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The country house is dead: that’s why we love it so

9 October 2021

9:00 AM

9 October 2021

9:00 AM

The Story of the Country House: A History of Places and People Clive Aslet

Yale University Press, pp.256, 18.99

The true English disease is Downton Syndrome. Symptoms include a yearning for a past of chivalry, grandeur and unambiguously stratified social order, where Johnny Foreigner had no place unless perhaps as butler in the pantry or mistress in the bedroom. And the focus of the disease is the country house, Britain’s best contribution to the world history of architecture.

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