shows that said break-aways usually end up as the right-wing party’s bitch a few years down the line. Liz Kendall et al should be aware that they might loathe Corbyn but the alternative is to end up like Shirley Williams- nice title, nice expense account in the Lords, nice lecture tour in America, a slot on Question Time, lots of interviews- and saying how lovely a man David Cameron is. See also Joseph Chamberlain, David Lloyd George, Ramsay Macdonald, Roy Jenkins, pretty much every other radical politician who got mixed up with the other side (I include Jenkins because the SDP inadvertently helped Thatcher win landslides).

    • goodsoldier

      Are Yvette Cooper and Harriet Harman normal?

  • Peter Stroud

    The £3 Labour membership started the rot. It encouraged a load of Trots, Marxists and extreme lefties to join/rejoin the Labour ranks. This inspired the indigenous extreme left in the unions, and among the rank and file of the party to rise up. When Corbyn was brought in to enliven the race, Christmas had come early. Now Labour has to live with their mistakes.

    • Clive

      Fairly comically, Corbyn got almost half of the ‘Old’ Labour party vote

      I believe that was due to opinion polls that said he was going to win

      The major parties are both more radical than their leaderships – the Tories to the Right, Labour to the Left

      In recent decades, these memberships have been realistic about appealing to the centre.

      The addition – through, I think, this Arnie Graf policy of open primaries – of a large transitory vote which had no view to consequences – has changed all that

      I believe a lot of the ‘old’ party members saw the poll and thought to hell with it, I’m in

      Of course, it helped that none of the other candidates had the charisma of a brick

      It also helped that Corbyn came up with policies funded by money printing

    • Damon

      “When Corbyn was brought in to enliven the race, Christmas had come early.”
      Well, Corbyn must like Christmas; after all, he’s crackers.

    • Mara Naile-Akim

      nothing stopped the supporters of the other 3 candidates joining and voting too

    • Ian Beale Steeplecoque

      No mistake. Just a recapturing of power and influence for real intellectuals. Years of having the lunatics run the asylum may now be history.

      • goodsoldier

        Real intellectuals? Who are you talking about?

  • Jingleballix

    New Labour……..the most Machiavellian government Britain has probably ever had.

    Lying, grasping, spinning, cheating, obfuscating, prating, grating, dissembling, class-hating, war-mongering, sinecure-creating………New Labour.

    If Tony Blair was so much of a ‘pretty straight kind of guy’……….howcome, he is the only past-PM in living memory bot to be knighted or ennobled??

    Because he was – and is – a totally dishonest, unprincipled ‘C U Next Tuesday.

    • Clive

      …and if he had been knighted of ennobled you would have accused him of being on that gravy train as well

      This piece is right. The money Blair has made lost New Labour the moral high ground.

      There is no reason whatever why it should have – it ought to be a compliment to say someone has a talent for making money. Blair was so loathed by the Left, however, that everything he touches turns to something hated.

      If he ran the ‘Save the Bee’ campaign, annual sting rate would come into the news.

      • Jingleballix

        There’s are two reasons why Blair hasn’t received any honours – 1) the people don’t think he deserves it, and 2) the Queen believes he is a disgrace.

        Why……..well, small reasons first…….he bragged about having sex in the Queen’s house, and because he tried to make political capital out of the deaths and funerals of Diana and the Queen Mother.

        By the major reason of course – he took the country (na d the Queen’s soldiers) to war on a totally false prospectus……..and then utterly failed to equip them properly.

        Had my son been killed in those pointless wars – Blair would not still be walking this earth.

        Disgusting man.

    • WhiteVanMan

      You’ve forgotten Thatcher

      • Jingleballix

        Other end of the scale………one of the truly great PMs……….but of course you know that – you’re just trolling.

        • WhiteVanMan

          The reply to was whether Balir was the onlyone ,who created wealth for the rich was war mongering or used spin,I didn’t say any of those things were bad, I just pointed out,that Balir wasn’t the only one who did that
          How can one troll by commenting on the Tories alongside Blair in a article about trying to save the Labour Party?

