From The Archives

From the archives

10 January 2015

9:00 AM

10 January 2015

9:00 AM

From ‘Lord Curzon’s speech’, The Spectator, 9 January 1915: We are glad to record, though in no way surprised to find, that Lord Curzon takes a very serious and very clearly defined view of the duties of the Opposition during a period of national crisis. He recognised that part of these duties in war time can never, as in peace, be the effort to substitute one set of politicians for another in the work of government. On the contrary, in war the support of the King’s Government in all the measures which they may think necessary for ensuring the safety of the country becomes the essential duty of the Opposition. But while this is so, it is in no way to be desired that the Opposition should forgo its function, nay, obligation, of criticism… the criticism made must be solely of actions and never of motives. No occasion must be seized, as it may legitimately be seized in peace time, to discredit a particular member of the opposite party.

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