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Books

A kitchen-garden renaissance

Rose Prince welcomes the return of knobbly tomatoes in all sizes and colours that taste of her childhood

30 May 2015

9:00 AM

30 May 2015

9:00 AM

Edible Memory Jennifer A. Jordan

University of Chicago Press, pp.328, £18, ISBN: 9780226228105

Considerable areas of our memory are taken up with food: it might be the taste of Mother’s sponge, the melting texture of an aunt’s buttery pastry or something recent, like the flavour of the first spoonful of a sour and nutty south-east Asian dish. Especially good meals are recalled with the same clarity as revolting school dinners and the stench of stale fish — we can conjure aromatic memories with ease thanks to the olfactory nerve, the brain’s cache of stored eating experience that helps us to tell good from bad when choosing what to eat.

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Available from the Spectator Bookshop, £16.20 Tel: 08430 600033. Rose Prince’s books include The Pocket Bakery, Kitchenella, The New English Table and The Savvy Shopper.

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