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Books

Siberia beyond the Gulag Archipelago

<p class="p1">A review of Siberia: A History of the People, by Janet M. Hartley. The region's past is harrowing, but its potential is staggering</p>

16 August 2014

9:00 AM

16 August 2014

9:00 AM

Siberia: A History of the People Janet M. Hartley

Yale, pp.289, £25, ISBN: 9780300167948

Larger than Europe and the United States combined, Siberia is an enormous swathe of Russia, spanning seven time zones and occuping 77 per cent of the country’s land mass. Ryszard Kapuscinski describes the gulags which were placed there as being amongst the greatest nightmares of the 20th century — and that image of suffering has tarnished the region irrevocably.

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