    • WhiteVanMan

      Gordon brown? And he didn’t want a peerage

  • RavenRandom

    I see Corbyn has just reiterated support for a united Ireland. What a guy, just loves Britain.

    • martivickers

      Ireland’s not part of Britain. Never has been. UK, yes, Britain no.

      • Jackthesmilingblack

        Give Ireland back to the Irish.
        Or alternatively, sell Ireland back to the Irish, already.

        • Labour Mole Catcher

          You are about as Irish (or British) as I am a Red Indian!

          • Jackthesmilingblack

            Or a half-cast Chinese? What about it Jock?
            I’ve never claimed to be Irish. That’s just another one of your illogical assumptions.
            Jack, the Japan Alps Brit
            Still keeping the looney around for laughs, Spectator?

          • Labour Mole Catcher

            The “British bloke” who uses all sorts of Americanisms and over 16!

        • Ian Beale Steeplecoque

          My idea exactly. Mass movement if 900,000 Orsngenen home to Glasgow and maybe 50,000 Fenians home to Side. Total cost £50 billion, peanuts.

        • dwarfpoo

          I will keep my British passport thanks.

      • Ian Beale Steeplecoque

        Correct.

    • Ian Beale Steeplecoque

      But Britain would be better off without any bits of Ireland. We should give all 900,000 Prots in Ulster £40,000 each to let them move home to Scotland and have done with it. Elizabethan colonial failures should not haunt us in 2015. Total cost £40 billion is less than bailing out RBS, and 2% of national debt.

  • thomasaikenhead

    “Will anyone fight, fight and fight again to save what’s left of New Labour?”

    No, because everyone now realises that the Blair/Brown legacy is so toxic that it is electoral poison!

    The consequences of the Blair Iraq War and the Brown financial disaster have so damaged the UK, not to mention the collapse of the Labour Party in Scotland after those two leaders who were Scots themselves mean that there is nothing of ‘New Labour’ left for anyone to fight over let alone for.

    Jeremy Corbyn was elected and enjoys so much support from the young and the motivated precisely because he is not New Labour, he represents hope a a credible future for the Labour Party because he has no baggage.

    • Clive

      He has different baggage, like Hamas, etc.

      • thomasaikenhead

        I think you will find that Tony Blair has a very real responsibility for the deaths, failed state and refugees in Iraq, the same for Cameron with regard to Libya, and these are rather different from Jeremy Corbyn making some comments!

        • Jaria1

          No Blair was very much the junior partner and had no say in the US peace cock up.
          You are resorting to party politics when blaming Cameron for Libya.
          The removal of Gaddafi abd Huessein cannot be seen as anything but good.
          Whos to say they wouldnt have WMD by now

        • Terry Field

          Silly boy.

        • WhiteVanMan

          Supporting the IRA, Hamas, broad water farm rioters lead to deaths

      • Terry Field

        I like Hamas, but I prefer taramasalata.

    • Jaria1

      Thirty years of baggage to be correct.
      As for credible future do you agree with his policies and do you think the worlds democratic countries will dobusiness with him.
      Certainly Russia. Argentine give himsupport but they are hardly democratic,

    • Terry Field

      Oh please! – a few hundred thousand hardened activists in a nation of – by most accounts – of at least 70 million.
      Only a bunch of history-ignoring simpletons think these dull fools have anything to offer.

      • Mara Naile-Akim

        well, those ‘simpletons’ include leading economists

    • Kin62

      Look, I even voted for Corbyn, but let me tell you this, “he enjoys so much support from the young” is only the case if “the young” means middle-class kids whose Tory parents bought them a flat while they study bull***t at uni, whose view of the racial minorities they purport to care about is racial bigotry disguised as concern, whose view of the working class they purport to care about is “they’re all bigots”, who go on protests about any cause going regardless of the merits thereof, and who piss off the rest of their Facebook friends by posting about politics all the time. I’m sorry but that’s not enough to win an election.

      • thomasaikenhead

        “I’m sorry but that’s not enough to win an election.”

