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The empire that sprang from nowhere under the banner of Islam

29 May 2021

9:00 AM

29 May 2021

9:00 AM

The Arab Conquests: The Spread of Islam and the First Caliphates Justin Marozzi

Head of Zeus, pp.240, 18.99

When the British formed the basis of their empire in the 1600s by acquiring territories in India and North America, they already had many centuries’ experience of foreign involvement. One of the most remarkable aspects of the force that reshaped Eurasia 1,000 years earlier is that there was no prelude: the Arab conquests, and the Islamic empire that they created, came out of nowhere.

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