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Books

Nation-builders on a sticky wicket: the farce and heroism of Pakistani cricket

<p class="p1">A review of Wounded Tiger: A History of Cricket in Pakistan, by Peter Oborne. Not even civil war stops play</p>

16 August 2014

9:00 AM

16 August 2014

9:00 AM

Wounded Tiger: A History of Cricket in Pakistan Peter Oborne

Simon & Schuster, pp.509, £25, ISBN: 9780857200747

There is farce in Peter Oborne’s history of cricket in Pakistan. An impossible umpire is abducted by drunken English tourists and imprisoned in their hotel. Political uncertainty leads to the selection of rival captains and players for the same match against New Zealand. An ageing Pakistan cricketer is ruled out of a one-day international after eating a surfeit of spinach.

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