        Well, ‘New Labour’ lost the last two general elections and saw Labour wiped out in Scotland despite Blair and Brown being being Scots, so it will be hard for Jeremy Corbyn to do any worse?

  • Tamerlane

    Five years is a very long time and runners with a poor start often end up coming in on pedigree form. Corbyn has plenty of time to get his act together and consolidate his power. If he can do that then In five years time no one will remember this, especially if he’s riding high on a wave of revolutionary resentment at an establishment that presides over more and more expensive housing and cost of living and scarcer jobs that cover those costs adequately. It’s a foolish Tory that writes him off.

    • Jaria1

      How many of his stated policies do you agree with.
      Granted if hes still therewhen the election comes around he wont frighten the voter away with views he has held fo thirty years but are you really prepared to take the risk that he will have dropped them

      • Tamerlane

        I don’t agree with any of his views, not a single one, it’s why I vote Tory or UKIP. I’m just saying – don’t underestimate him.

        • Jaria1

          I dont underestimate him or his team.
          If I can detect a fanatic it scares
          me that others cant or are prepared to overlook it.
          However bad the others may be they would be better than a left take over.
          We see them with their deselection threats already

          • Mara Naile-Akim

            agreed, that’s why free market and austerity fanatics scare the hell out of me. Happy to sacrifice anything to their utopian belief in the invisible hand.

          • Jaria1

            Lol . I speak of Corbyn . Do you really think this country would prosper under his economic policies.
            Whereas if you are preparedd to compare our position with 90% of Western democracies you would be foolish to bet against Osbornes policies which btw are in line with those of Alastair Darling .

        • Ian Beale Steeplecoque

          You admit to voting UKIP . Hitler’s apologist votes Farage. We should have guessed.

          • Tamerlane

            Often vote Farage and proud to do so. You vote Galloway and work for the Respect Party. You are a filthy vile homophobic misogynistic racist Islamic fundamentalist. We all read how you poured scorn on the brave Marines on the train in France whilst heaping praise on the fundamentalist with the rifle. We’ve read your posts calling British soldiers in WWI cowards whilst praising Bin Laden for his leadership. Despicable scum you are.

          • Ian Beale Steeplecoque

            No. I am not filthy, nor homophobic, nor mysoginist, nor racist, nor Islamist. I have never called British troops cowards, nor have I praised Bin Laden. Your efforts to malign me become increasingly humorous as they increase in desperation.
            I know you need to impress your paymasters and look like you have made a decent stab at it . But I fear most readers will find you a tedious , monotonous, one trick bore.
            Do us all a favour and take your disgusting UKIP sympathies to the Tory graph.

          • Tamerlane

            I think my UKIP sympathies are far more popular around here than your Galloway trolling somehow.

          • Ian Beale Steeplecoque

            Don’t be so ridiculous. Farage is a laughing stock. 3 million votes and just the Tory defector for an MP. UKIP are an utter disgrace. Bringing shame on our once proud nation. You should apologise for even thinking about supporting them.

          • Tamerlane

            As you would say ‘Inshallah’.

          • Ian Beale Steeplecoque

            What?

          • Ian Beale Steeplecoque

            Can I congratulate you on being the only Speccie poster whomcsn accusexanothervof racism without having his post removed. I suppose working for the Barclay’s helps.

    • Terry Field

      T, the death of the Labour Party and crappy English Socialism is very long overdue.
      The Onions are an anachronistic joke – like the Mafia without the stylish suits, but with all of the predatory menace.
      It is over.
      Capitalism runs the world and so it should, as it is far and away the best form of economic organisation; we should feel blessed we live within it’s boundless free opportunities.

      • Mara Naile-Akim

        I think you’ll find social demcoracy consistently results in higher living standards…

    • Mara Naile-Akim

      The lesson is Salmond. Was a dead duck in the early stages of the referendum campaign, and came rather closer to a result than people expected.

