Latham's Law

Latham’s law

16 June 2018

9:00 AM

16 June 2018

9:00 AM

At last, there’s a break in the weather. As identity politics has swept across Australia like a crackling thunderstorm, drenching the public with left-wing propaganda, it has been difficult to find an honest appraisal of the doctrine of ‘unconscious bias’.

Until now. From the most unlikely source, I’ve come across five minutes of evidence-based sunshine.

The Diversity Council of Australia (DCA) has conceded that workplace seminars trying to rid staff of their ‘unconscious biases’ are as ineffective as a Barnaby Joyce-run course on chastity.

‘Research shows that (staff) training has mixed results and limited success’, the DCA lamented in a recent note to its members, concluding that: ‘It can be a lot easier just to de-bias the environment rather than take on the might of the human mind, with all its complexities and implicit biases.’

What an admission. After a decade of Stalinist indoctrination programs, trying to convince workers that strange voices are bouncing around in their brains, urging them to discriminate against ‘minority groups’, the peak Diversity body in Australia has conceded defeat.

The human mind is too rational, too incisive to accept the kind of intellectual sludge advanced during unconscious bias training.

I’ve spoken to people who have sat through these sessions and the first thing they say is, ‘If it’s supposed to be unconscious how does anyone know what it is, including the dickhead at the front of the room telling me I have lost control of my thought processes?’


A local government worker told me, ‘We spent half a day thinking to ourselves it was all baloney, wishing the seminar would just end.’ When it did, he reckons the participants looked at each other like they had witnessed something from outer space, the funniest alien show since Mork & Mindy.

Thank goodness people aren’t stupid. At the training sessions they heard voices all right: the nonsensical ramblings of leftist facilitators, which went in one ear and then rapidly out the other.

The DCA admission is no small thing. The Council’s membership is a who’s who of government agencies and corporate Australia – everyone from the ABC and Sydney University to Cricket Australia, Qantas and AGL. Each of them has wasted their money in believing that unconscious bias might be real.

The Council’s chairman is former Australian of the Year, David Morrison. He’s famous for declaring that our great national crisis is not in rising energy prices, substandard schooling or the threat of radical Islamic terrorism. It’s in the use of the word ‘guys’ in the workplace.

Having watched Australian workers wise up to the myth of unconscious bias, the guys at the Diversity Council have created a ready-made replacement. They live by the motto: if one leftist hoax doesn’t work, simply invent another.

They are now aiming to ‘de-bias the work environment’ with a thing called ‘Inclusion Nudges’. If unconscious bias was from Mars, this one has flown in from Pluto.

According to the DCA website, ‘Inclusion Nudges focus on changing the work environment to outsmart and interrupt our unconscious biases, rather than just relying on individuals to do this themselves. It involves tweaking and making adjustments to organisational policies and practices – nudging people, rather than just training them, towards more inclusive choices.’ It sounds wondrous, until you read what it actually involves.

Inclusion Nudges are the brainchild of two left-feminists: Tina Nielsen, a Danish Green who describes herself as ‘a diversity and inclusion thought leader’ and Lisa Kepinski, head of the globalist Inclusion Institute.

One of their recommended techniques is for companies to buy a set of cardboard imitation glasses and sit them on the table at personnel selection meetings. Then, as they describe it, if the discussion has not arrived at ‘inclusive outcomes, the CEO should instruct his staff to put on their “gender lens” and review the discussions for any biases at play.’ That’s right, everyone at the meeting has to wear fake glasses.

According to Nielsen and Kepinski, this is a form of culture shock, ‘a physical prompting nudge that interrupts business-as-usual decision making.’ I think it’s more like a Specsavers ad. It’s the corporate equivalent of a lifeguard wading into the ocean but dragging out a seal for CPR.

A company could be paying its executives millions and they’ve got to sit there looking like preschool kids wearing cardboard glasses. I suppose the full Groucho Marx ensemble is out of the question, as that might signify ‘white male privilege’ or even worse, the po-faced Left enjoying a good belly laugh. No, you are not dreaming. This really is the direction the DCA and its members are headed.

Look out for the likes of Alan Joyce and Andrew Vesey nudging away in the near future, wearing the very latest in leftist fashion: a rainbow-coloured set of fake glasses.

As for me, the poor soul that has had to wade through the DCA website, I’m worried their crapola might be contagious. So I’m off to talk to some normal people, to nudge myself back into reality.

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