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Books

Writing as revenge: Memories of the Future, by Siri Hustvedt, reviewed

23 March 2019

9:00 AM

23 March 2019

9:00 AM

Why are people interested in their past? One possible reason is that you can interact with it, recruiting it as an agent of the present and the future. Siri Hustvedt’s novel, masked as a memoir, suggests you should rely not so much on your recollection of particular events as on your ability to interpret them, which can produce something truer than bare facts.

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