Charlotte Moore

Anything for a good story

22 April 2017 9:00 am

When I was at boarding school in the early 1970s, the Durrells, or at least Gerald, were immensely popular. My…

Old, unhappy, far off things

11 February 2017 9:00 am

August Geiger led an unremarkable life. Born in 1926, the third of ten children of a Catholic farming family in…

The don’ts of ‘parenting’

3 September 2016 9:00 am

In the American way, the child psychologist Alison Gopnik’s new book has an attractive sound-bitey title dragging a flat-footed subtitle…

Love like Salt: a memoir of music, motherhood and magical thinking

19 March 2016 9:00 am

Helen Stevenson’s daughter Clara has cystic fibrosis. Love Like Salt is an account of living with the disease, but it…

The boy who rebuilt the sun on earth

4 July 2015 9:00 am

In 2008, when Taylor Wilson was 14, he created a working nuclear fusion reactor, ‘a miniature sun on earth’. At…

Monstrous, beautiful, damaged people make for tiresome company in Polly Samson’s The Kindness

21 March 2015 9:00 am

Julian is clever, handsome and spoiled, a gilded youth who has all the girls wanting to mother him, and a…

Powers of persuasion: how Churchill brought America on side

7 February 2015 9:00 am

In time for the 50th anniversary of Churchill’s death comes this pacy novel about his attempts to persuade the Americans…

Sabina Spielrein: from psychiatric patient to psychoanalyst

29 November 2014 9:00 am

Sabina Spielrein was a psychiatrist and psychoanalyst with groundbreaking ideas about the role of the reproductive drive in human psychology…

Sweeping away evidence: where in those calm, tile-floored 17th-century rooms can we even glimpse a spittoon? ‘Dutch Interior’ by Pieter Janssens Elinga

The history of the home – with the spittoons put back in

25 October 2014 9:00 am

In 1978, a family of Russian ‘Old Believers’ living in a supposedly uninhabited part of the Siberian taiga were discovered…

Andrew Marr thinks he’s a novelist. I don’t

20 September 2014 9:00 am

It’s September 2017, and our still apparently United Kingdom is in the throes of a referendum campaign. The wise, charming,…

In love with the lodger

30 August 2014 9:00 am

Champion Hill, Camberwell, 1922. A mother and daughter, stripped of their menfolk by the Great War, struggle to make ends…

The Russian literary celebrity who begged Tolstoy to spare Prince Andrei

19 July 2014 9:00 am

Nadezhda Alexandrovna Lokhvitskaya was a literary celebrity in pre-revolutionary St Petersburg. She chose the pen-name ‘Teffi’ because it was androgynous,…

Start with a torpedo, and see where you go from there

19 April 2014 9:00 am

Sebastian Barry’s new novel opens with a bang, as a German torpedo hits a supply ship bound for the Gold…

Did Hurricane Katrina have an angel of mercy — or an angel of death? 

15 February 2014 9:00 am

On 28 August 2005 — Sheri Fink’s Day One — Hurricane Katrina reached New Orleans. The National Weather Service warned…

Why Jeremy Paxman's Great War deserves a place on your bookshelf

2 November 2013 9:00 am

The Great War involved the civilian population like no previous conflict. ‘Men, women and children, factory, workshop and army —…

The Son, by Philipp Meyer - review

3 August 2013 9:00 am

Colonel Eli McCullough, formerly known as Tiehteti, is a living legend. The first male child born in the Republic of…