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Opera

Tippett’s Midsummer Marriage is an opera of exuberant genius — but forget about the text

24 August 2013

9:00 AM

24 August 2013

9:00 AM

The Midsummer Marriage

The Proms

Whenever Michael Tippett’s first opera, The Midsummer Marriage, is revived, there is a chorus of voices, including mine, complaining that it should be done much more often, for it is a work of exuberant genius, full of wonderful musical invention, and life-affirming in the way that Britten’s operas never are (with, I think, the exception of Albert Herring).

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