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Features

The awful rise of 'virtue signalling'

Want to be virtuous? Saying the right things violently on Twitter is much easier than real kindness

18 April 2015

9:00 AM

18 April 2015

9:00 AM

Go to a branch of Whole Foods, the American-owned grocery shop, and you will see huge posters advertising Whole Foods, of course, but — more precisely — advertising how virtuous Whole Foods is. A big sign in the window shows a mother with a little child on her shoulders (aaaah!) and declares: ‘values matter.

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James Bartholomew’s latest book is The Welfare of Nations. He writes about easy ways to feel good about yourself on p. 18.

You might disagree with half of it, but you’ll enjoy reading all of it. Try your first month for free, then just $2 a week for the remainder of your first year.


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