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Winston Churchill’s remarkable love of science

Churchill’s wartime passion

24 October 2020

9:00 AM

24 October 2020

9:00 AM

Churchill was the first British prime minister to appoint a scientific adviser, as early as the 1940s. He had regular meetings with scientists such as Bernard Lovell, the father of radioastronomy, and loved talking with them. He promoted, with public funds research, telescopes and the laboratories where some of the most significant developments of the postwar period first came to light, from molecular genetics to crystallography using X-rays.

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