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Books

The lost Victorian who sculpted Churchill

<p class="p1">A review of Abstraction and Reality: The Sculpture of Ivor Roberts-Jones, by Jonathan Black and Sara Ayres. This follower of Rodin has a solid legacy, though his most famous commission was 'a most unpleasant business'</p>

16 August 2014

9:00 AM

16 August 2014

9:00 AM

Abstraction and Reality: The Sculpture of Ivor Roberts-Jones Jonathan Black and Sara Ayres

Philip Wilson Publishers, pp.320, £25, ISBN: 9781781300107

Ivor Roberts-Jones was in many ways the right artist at the wrong time. Had the sculptor been born a few decades earlier and worked in the Victorian age, when statues of the builders and defenders of empire were erected proudly and prolifically across the land, he’d surely have received no end of garlands.

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Available from the Spectator Bookshop, £22.50. Tel: 08430 600033. Alastair Smart is  arts editor and chief art critic of the Sunday Telegraph. 

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