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Radio

The history of India in 50 personalities

<span style="color: #32363f;">An epic new Radio 4 series that shows how to do history on radio without Neil MacGregor</span>

23 May 2015

9:00 AM

23 May 2015

9:00 AM

The idea of using objects — salt, cod, nutmeg, silk — to turn history lessons into something popular and accessible has been around for at least a generation. It’s a great way to avoid complicated chronologies and the need to remember dates. A well-chosen object, or trading tool, can tell a narrative story that at the same time reflects the multicultural present, often showing unusual and previously unconsidered connections between places and peoples.

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