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Oxford skulduggery: The Sandpit, by Nicholas Shakespeare, reviewed

25 July 2020

9:00 AM

25 July 2020

9:00 AM

The Sandpit Nicholas Shakespeare

Harvill Secker, pp.448, 16.99

Melancholy pervades this novel: a sense of glasses considerably more than half empty, with the levels sinking fast. This is largely due to its central character, John Dyer, a former journalist in his late fifties, who has returned from years in South America to live in Oxford and write a book about Portugal’s accidental discovery of Brazil.

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