Features Australia

What Rotherham means

2 June 2018

9:00 AM

2 June 2018

9:00 AM

The revelations of unhindered Muslim sex-trafficking of thousands of young girls in British towns, including Rotherham, Rochdale and Oxford, are so gross and shocking, so monstrous, and on such a scale as to actually make response or comment difficult, except to point out that they display Britain – or a significant part of it – as a failed and broken culture.

The most shocking aspect, of course, is the craven failure on a staggering scale of the very institutions part of whose raison d’être is precisely to prevent such things: the police, the social work industries, the local government bodies, and probably, at least in some cases, parents (certainly some parents seem to have done their best, and quite properly approached the authorities, only to be ignored).

The sickening, Eloi-like passivity with which the police and social-workers behaved for fear of being accused of racism indicates mass cowardice and moral corruption on a scale again difficult to describe. The more that is revealed about this scandal the worse it seems. It is not too much to call it the worst British public/political scandal in modern history. It so totally eclipses the Thorpe snd Profumo affairs that it would be simply riduculous, and insulting to the victims, to mention them in the same context. Further, the Jobsworths who condoned it appear to have had no meaningful punishment. More than that: at least one of the courageous whistle-blowers on the business was not merely ignored but actively persecuted by the authorities.

The Muslim men responsible were few in number but there is little comfort in that: it means they must have been sheltered by their ‘communities’ – and for years. Peter Smith wrote in Quadrant Online recently (in the context of Gazan families using their own childfren as suicide bombers): ‘Islamic scripture provides grist for grievance and barbarism.’ Here is another example of that in action.

There is, however, an aspect even beyond this: these sickening episodes show that at least a part of the Muslim (largely Pakistani) population, which England has been importing wholesale, regard British society – and here one of its most vulnerable sub-groups – with contempt and hatred. To suggest it arises out of cultural differences, for example a belief that all revealingly-clad girls and women are prostitutes, is pernicious nonsense. The criminals concerned had lived in England for years and knew perfectly well that this was not the case. The girls were silenced by drugs, beatings, and threats to themselves and their families.

We see an urge to degrade and destroy innocence which the institutions of society condoned, in thousands of cases, over years, in locations spread so far across England that it looks more than a little likely that other such gangs are still operating.


Where civilised cultures hold that young children, and especially young girls, should be protected and cared for, it is obvious that these sex-gangs regarded them in something the same light as Nazis regarded Jews – something worse than an enemy, a kind of foul bacillus to be degraded and whose lives were worthless.

It does not take great genius to know that sexual abuse of a child will affect a child’s entire future unless appropriate therapy (if such a thing exists) is forthcoming. The sexual abuse of white children by non-white men on this industrial scale can only, in a country like Britain, be motivated by anti-white racist hatred and a desire to degrade and humiliate the children concerned as representatives of Western civilisation.

It is not as if the children were all unprotesting: there were many protests and reports to police, council and social workers which produced no results. One social worker is reported to have laughed when a 13-year-old girl told her she was being sold to Muslim men for sex and gave her contraceptives. The girl, Zoe Patterson, now 30, has recently published a book, Trafficked Girl, detailing how her pleas for help were ignored.

Robert Spencer, publisher of the newsletter Jihad Watch, commented: ‘Why did the social worker laugh? Maybe because she had heard of so many such cases, and knew that British authorities were too paralysed by fear of being accused of “racism” or “Islamophobia” to do anything about them.’

The local government ombudsman has ordered Rotherham Council to apologise to charity worker Jayne Senior, who blew the whistle on the situation. Council officials raided her charity after she revealed that council, police and social services turned a blind eye to the abuse of at least 1,400 children. Senior had been investigated by the council since August 2016, after she was made an MBE for her services to child protection. The council alleged Senior earned up to £1m by charging for interviews and sharing information inappropriately, which she denies. She published a book, Broken and Betrayed, which revealed how she risked imprisonment to provide evidence of the mass sex-abuse at the hands of men of Pakistani origin.

The left-wing Guardian claims a leaked copy of the report by the ombudsman found the council misled Senior about the progress of their investigation, and kept her waiting for a year to find out details of allegations made against her .

Opposition leader Jeremy Corbyn is alleged to have done much to suppress the issue when he banished Rotherham MP Sarah Champion from his shadow cabinet for speaking out regarding the grooming. Corbyn followed Champion’s dismissal by falsely claiming there was no “particular problem” with grooming in the British-Pakistani Muslim community. In fact the Muslim think-tank Quilliam has reported 84 per cent of grooming convictions are against ‘Asian’ men, of predominantly Pakistani-Muslim origin. He seems to have got away with it.

Now the British police are enmeshed in yet another scandal: a Newcastle rape gang comprised of Muslim men was left untouched while the authorities reportedly ‘appeared to punish victims,’ according to the Independent (UK). It claims Muslim grooming gangs abused more than 700 women and girls around Newcastle.

The official excuse was apparently that the abuse could not be stopped without work to understand the profiles, motivations and cultural influences of perpetrators.

No one seems to have suggested that one way to stop the mass abuse would be stiff prison sentences followed by deportation, and a swag of civil actions against the authorities, coupled with career-termination with forfeiture of pensions for public officers who failed in their plain duty.

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