Deborah Ross

Sublime: Taron Egerton as Elton John in Rocketman

Rocketman is cheesy and clichéd – and all the better for it

25 May 2019 9:00 am

There have been claims that Rocketman, the biopic of Elton John, is ‘cheesy’ and ‘clichéd’, but, in truth, you do…

Can Deborah Ross finish her Tolkien review before it fades from memory?

4 May 2019 9:00 am

Tolkien is a biopic covering the early life of J.R.R. Tolkien (Nicholas Hoult) and it is not especially memorable. I’m…

Any scene she isn’t in pretty much dies on its arse: Julianne Moore in Bel Canto

Not nearly as good as the book: Bel Canto reviewed

27 April 2019 9:00 am

Bel Canto is an adaptation of the Ann Patchett novel first published in 2001, which I remembered as being brilliant…

Manspreading, The Movie: Loro reviewed

20 April 2019 9:00 am

Fans of Paolo Sorrentino’s Il Divo, The Great Beauty (which won an Oscar) and his HBO series, The Young Pope,…

With each song Jessie Buckley practically burns a hole in the screen

Jessie Buckley’s performance burns a hole in the screen: Wild Rose reviewed

13 April 2019 9:00 am

Jessie Buckley is the actress who, you may remember, was ‘phenomenal’ in Beast — I am quoting myself here so…

The innocent: Adriano Tardiolo as Lazzaro

Intriguing and beguiling but God know what it adds up to: Happy as Lazzaro reviewed

6 April 2019 9:00 am

Alice Rohrwacher’s Happy as Lazzaro sets out as a neorealist tale of exploited sharecroppers, but midway through the story it…

Spell-binding: Lupita Nyong’o as Adelaide in Us

Nyong’o is spellbinding but the plot is ultimately baffling: Us reviewed

23 March 2019 9:00 am

Us is a second feature from Jordan Peele after his marvellous debut Get Out, which was more brilliantly satirical than…

Colin Morgan as Benjamin and Phénix Brossard as Noah in Simon Amstell’s Benjamin

Tender, sweet, affecting: Simon Amstell’s Benjamin reviewed

16 March 2019 9:00 am

Simon Amstell’s Benjamin is a romantic comedy about a young filmmaker whose second feature is about to première, and he’s…

More than able to carry a film of this type: Brie Larson as Captain Marvel

Finally a Marvel film that doesn’t entirely bore the pants off Deborah Ross

9 March 2019 9:00 am

Captain Marvel is the 654th film in the Marvel franchise — the figure is something like that, I think —…

Only the lonely: Charlotte Rampling is superb as Hannah

Peculiarly mesmerising: Hannah reviewed

2 March 2019 9:00 am

Hannah stars Charlotte Rampling in a film where not much happens and not much happens and not much happens and…

Crackles with nylon, self-regard and unearned privilege: On the Basis of Sex reviewed

23 February 2019 9:00 am

Ruth Bader Ginsburg is too ill to sit on the Supreme Court. When she saw On the Basis of Sex,…

Mesmerising: Rosamund Pike as Marie Colvin in A Private War

The film makes you ashamed to call yourself a journalist: A Private War reviewed

16 February 2019 9:00 am

A Private War is a biopic of the celebrated Sunday Times war correspondent Marie Colvin who was, judging from this,…

All is not very true in All Is True – and all is not very interesting either

9 February 2019 9:00 am

All Is True is Kenneth Branagh’s biopic of Shakespeare’s last years and All Is Not Very True, apparently, which we…

Emotionally devastating: Richard E. Grant and Melissa McCarthy in Can You Ever Forgive Me?

Rivetingly moving: Can You Ever Forgive Me? reviewed

2 February 2019 9:00 am

Can You Ever Forgive Me? is a true story based on the 2008 memoir of Lee Israel, the writer who…

Nicole Kidman being 'brave' in Destroyer

Boy, does Nicole Kidman look terrible: Destroyer reviewed

26 January 2019 9:00 am

Destroyer is an LA noir starring Nicole Kidman ‘as you have never seen her before’. Her hair is terrible. Her…

Better than the film deserves: Saoirse Ronan as Mary Queen of Scots

A slog – and why does Elizabeth look like Ronald McDonald? Mary Queen of Scots reviewed

19 January 2019 9:00 am

Mary Queen of Scots is a historical costume drama that, unlike The Favourite, does not breathe new life into the…

Flat-out fabulous: Emma Stone as Abigail Hill in The Favourite

I don’t just recommend you see The Favourite. I command it

5 January 2019 9:00 am

The Favourite is a period romp set during the reign of Queen Anne, but it’s not your average period romp.…

Practically perfect in every way: Joel Dawson and Emily Blunt in Mary Poppins Returns

There’s something about Mary

15 December 2018 9:00 am

So, Mary Poppins returns, and I was, of course, primed to be spiteful, as is my nature. Not a patch…

Nothing much happens, yet there is so much to watch: Alfonso Cuaron’s Roma. [Photograph: Carlos Somonte/Netflix]

Nothing much happens, yet there’s so much to watch: Roma reviewed

8 December 2018 9:00 am

Roma is the latest film from Alfonso Cuaron (Gravity,Y Tu Mama Tambien, Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban) and…

Rachel Weisz, Rachel McAdams and Alessandro Nivola in Disobedience

A major missed opportunity: Disobedience reviewed

1 December 2018 9:00 am

Disobedience is an adaptation of Naomi Alderman’s novel about forbidden, lesbian love in orthodox Jewish north London, starring Rachel Weisz…

Forget Robin Hood and Girl in the Spider’s Web – Shoplifters is the film to see this week

24 November 2018 9:00 am

The major releases this week are Robin Hood, as a big Hollywood retelling, and The Girl in the Spider’s Web,…

A mess: Fantastic Beasts reviewed

17 November 2018 9:00 am

Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald is the sequel to the Harry Potter prequel Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find…

Carey Mulligan in 'Wildlife'. Photo: Courtesy of Sundance Institute

Exquisite and riveting: Wildlife reviewed

10 November 2018 9:00 am

Wildlife is an adaptation of the 1990 novel by Richard Ford about a family coming apart at the seams, and…

A large cast is mostly led by shouty men, who lead shouty meetings: Mike Leigh’s Peterloo

It’s like being trapped in an episode of Poldark: Peterloo reviewed

3 November 2018 9:00 am

Mike Leigh’s Peterloo is one of those films where you keep waiting for it to get good, and waiting and…

The only ones to come out of Dogman well are the dogs

Bleak, unflinching, oppressive, violent – and magical: Dogman reviewed

20 October 2018 9:00 am

Matteo Garrone’s Dogman, which is Italy’s entry for the foreign language Oscar next year, is bleak, unflinching, oppressive, masculine (very),…