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Diary

Miriam Gross’s diary: Why use Freud and Kurt Weill to promote Wagner?

Plus: The library crowd, Oscarphobia, and why fathers with added parental leave are getting off easy

7 March 2015

9:00 AM

7 March 2015

9:00 AM

Last week I went to the exhilarating English National Opera production of Wagner’s The Mastersingers — five hours of wonderful music and singing whizzed by without a moment’s boredom. But there was one odd and perturbing factor, I thought. In place of a curtain, there was a huge ‘frontcloth’. It was covered with a collage of 103 faces of well-known artists.

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Miriam Gross is the author of An Almost English Life. Miriam Gross is a former arts editor of the Observer and a former literary editor of the Sunday Telegraph. Her most recent book is An Almost English Life.

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