  • Fenman

    Corbyns victory was a classic Marxist coup,achieved by those who signed up after the election,orchestrated by McCluskey,who had been working on it since he shoehorned the hopeless Millie junior into the job. So the first thing the PLP has to do is change the voting rules. Then vote Corbyn out by the PLP?
    . but they lack the guts and the competence. Labour has deciDed it is a hard left socialist party,not asocial democratic one in the German model. So plan B shd be for the social democrats to form a new party.

    • Jaria1

      Agree 100% Fenman.
      I read that Miliband was very much responsible for drafting in the revised rules of electing in a new leader , clearly he just signed what McLusky had drawn up and as we saw the Unions were once again allowed to flood the election .
      Im not sure if the PLP can alter them without the consent of the membership but agree with an emeritus proffessor whose letter in the Telegraph stated that only elected members ie PLP had the right to elect the partys leader. They were elected by the Labour party to carry out this function. Now we see those that were not elected threatening MPs deselelection if they dont follow the man the mob got the job for. Completely the opposite of how it should be

    • Terry Field

      Infantile common room crap. it was a fiasco, in a party whose ideas are dead and unwanted.
      ‘Classic Marxist’. You sound like a silly fifteen year old who wonders around the school corridor with a copy of Das Crapital, and does not understand a word of the utter bilge.

      • Fenman

        Juvenile language And naïeve views merit No Reply.

      • Ian Beale Steeplecoque

        Fool.

    • ReefKnot

      They have decided that,having lost the last two elections and probably the next one, they cannot achieve their aims through the ballot box. So instead of trying they will hope to achieve them via protests, strikes, activism and infiltration of the Public Sector, Quangos, the Charitable sector and the Media.
      Watch and see.

      • jeremy Morfey

        What can one actually achieve by winning a general election, rather than more of the same, because the “rules” have tied the hands of any “democratic” alternative to do any different than the secretly-lobbied specially advised faits accomplis we are sold by politicians who, by law, must be presenters rather than representatives?

        It’s a long time since I have anything better than a clarification when challenging my MP on something I can reason is clearly wrong, and yet right and wrong have nothing to do with it – it’s the rules that count, and they count against me.

        It’s no wonder so much of the electorate are as fed up of this sham as Green-minded VW customers, and have to scratch around for anyone who is prepared to make a difference.

  • Frank

    You omit one key aspect of the battle between Yvette, Liz and Andy. They were all seen as very average candidates, so why not vote for the authentic nutter? You can always dump him a year or two ahead of the next election, by which time you may have better sane candidates!

    • Terry Field

      Labour has only average to poor, because it sells nothing any bright aware person could conceivably want – why would an outstanding person peddle such failed, and fundamentally rotten garbage???

      • Ian Beale Steeplecoque

        I am bright, aware and modest. I want Corbyn as PM. You people are too thick to understand.

  • gerronwithit

    New Labour was a marketing exercise and therefore had a reasonably short shelf life. When it collapsed due to poor sales figures it reverted back to old or real Labour, as it should be termed, which fully manifests itself in Compo Corbyn and his very unpleasant coterie of sidekicks who are absorbable or hidable in massed ranks of Labour suits but the activists decided that he should be the projected face to replace Miliband. Laughable if it was not true for you, me and the Labour Party.

  • mrsjosephinehydehartley

    i suppose blair types are very good at doing what they normally do, which is useful, providing these people are of a calibre that always understands and responds first, to and for whatever form or type bottom-up direction takes.

  • Kennybhoy

    “The Tory problem with Thatcher was that after she was forced out of Downing Street she set about persuading her party that she had been a purely ideological, conviction politician — when she had in fact been a pragmatist when necessary. This led too many of her Tory supporters down an ideological cul-de-sac in an attempt to recapture her election-winning magic. ”

    Sound.

    • Terry Field

      And so what!

      • Kennybhoy

        So what what? The fact that Baroness Thatcher re-wrote the history of her time in office? Or the effect that this had on her party?

        • Terry Field

          I am the one asking the question!
          What is your point! What happened as a result of your observation that is of significance????

          • Kennybhoy

            Are you okay man? Seriously…? 🙁

          • Terry Field

            Drop off, wally.

