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René Dreyfus: the racing driver detested by the Nazis

2 May 2020

9:00 AM

2 May 2020

9:00 AM

Faster: How a Jewish Driver, an American Heiress and a Legendary Car Beat Hitler’s Best Neal Bascomb

Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, pp.344, 21.7

I have driven a racing car. On television, it looks like a smooth and scientific matter. It is not. A racing car is a fearsome environment of engulfing pyroclastic heat, metaphor-testing noise, vision-blurring vibration and nauseating centrifugal forces. Ninety years ago it was even worse. The cars had tyres with little grip, feeble brakes and no crash protection whatever.

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