Flat White

In which their ABC outdoes itself

18 March 2018

6:58 PM

18 March 2018

6:58 PM

On Friday Fairfax media — Fairfax media, mind you, not The Australian — reported:

ABC journalists should focus more on economic and hip pocket issues and “spend more time talking to ordinary Australians”, an internal review at the broadcaster has found.

An audit of the network’s news coverage, designed to investigate claims of left-wing bias and “elitist” story selection, has concluded the ABC should be more concerned with the effect of issues on “average citizens”…

The ABC’s Editorial Policies unit examined eight weeks of news coverage across radio and TV and compared the ABC’s stories to those offered by commercial news networks and the SBS …

Senior ABC bosses Jane Connors and Alan Sunderland, who authored the report, found the ABC did select “substantially different” stories from its commercial rivals, including more … social policy stories.

The ABC Charter, of course, begins:

(1)  The functions of the Corporation are:

(a)  to provide within Australia innovative and comprehensive broadcasting services of a high standard as part of the Australian broadcasting system consisting of national, commercial and community sectors and, without limiting the generality of the foregoing, to provide:

(i)  broadcasting programs that contribute to a sense of national identity and inform and entertain, and reflect the cultural diversity of, the Australian community; and

(ii)  broadcasting programs of an educational nature…

So, how did Their ABC respond on Saturday? With this truly remarkable effort in left-wing identity politics irrelevance:

The what? Where? Read on:

A newspaper has been slammed for removing a reference to a man’s husband from his mother’s obituary.

The Olton Enterprise published the obituary to Brenda Light in its paper on February 23, but edited the original tribute sent to the publication.

The obituary said: “Those left to cherish her memories include her son, Barry Giles, and his husband, John Gambill, of Dallas.”

But the published version had no reference to Mr Gambill, and said: “Those left to cherish her memories include her son, Barry Giles …”

Ok. Let’s get this straight. The ABC, the supposed Australian national broadcaster,  gave a run — complete with a breakout “main points” section — to a three-week-old American story purely because it featured one of the very favourite topics of the worker’s collective that actually runs the show, same-sex marriage.

A three-week-old American story from where, exactly? Over to Wikipedia:

Olton is a city in Lamb County, Texas, United States. The population was 2,215 at the 2010 census.

So stale talk from a tiny town in the north-west corner of Texas, 30,000 kilometres away from the ABC bunker in Ultimo helps “contribute to a sense of national identity and inform and entertain, and reflect the cultural diversity of, the Australian community”.

Sunderland and Connors need to rip up their report and start again.

And does Communications Minister Mitch Fifield even care?

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