      • WhiteVanMan

        It lead to Hague IDS being seen as unalecatble.

        • Terry Field

          Don’t be silly; that was just the sweaty little affair between Blair and a seriously politically stupid and pretty unintelligent electorate.

          • WhiteVanMan

            The stupid electorate didn’t vote Hague, what’s wrong with them?.

  • monsieur_charlie

    Perhaps they should consider trying to convince the English that they have their best interest at heart.

    • JSC

      That would be a great idea and a logical way to recover votes, the problem is though, that they can’t contain their contempt for everything and anything English. They suffer from chronic cultural cringe and view any criticism of any foreign culture, or any reluctance of behalf of the English to submit to the demands of foreign cultures as outright racism. And the English, in short are sick of being told “shut up and do as we say, racist”. “Foreigners first, English last” has been their policy for 20 years, and it’s unlikely to change any time soon.

      • monsieur_charlie

        JSC, you have nailed it! And that is why they will never recover.

  • Terry Field

    There is no difference between New and Old Labour. The central control, the power of State over individual, the primacy of belief over intelligent pragmatism, the club of liars who ditch any personal version of socialism for salary and perquisites, the imperative to lie about everything at the drop of a hat for party over country advantage.
    All Labour, New, Old, ALL THE SAME – as are the sleazeballs who think Corbyn is a raging madman but take the salary and opine about ‘party loyalty.
    Mercifully, Labour – of all varieties – is a dead duck.
    Rot in Peace.(or Misery of you can manage to)

  • Varoufake

    It’s all a bit academic discussing the failures of Blairism when the failings of Thatcherism hasn’t been fully understood. Does any other nation on earth go on as much about personified failure? How is the current Chancellor of the Exchequer not an even bigger Blairite than Blair himself? The willingness to learn is zero.

    • Ian Beale Steeplecoque

      Osborne is the end game of Blairite socialism. He is the custodian of £700 billion of new debt

  • JSC

    The fact that Liz Kendall received only 4.5 per cent is proof positive that there’s no New Labour left in Labour.

    • WhiteVanMan

      I was going to vote for her, I voted Yvette tactically panicking of a JC victory, for all the good it did

  • douglas redmayne

    If the implosion of Labour establishes one party rule in this country there will be an explosion of violence against the rich, the smug, and refugees/minorities plus Scotland will leave the UK. Future generations will ultimately consider the Tories responsible. Still, at least I will be OK and don’t have the bad karma for having voted for them.

    • Chamber Pot

      Thank you for explaining this concisely in 5 lines.

    • there will be an opposition. There will be the usual bunch of post Blairite 3rd way, centrist hypocrites who will argue that the Blairite Cameron is the reincarnation of Thomas Gradgrind and that they could make things better by letting in more immigrants and committing fully to the EU. I would imagine that these will coalesce under Miliband (D) at some point in this parliament. There will also, at some point be a UKIPesque opposition from within the Tory party. Hopefully the bone headed, innumerate spoilt children who have brought about the Corbyn revolution have finally cut the roots to the tree that has nourished them as parasites for the last 40 odd years, and they will shrivel up and disappear accordingly

  • stuartMilan

    if you want to talk about a loss of “moral authority” you’d better factor Rotherham into the equation, too

  • free man

    lets see now what are we voting for a bunch of pork porn necrophiliac pedophile’s lying trash murder IDS more trash than we can handle at lest Corbyn is a decant man with little skeleton in the drawer, he’l do fore me.

    • William_Brown

      You are rather odd, aren’t you free man? Do I sense a lack of attendance at school, perhaps?

    • Michael

      Like All left wing turds you forgot to Mention While talking about Stuffing Ugly Pigs That Stinking Pervert Corbyn had that old Sow Abbot, So we are told..

  • William_Brown

    …but then we’d have two left of centre parties.

  • jeremy Morfey

    New Labour will get nowhere with the wider electorate, least of all in the independent Centre (which is where I am) until they can leave attacking Socialists to the Tories, and concentrate their efforts in producing and presenting a better vision for the nation.

