More from Books

A surprising number of scientists believe in little green men

4 May 2024 9:00 am

Eminent astronomers have explained cosmic anomalies as alien megastructures and spaceships, while the source of the celebrated Wow! signal remains anyone’s guess

The naming of cats

27 April 2024 9:00 am

It took a long time for cats to gain the same serious status as dogs, but by the 18th century they were starting to have personalities, says Kathryn Hughes

The slave’s story: James, by Percival Everett, reviewed

27 April 2024 9:00 am

A retelling of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn in the voice of Huck’s companion the runaway slave changes the nature of the pair’s relationship – not always for the better

Alone and defenceless: the tragic death of Captain Cook

27 April 2024 9:00 am

Striding ashore unarmed showed courage that bordered on recklessness. But it was a kind of theatre Cook relished on his travels - and, famously, it didn’t always work

What does Christian atheism mean?

27 April 2024 9:00 am

Slavoj Žižek claims to value Christianity’s ‘dissident’ credentials, but his atheist vision of reality rests on assumptions repeatedly challenged by Jesus

Four female writers at the court of Elizabeth I

27 April 2024 9:00 am

Of Ramie Targoff’s gifted quartet, Mary Sidney was particularly admired by her contemporaries for her translation of the Psalms into English verse

The circus provides perfect cover for espionage

27 April 2024 9:00 am

As he flew his plane between circus acts across Germany in the 1930s, Cyril Bertram Mills gained vital aerial intelligence about the Nazis’ rearmament programme

Hero and villain: The Two Loves of Sophie Strom, by Sam Taylor, reviewed

27 April 2024 9:00 am

A Jewish teenager is the victim of a Nazi arson attack in 1933. Alternative scenarios see him joining the French Resistance, and being recruited by the SS

Emily Dickinson was not such a recluse after all

27 April 2024 9:00 am

Far from being closeted in her bedroom, her letters show that she was still travelling in her mid-thirties, and taking pleasure in gardening and the glories of nature

The awkwardness of love in middle age: You Are Here, by David Nicholls, reviewed

27 April 2024 9:00 am

A man and woman, both casualties of failed marriages, are attracted to one another on a walking holiday, but are strangely overcome by shyness

Must Paris reinvent itself?

27 April 2024 9:00 am

The beautifully preserved, elitist metropolis now looks increasingly out of step with neighbouring capitals and may be forced to become more multicultural

Murder in the dark: The Eighth House, by Linda Segtnan, reviewed

20 April 2024 9:00 am

Motherhood prompts Segtnan to research the cold case of Birgitta Sivander, a nine-year-old found murdered in a Swedish forest in 1948

Are we all becoming hermits now?

20 April 2024 9:00 am

A new anthropological type is emerging, says Pascal Bruckner – the shrivelled, hyperconnected being who no longer needs others or the outside world

John Deakin: the perfect anti-hero of the tawdry Soho scene

20 April 2024 9:00 am

The photographer never attempted to show anyone in a good light, making his portraits of Francis Bacon and other Soho habitués look like dress rehearsals for morgue shots

A magnificent set of dentures still leaves little to smile about

20 April 2024 9:00 am

After undergoing prolonged cosmetic dentistry, 50-year-old John Patrick Higgins reluctantly acknowledges that he’ll never be the stylish man about town of his dreams

The Dreyfus Affair continues to haunt France to this day

20 April 2024 9:00 am

Inspired by the likes of Éric Zemmour, the extreme right is not only reviving reactionary ideas but even questioning the innocence of Captain Dreyfus himself

They felt they could achieve anything together: two brave women in war-torn Serbia

20 April 2024 9:00 am

Vera Holme and Evelina Haverfield, lovers and fellow suffragettes, risked their lives as nursing staff in the first world war and exposed the absurdity of Edwardian homophobia

Being a printer was what Benjamin Franklin prided himself on most

20 April 2024 9:00 am

Having learnt the trade as a child in London, the polymath established a thriving printing business in Philadelphia, bringing humour and enlightenment to the American millions

Grotesque vignettes: The Body in the Mobile Library and Other Stories, by Peter Bradshaw, reviewed

20 April 2024 9:00 am

Relishing the outrageous and improbable, Bradshaw treats us to stories that often rely more on twist than plot

Mediterranean Gothic: The Sleepwalkers, by Scarlett Thomas, reviewed

13 April 2024 9:00 am

Thomas tells her tale of a hellish honeymoon on a Greek island with the cunning of an Aegean sorceress, keeping her readers pleasurably unsettled and alert

There’s nothing shameful about hypochondria

13 April 2024 9:00 am

Caroline Crampton describes the real agonies of people obsessed with their fragility, revealing that her own hypochondria stems from a childhood cancer diagnosis

Adrift on the Canadian frontier: The Voyageur, by Paul Carlucci, reviewed

13 April 2024 9:00 am

Based on the 19th-century ‘voyageur’ Alexis de Martin, Carlucci’s young protagonist is befriended by kindly strangers. But what are their true motives?

English civil law has become a luxury good beyond the reach of most of us

13 April 2024 9:00 am

Tom Burgis makes this painfully clear in his account of the long hounding of the former MP Charlotte Leslie by the vengeful millionaire Mohamed Amersi

Are we finally beginning to understand gravity?

13 April 2024 9:00 am

Claudia de Rham explores the true nature of this fundamental force as she struggles against received wisdom to get a new theory of ‘massive gravity’ recognised

Eighty years on, the planning of Operation Neptune remains awesome

13 April 2024 9:00 am

The seaborne invasion went so smoothly, it might have been thought plain-sailing. But that was far from the truth. Nick Hewitt describes the meticulous forethought that preceded it