More from Books

Harping on the music of our ancestors

13 April 2024 9:00 am

From a series of mysterious objects – ‘flower flutes’, inscriptions, ‘little black things like beetles’ wing cases’ – Graeme Lawson conjures the haunting melodies of the past

Scrawled outpourings of love and defiance

13 April 2024 9:00 am

Examples of 18th-century graffiti range from romantic rhymes scratched on windowpanes to the haunting marks of political prisoners incised on dungeon walls

London’s dark underbelly: Caledonian Road, by Andrew O’Hagan, reviewed

13 April 2024 9:00 am

With its vast cast and twisting plot, O’Hagan’s complex novel feels as busy and noisy as the north London thoroughfare of its title

What we owe to the self-taught genius Carl Linnaeus

13 April 2024 9:00 am

Bumptious, uncouth and the despair of his schoolmasters, Linnaeus died almost forgotten. Yet he established a system of taxonomy that we still use two centuries later

Sir Roger Casement never deserved to hang

6 April 2024 9:00 am

Executed as one of the leaders of the Easter Rising, he was absent from Dublin at the time of the doomed insurrection – and actually tried to prevent it

The desperate desire to belong: England is Mine, by Nicolas Padamsee, reviewed

6 April 2024 9:00 am

A teenage victim of bullying is gradually drawn into a world of online extremism in this entirely relatable story of the adolescent yearning for acceptance

Turf wars in Las Vegas: City in Ruins, by Don Winslow, reviewed

6 April 2024 9:00 am

The concluding volume of the Danny Ryan trilogy sees the gangster hero involved in a bitter feud over the purchase of a crumbling property on the Las Vegas Strip

‘Now I have been made whole’: Lucy Sante’s experience of transition

6 April 2024 9:00 am

Until the age of 66, Sante lived as a deeply divided man. In this story of self-realisation, she describes how transitioning finally ‘lifted the veil’ over her existence

The secret of success in Formula 1

6 April 2024 9:00 am

For decades, competitive advantage depended on finding loopholes in the sport’s rule book – and no one knew that better than the British entrepreneur Bernie Ecclestone

The rat as hero

6 April 2024 9:00 am

After adopting two baby rats as pets, Joe Shute slowly overcomes his aversion and learns to appreciate the intelligence of creatures that are really quite like us

My prep school scarred me for life

6 April 2024 9:00 am

‘A part of me died at school’, Charles Spencer writes in his shockingly stark account of sadism and sexual abuse at Maidwell Hall, Northamptonshire, in the 1970s

Stories of the Sussex Downs

30 March 2024 9:00 am

Focusing on a 20-mile square of West Sussex, Alexandra Harris explores its rich history, from the wreck of a Viking longboat to a refuge for French Resistance agents

The horrors of the Eastern Front

30 March 2024 9:00 am

Nick Lloyd reinforces Churchill’s sentiment that the first world war in the East was ‘one of the most frightful misfortunes to befall mankind’

Why today’s youth is so anxious and judgmental

30 March 2024 9:00 am

In a well-evidenced diatribe, Jonathan Haidt accuses the creators of smartphone culture of rewiring childhood and changing human development on an unimaginable scale

On the road with Danny Lyon

30 March 2024 9:00 am

The celebrated photojournalist describes his peripatetic youth recording revolution in Haiti, hunger and homelessness in Mexico and the civil rights movement in the US

Caught in a Venus flytrap: Red Pyramid, by Vladimir Sorokin, reviewed

30 March 2024 9:00 am

Sorokin’s satirical stories are not for the fainthearted, but there are few more dedicated critics of Russia's infinite bureaucracy writing fiction today

Resolute, dignified and intelligent: Elizabeth II inspired loyalty from the start

30 March 2024 9:00 am

Alexander Larman describes how, from 1945 onwards, the House of Windsor set about rebranding itself after a decade of crisis both internal and external

The world’s largest flower is also its ugliest

30 March 2024 9:00 am

Known as ‘corpse flower’, the sinister Rafflesia resembles slabs of bloody, white-flecked meat, emits the scent of rotting flesh and eventually subsides into a mass of black slime

The curious influence of Oscar Wilde on Hollywood

23 March 2024 9:00 am

After Wilde’s visit to the US in 1882, his philosophy of life became an inspiration to early filmmakers in their revolt against corporate America, Wall Street and provincial pettiness

A voyage of literary discovery: Clara Reads Proust, by Stéphane Carlier, reviewed

23 March 2024 9:00 am

A 23-year-old hairdresser casually picks up a copy of Swann’s Way left behind by a client – only to find the novel taking over her life

The true valour needed to go on pilgrimage in Britain

23 March 2024 9:00 am

Oliver Smith finds sanctity in remote peninsulas and holy islands, but is less impressed by the tacky ephemera that decorate our more accessible shrines

Boxing clever: Headshot, by Rita Bullwinkel, reviewed

23 March 2024 9:00 am

As eight teenage girls progress through a boxing championship in Reno, fighting is shown to be an undeniable, animal part of femininity in this knockout debut novel

Garbriel García Márquez has been ill-served by his sons

23 March 2024 9:00 am

Posthumously published against the author’s wishes, Until August should not detract from Marquez’s best work – but it would have been better left as a curiosity in the archives

New light on the New Testament

23 March 2024 9:00 am

Candida Moss reveals that many New Testament texts, including St Mark’s Gospel, were penned by enslaved scribes who became influential interpreters of Christian scripture

The healing power of Grasmere

23 March 2024 9:00 am

Following in Wordsworth’s footsteps, Esther Rutter finds new self-confidence and happiness in the entrancing surroundings of Dove Cottage