    • Mara Naile-Akim

      exactly. If you don’t like Socialism… what are you doing in the party of Clem Attlee?

      • jeremy Morfey

        Clem Attlee’s greatest achievement however was the brainchild of Beveridge, who was a socially conservative Social Liberal (how tangled these political definitions are getting!).

  • While you watch Labour with amusement, the Blairites are busy taking refuge in the Tory party. And they’ll do to your party what they did to Labour.

  • rtj1211

    The lack of emotional intelligence of New Labour extends to the fact that if a voter thinks like a Tory, looks like a Tory, then in all probability he/she will vote like a Tory. It’s only if the Tory Party doesn’t look like the Tory Party to those who look like Tories and think like Tories that they would ever think of doing otherwise. That last point, unfortunately, isn’t under normal circumstances something that the Labour Party can control……..either they infiltrate the Tory Party with a Social Democrat (as Blair infiltrated Labour as the heir to Mrs Thatcher) or they must accept that unless the Tories lose their senses for another decade, they really aren’t going to win trying to be One Nation Tories……

  • Jackthesmilingblack

    “Will anyone fight, fight and fight again to save what’s left of New Labour?”
    God, is that the time? I’ll miss my bus.

  • Mara Naile-Akim

    New Labour did not offer people anything different from the Tories. Same blind belief in austerity, free markets, privatisation, spin, negative campaigning, elitism, etc etc etc. People were sick of it, they wanted a change. No one will mourn New Labour, they failed because they had nothing to say that was original. In fact, I struggle to think if they had anything to say whatsoever.

  • Michael

    What do you mean Who will fight for Labour?,, UKip are Fighting for Every Labour Voter who have been Dumped by the Left Wing Filth that have taken over the Party they Once loved, Labour Now speaks for every low life on the Planet, Ukip Speaks for every Hard working Brit..

  • R Ramdonee

    You’ll be foolish to attack and write off JC. He’s a very intelligent man. I’m certain he’ll win the next election for Labour because he’s the answers to the economic insolvency of the country. There are those who want to win at any price so that they can behave like ‘Napoleon’ in Animal Farm, which is to protect their positions at the top of the Establishment. That’s why the likes of Blair, Straw, Mandelson are unhappy with the real Labour Leader. It’s the case that the truth always hurts. But, in time the people of this country will see that JC is just the honest chap who tells you the things as they are.

    • Pannie

      Yep, he’s so honest, he’s already made about half a dozen U turns on his “principles”. Anyone who thinks that this seriously deluded person can win over the whole of England with his pro-IRA, pro-Hamas, pro-Hezbollah, anti-Monarchy, anti Armed Services, anti-defence and any other anti British cause he can think of should take themselves along to the local Psychiatric Hospital for a lobotomy.

  • new_number_2

    “Will anyone fight, fight and fight again to save what’s left of New Labour?”

    Why bother? New Labour isn’t worth saving and doesn’t deserved to be saved. It should be left to wither and die, serving only as a cautionary tale.

  • Jaria1

    Well Corbyns lieutenants have issued a warning to anyone that does challenge him that they will face deselection and that regardless of opinion he will not resign.
    He plays down the destructive effects his policies will have by excuses and platitudes but weve seen too many politicians play that game. Having fooled enough voters , once in power its a different picture. Hes believed the same thing for 30 plus years but his team have told him his ideas will prevent him getting into power.

  • WTF

    Whats the point, the Labour party started off with moral goals to support workers being abused in the work place but morphed into a left wing social engineering think tank trying to control us. Now that’s failed thankfully its time they were put them out to grass.

    • English man

      Well said.

  • Jaria1

    Study the numbers against the debate on Trident and the truth of Union influence of the Unions will explain why Corbyns huge majority came about. They can deny it as much as they want but the Unions vote were responsible for his victory just as it was for Miliband.

  • John Andrews

    New Labour deserves to rot in hell with its former leaders arguing about which of the gang was the greediest. Why would any decent person want to save it?

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